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Summary of historical attacks using chemical or biological weapons

Photo Credit: Image by Danielle Tunstall from Pixabay

Summary of historical attacks using chemical or biological weapons

compiled by Wm. Robert Johnston
last updated 5 December 2017

The following table summarizes known historical instances of the use of chemical or biological weapons, in reverse chronological order. The listing is limited to events after 1900 (while there were some earlier instances of chemical/biological warfare, these instances were generally of very limited effectiveness). Note that some incidents are disputed, and casualty figures in some cases are very uncertain. Events included:

  • use in warfare: multiple attacks within a war are grouped together.
  • use by terrorists: includes attacks with larger numbers of casualties.
  • other: several criminal incidents and accidental chemical releases are included because of their significance.

Sources are provided following the table at the link below

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http://www.johnstonsarchive.net/terrorism/chembioattacks.html

9/11 for dummies

A sub 5 minute educational video about the events surrounding 9/11. How 19 men armed with box cutters and directed by a man on dialysis in a cave fortress halfway around the world, launched the most sophisticated attack in history, against the most heavily defended nation on the planet.

Published on Apr 13, 2012

If 1080 breaks down to become ‘harmless’ in water, why was it once dyed to show up in floodwaters or in the case of terror attacks, in public water reservoirs?

By Carol Sawyer

BLACK DYE IN THE PURE 1080 POISON – “SO IT WILL SHOW UP IN FLOODWATERS AND IN PUBLIC WATER RESERVOIRS”!!!!

“The Nixon administration in 1972 banned the use of 1080 for livestock protection after complaints that it was also killing eagles and other animals”

In the 2004 article below, Charles Wigley, owner of the Tull Chemical Co in Oxford, Alabama, from whence for many years NZ has sourced the pure 1080 poison with which to make its 1080 baits, (and still does), says he :

“…. follows the law and laces his poison with black dye that would show up if the chemical, an organic compound, got into either floodwaters in the neighborhood or – if used by terrorists – a public water reservoir.”

Please note the mention of floodwaters and terrorists! They do know how lethal this stuff is, and it is classified in the USA as a weapon of mass destruction.

However I have received the following today from a reliable source:

“35 or so years ago the 1080 powder came from Japan in 1 lb tins and this contained black nigrosin dye to colour any solution made from the powder. Tull used a similar material but the nigrosin dye was greasy and used to block up the spray jets on the carrot cutters. Thus it was left out and a different black dye was incorporated with solution made up at this end. The idea that the nigrosin dye would help identify 1080 in flood waters is totally ridiculous. The rate of dilution would simply be too high. I doubt that Charles Wigley would have said such a thing.”

According to reporter Jay Reeves, he did.

******************************************

Maker of Lethal Chemical Fights a Ban.
December 19, 2004

By JAY REEVES
Associated Press Writer

OXFORD, Ala. – The small factory at the end of Burton Street doesn’t look like much from the outside, but its product is getting attention from Washington to the other side of the world.

Virtually unknown outside the neighborhood where it has been operating since the late 1950s, Tull Chemical Co. is the only known producer of Compound 1080, developed as a rat poison in German-occupied territories during World War II. Once banned in the United States, a teaspoonful could kill dozens.

Compound 1080 is now used only sparingly in the United States but more widely in New Zealand to control outdoor predators and pests. Animal welfare groups and other environmentalists say it should again be outlawed because it kills too indiscriminately.

Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore., has asked the Department of Homeland Security to ban production of the odorless, tasteless poison for another reason: the belief by the FBI and others that Compound 1080 – the most toxic pesticide registered by the World Health Organization – could be used by terrorists to poison U.S. water supplies. There’s no known antidote.

Trying to hold on to a business started by his grandfather, Tull Chemical owner Charles Wigley defends his product as safe when used properly. Other chemicals could be just as deadly in the hands of terrorists, he argues, and someone else could start making the poison.

Besides, unknown quantities of the poison could be stored around the United States from decades ago, before production was regulated.

“If they shut me down it’s not like it’s going to just go away,” Wigley said.

Homeland Security spokeswoman Valerie Smith said the agency is reviewing Compound 1080, but it lacks the authority to ban production.

DeFazio previously asked the Environmental Protection Agency to shut down Tull Chemical because of safety problems at the company and the danger of its product, but officials refused. Neighbors of the factory weren’t surprised.

Lea Cheatwood has lived about 150 yards from Tull Chemical for decades, but she didn’t know what the company made until the early ’90s, when a neighbor obtained a copy of an EPA audit that cited numerous safety problems at the small plant, located about 50 miles east of Birmingham.

Since then, Cheatwood has spent hours watching the plant and keeping logs that document truck traffic from the site, located in a city of about 15,000 people. Cheatwood said local, state and federal officials all have ignored complaints that the company transports deadly chemicals in unmarked trucks, has virtually no security and sits on the bank of a creek that regularly floods.

“They all just say it’s not in their jurisdiction,” Cheatwood said. “It’s an extremely dangerous product, and it worries me it’s made in my neighborhood.”

Wigley said he follows the law and laces his poison with black dye that would show up if the chemical, an organic compound, got into either floodwaters in the neighborhood or – if used by terrorists – a public water reservoir.

“I haven’t been contacted by Homeland Security, but EPA visits a couple of times a year,” Wigley said. He accused the Oregon congressman of trying to make a name for himself with environmentalists by seeking the ban on Compound 1080.

“He’s talking about shutting down a plant in Alabama. They’re against outsourcing jobs, but he’s talking about outsourcing mine,” Wigley said.

Tull Allen, Wigley’s grandfather, started Tull Chemical in 1956 after purchasing the process to make Compound 1080 from Monsanto Co., which had made the poison at a nearby plant that later became infamous for polluting Oxford and nearby Anniston with PCBs, or polychlorinated biphenyls.

Compound 1080 originally was developed as a rat poison in Nazi-controlled territory in the 1940s, and some research indicates Nazis considered using it to kill people in Holocaust death camps before deciding it was too dangerous for guards, according to Brooks Fahy of the Oregon-based Predator Defense, which wants the poison outlawed.

The recipe made it to the United States, where the poison was used on rats and then at livestock ranches to kill coyotes and other predators.

Faced with complaints that the chemical was also killing eagles and other animals, the Nixon administration in 1972 banned the use of Compound 1080 for livestock protection. The Reagan administration reversed course in 1981, and the EPA said the poison could be registered for limited domestic use in poison-laced collars worn by sheep.

Government records show Tull Chemical closed for several years in the mid-1980s as the government considered whether to allow continued production of Compound 1080, but Wigley later reopened. He reinforced the buildings and installed a chain-link fence topped by barbed-wire after an EPA review noted inadequate security and other problems.

Wigley said he makes as much as five tons of the poison annually, with most of it being exported to New Zealand. He said his only U.S. customer is the Department of Agriculture, which said it uses less than four tablespoons of Compound 1080 annually in sheep collars. The collars kill coyotes by poisoning them when they bite an animal’s throat.

The poison collars are used in nine states, but the government said they only kill a couple dozen coyotes annually. It was once used in California, but voters there in 1998 approved a ballot resolution banning the use of Compound 1080 and another poison, sodium cyanide.

Environmentalists in New Zealand oppose the use of Compound 1080, which they claim kills slowly and painfully and can poison animals that feed on carcasses of its victims. Their protests are echoed in the United States by groups including the Predator Defense, which got DeFazio involved in the issue.

The head of the Oregon-based organization, Fahy, has twice visited Oxford to gather information about Tull Chemical and Compound 1080.

“It’s so dangerous there’s no legitimate use for it,” he said. “It is beyond belief that this place is operating and operating where it is.”

SOURCE

NZ’s 43K+ homeless can now sleep easy on their park benches as Mahia Rocket lab’s new partnership gears to protect us all from terrorists

Thanks to thecontrail.com for this link.

Rocket Lab to launch satellite with ‘defence’ applications to tackle terrorism from Mahia

A satellite with “security and defence” applications, due to be launched from Mahia, is expected to help security services across the globe intercept secret radio transmissions from terrorists and drug smugglers… NZ Herald

So Rocket Lab, already the recipient of $25million of your tax payer dollars Kiwis, is potentially playing a part in protecting us from the threat of terrorists,  sparked off by the inside job controlled demolition nine eleven. Yes it is set to “geolocate maritime radio to guard borders, protect assets and save lives.”  …geolocating “VHF transmissions from marine vessels to provide global activity-based intelligence data as a service.” The essential intelligence.

I am certain the 43K+ homeless NZers will be pleased that all of this money will be spent ensuring they will sleep easy in their cars and on park benches. 

The NZ Herald is reporting on the latest at the Mahia Rocket Lab on the East Coast of NZ….

“A satellite with “security and defence” applications, due to be launched from Mahia, is expected to help security services across the globe intercept secret radio transmissions from terrorists and drug smugglers.

Orbital launch provider Rocket Lab has signed a contract with Luxembourg-based satellite technology company Kleos Space to launch “scouting mission satellites” that will geolocate maritime radio to “guard borders, protect assets and save lives”.

The Kleos Scouting Mission (KSM) will form the cornerstones of a 20-system constellation that will geolocate VHF transmissions from marine vessels to provide global activity-based intelligence data as a service.

The Kleos Space constellation will detect radio transmissions and pinpoint their origin and timing, enabling governments and organisations to detect activity such as drug and people smuggling, illegal fishing and piracy, and also identify those in need of search and rescue at sea.

Built by GomSpace, the Kleos Space satellites are scheduled to launch on an Electron rocket from Rocket Lab’s Launch Complex-1facility in Mahia, in mid-2019.

“Small satellite technology like that of Kleos Space is increasingly playing a vital role in informing decisions on the ground that protect people and the environment,” Rocket Lab chief executive Peter Beck said.

“We’re thrilled to be partnering with Kleos Space to provide them with the rapid and reliable access to orbit needed to build and replenish small satellite constellations.”

The satellites will be integrated into Rocket Lab’s in-house designed and built Maxwell dispensers and deployed from the Electron kick stage to low Earth orbit.

Rocket Lab’s kick stage, powered by the 3D printed Curie engine, is designed to circularise small satellite orbits and perform complex manoeuvres, including multiple engine burns, to deploy many satellites into different orbits.

This provides unmatched mission flexibility, making it ideal for deploying and replenishing constellations.

https://thecontrail.com/profiles/blogs/aotearoa-enters-the-militarisation-of-space-at-mahia

Photo: Hawke’s Bay Today