Tag Archives: sugar industry

Sugar Coated — A Doco on How the Sugar Industry Managed to Dupe the World for Decades

Story at-a-glance

  • Thousands of studies spanning many decades show excess sugar damages your health, yet the sugar industry successfully buried the evidence and misdirected the public with manipulated science
  • “Sugar Coated” investigates the sugar industry’s once secret PR campaign, showing it normalized excessive consumption by deflecting evidence implicating sugar as a cause of ill health
  • The manufactured uncertainty and lack of scientific consensus is what has allowed the sugar industry to thrive while health statistics have tanked
  • A 2016 paper examined the links between funding and study outcomes. Of the 60 studies, the 26 that found no link between sugary drinks and obesity or diabetes were all funded by the beverage industry; of the 34 that did find a relationship, only one had received industry funding
  • Seventy-four percent of packaged foods contain added sugars, which hide under 61 different names, many of which are unfamiliar

By Dr. Mercola

Thousands of studies spanning many decades show excess sugar damages your health,1 yet the sugar industry successfully buried the evidence and misdirected the public with manipulated science. According to the sugar industry, sugar is a harmless source of energy and may even be an important part of a healthy “balanced” diet.

Dr. Cristin Kearns, a dentist and fellow at the University of California, made headlines when she published a paper2 detailing the sugar industry’s historical influence on dietary recommendations. Evidence also shows how the sugar industry influenced the scientific agenda of the National Institute of Dental Research (now the National Institute of Dental and Cranial Research), which back in 1971 created a national caries program, downplaying any links between sugar consumption and dental caries.3

The documentary, “Sugar Coated” — which features Kearns, investigative journalist Gary Taubes, author of “The Case Against Sugar,” and Dr. Robert Lustig, a leading expert on sugar metabolism and obesity — investigates the sugar industry’s once secret PR campaign, showing how it normalized excessive consumption by deflecting evidence implicating sugar as a cause of ill health. As noted in the film’s summary:4

“In order to continue sweetening the world’s food supply, thus securing continued profits, the sugar industry turned to the very same deceptions and tactics lifted from the tobacco industry. Using big sugar’s own internal documents on this strategy, ‘Sugar Coated’ reveals the well-oiled tricks of the trade to confuse the public about what is really driving the global pandemic of obesity, diabetes and heart disease.”

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2018/07/21/sugar-coated-documentary.aspx

Sugar industry quietly paid scientists to point blame at fat

sugar-485055_1280 (1).jpg

This is kind of shocking isn’t it? All these years we’ve been told no fat, when sugar is the greater culprit in ruining our health. We need to be vigilant … profits over people is the corporate mantra. Guard your health carefully & question everything. Remember too, sugar’s been labeled one of the building blocks of cancer.
EnvirowatchRangitikei


myeclinik.com  A newly discovered cache of internal documents reveals that the sugar industry downplayed the risks of sugar in the 1960s.

In the 1960s, the sugar industry funded research that downplayed the risks of sugar and highlighted the hazards of fat, according to a newly published article in JAMA Internal Medicine.

by Camila Domonoske

The article draws on internal documents to show that an industry group called the Sugar Research Foundation wanted to “refute” concerns about sugar’s possible role in heart disease. The SRF then sponsored research by Harvard scientists that did just that. The result was published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1967, with no disclosure of the sugar industry funding.

http://myeclinik.com/sugar-industry-quietly-paid-scientists-to-point-blame-at-fat/