Tag Archives: poison drop

NSW government dropping 1080 poison baits in Sydney water catchment area

EWR comment: The many who have tracked and even opposed the 1080 operations (moving along in NZ for over 50 years) know there is more to this than meets the eye. Particularly in latter years as increasingly the rules have expanded to allowing dispersion into waterways. How can this not affect human health? Look what happened in Auckland. On a grand scale we have also seen the gradual destruction of the very species the narrative has told us were being protected. Slowly but surely the wild food supplies are being severely reduced, and what is left is being rendered too risky to eat. This is not about conservation according to the UN’s supposed biodiversity goals contained in the Agenda 21 documentation. It is all part of the New World Order reset goals, world control of all resources including food. Note Aussie recently proclaimed they are now in the said NWO. So here we have Australia spreading 1080 into their waterways. Catchment waterways for Sydney.
The article is from MSN. (Thanks to Jordan for this link).

msn.com

The New South Wales government is preparing to drop poisoned animal baits into a part of Sydney’s main drinking water catchment considered so important, public access is restricted.

The move has angered a conservation scientist who says mass aerial baiting in the special area contradicts those protections.

However, the NSW government says the baiting is necessary to protect vulnerable native animals affected by the devastating bushfires of 2019/20.

The meat baits, which are laced with the poison known as 1080, are designed to kill foxes and dingoes — also referred to as wild dogs. They will be dropped across parts of the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area, including within the Warragamba Special Area.

Special areas act as buffers of pristine bushland upstream of dams and are designed to protect water quality. In the Warragamba catchment, “schedule 1 areas” are the most heavily protected and public entry is banned.

They are surrounded by “schedule 2 areas”, where entry is restricted and activities such as bike riding and motorboat use are prohibited.

But according to internal government documents, seen by the ABC’s Specialist Reporting Team, poisoned baits were airdropped in schedule 2 areas in June and July 2020, with more baits to be dropped this month.

Originally, the NSW Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) also wanted to bait schedule 1 areas, but it abandoned the idea over concerns about how the public would react.

“We anticipate that there is a risk of community concern regarding the perceive (sic) risks of using 1080 in Sydney’s drinking supply,” the NPWS noted in an email.

“For these reasons we are proposing we don’t bait in Schedule 1 lands. If we determine a way to manage that risk down the track, then we can reconsider.”

WaterNSW told the ABC it considered the baiting a “very low” risk to the catchment, thanks to other mitigating factors.

“These factors … include restricting baiting to areas away from waterways, the high rate of decay of ‘1080’ in the environment, and baiting occurring only in catchment zones far removed from the Warragamba supply storage,” a spokesman said.

Scientist argues dingoes should be protected

The Department of Planning Industry and Environment said the program had been carefully mapped out, and baits would not be dropped within 200 metres of waterways.

That does not reassure Kylie Cairns, a molecular biologist and geneticist who specialises in dingo research at the University of New South Wales (UNSW).

She is opposed to any baiting in national parks where dingoes roam, saying they are Australia’s land-based apex predator and should be protected.

“If you have the apex predator being controlled in such a manner, you could be disturbing or impacting negatively on the natural environment in that area,” she said.

Dr Cairns said since baiting was typically done to reduce the loss of livestock in agricultural areas it was “shocking” that baiting was planned up to 10 kilometres inside the world heritage area.

“You have to ask, is that really balancing the need to conserve dingoes in their environment … with the impact that they might be doing to livestock operations on the outside of the park?”

She said a growing body of work suggested habitats could be improved in areas where dingoes were well managed and, that in particular, dingoes helped keep kangaroo numbers down, which allowed plants and smaller herbivores to flourish.

Expert says baiting needed to control dingoes

Greg Mifsud is the national wild dog management coordinator at the Centre for Invasive Species Solutions. He supports the use of aerial baiting to access hard to reach areas. And he said it was more targeted than the name suggested.

“The movement of foxes and dogs in those landscapes after fire could be quite different and therefore targeting areas with aerial baiting just means you might be able to get a better uptake of baits by animals that you’re targeting,” Mr Mifsud said.

He was not involved in the program run in the Warragamba Special Area, but he does oversee the National Wild Dog Action Plan and provides advice to landholders and agricultural groups on predator control strategies.

Mr Mifsud said dingoes still posed a significant threat to wildlife and he argued regular baiting was needed because as soon as it stopped, they came back.

“Dogs aren’t going away,” he said.

“Despite the best efforts, they’ve adapted to the changes and they’re moving into areas, like … on the outskirts of Brisbane and places like that. So it’s really just going to be about ongoing management.”

Concerns over ‘cruelty’ and native animals

Mark Greenhill is the Mayor of the Blue Mountains City Council, which covers a large section of the world heritage area. He’s opposed to the use of 1080 because he thinks animals that ingest it die painful deaths.

“We can be more humane than that,” he said.

“My concern is that, apart from the cruelty of the poison, there’s no guarantee this poison wasn’t taking out native animals.”

This year, his council officially banned the use of 1080 in his government area. That ban does not cover land controlled by the state government, such as national parks, but he wished it did.

“The [Warragamba Special Area], while outside our local government area, is still within the Blue Mountains World Heritage Area. So, forgive me for feeling somewhat proprietorial,” he said.

A spokesperson for NPWS told the ABC it had seen a 90 per cent reduction in fox activity across the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area since it started baiting last year.

NPWS also said strict legal conditions surrounded aerial baiting and ensured human safety.

SOURCE:

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australia/nsw-government-dropping-1080-poison-baits-in-sydney-water-catchment-area/ar-AAOchHC?fbclid=IwAR3kZwqJeDcAr4iFMXewnea_h2_pvzMnkSijGr10twCABOmzulVaj2Qzbyw

Go into a 1080-poisoned forest, see for yourself says a NZ bushman of 35 years – non target birds are dying

NOTE: This is a burning issue in NZ currently, a nation advertised as clean and green is anything but. They are poisoning our environment with greater intensity under the guise of saving birds. Folk visiting here should be warned & not drink water from the streams as many tourists do. One tourist here died & her Doctor who arranged to send her heart for testing for 1080 was told to back off & the lab ‘lost’ her heart. Massive cover up going on. https://envirowatchrangitikei.wordpress.com/2016/10/06/could-this-healthy-23-year-old-have-died-from-exposure-to-1080-we-will-never-know-because-incredibly-the-nz-lab-lost-her-heart/
EnvirowatchRangitikei

From the Gisborne Herald

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

With regard to Grant Vincent’s comments on the benefits of 1080 poison. As a logging contractor and bushman for the past 35 years, I have seen my fair share of 1080 poison drops. Every year parts of the forest estate where I worked were systematically poisoned every three years.

In my experience this creates very low bird numbers, especially predatory birds like the falcon, morepork, weka and hawk. All these birds I have found poisoned after a 1080 poison drop.

1080 poison was first developed as an insecticide, so what effect does this have on the forest ecosystem as a whole? And then there’s the effect on poisoning our waterways which run down to our coastline.

New Zealand’s Department of Conservation, TBfree and many regional councils backed by Forest and Bird support the aerial use of 1080 poison which indiscriminately kills all creatures that breathe oxygen through a slow, painful death that can take some animals days.

Then there is the crusade to have New Zealand pest-free by 2050, which includes deer and pigs. If you hunt wild game to feed your family, as most of my workers do, be concerned as this will affect you!

As I have always said to people who ask me about the effects of 1080 poison — go into a forest which has been poisoned by 1080 and see for yourself. Listen if you can hear any birds, and you will notice the smell of death.

Mark Nyhoff

Pakiri Logging

 

READ COMMENTS ETC AT THE LINK

http://gisborneherald.co.nz/opinion/3124914-135/go-into-a-1080-poisoned-forest-see

For further independent science & info on 1080 see our 1080 pages at the main menu. You won’t find that info in mainstream media. Also search 1080 in categories at left of news page.

Mainstream media’s bias on 1080

“One study in 2013 followed 34 monitored Kea in a poison-drop area. Five of them were found dead after the drop, and analysis confirmed 1080 as the cause of death. That’s a mortality rate of nearly 15%…

… nowhere in the article was there mention of the Kea’s significant risk to 1080 poison…”

One instance when silence is not golden …

A letter to the editor of the Dominion Post points out quite clearly here that mainstream media is guilty of omitting the blatantly obvious in their reporting… misleading the public perception of the reality of 1080 poison. If you care to examine the research on 1080 (the independent research, not that of those who justify 1080 use) you will find some serious holes with some serious leakage.

Copy of kea article.jpg

 

 

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