Tag Archives: microbiome

Antibiotics increase risk of colon cancer, NEW study warns

(NaturalHealth365)  There are multiple risk factors for developing colon cancer.  So what causes it?  Over half of colorectal cancer cases are related to lifestyle factors, such as age, smoking, diet, and alcohol use.

Now, a recent study suggests a strong link between antibiotic use and colon cancer.  Why is this the case, and what does it mean for your health?  Most importantly, how can you reduce your risk of colon cancer?

Alarming study finds link between antibiotic use and colon cancer risk

A recent study from Sweden reveals a correlation between oral antibiotic use and the risk of colorectal cancer.  The study, published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, found that people who took antibiotic courses had up to a 17% higher risk of colon cancer than those who did not.

People who took antibiotics for six months or longer had the highest chance of developing cancer.  Still, even short antibiotic courses appeared to increase the chances of colon cancer.  Disease risk was also location-specific.

Researchers found a higher cancer risk in the ascending colon, also known as the proximal colon, which resides on the right side of the abdomen.  The ascending colon is the beginning of the entire colon.  This means it’s the most exposed to everything that comes through the small intestine, including oral antibiotics.

Why do antibiotics increase colon cancer risk?

Since antibiotic use is so widespread, these findings are alarming.  But the question is, what about antibiotics could be intensifying cancer risk?

The answer lies in the microbiology of the gut.  To maintain a healthy balance, an entire microbiome of good bacteria lives in your digestive tract.  And since antibiotics are made to kill bacteria, they can throw the gut microbiome out of whack.  Good microbes usually keep harmful bacteria in check.  But antibiotic use could contribute to the disruption of this natural order.

In turn, this could lead to detrimental inflammation in the digestive tract.  For instance, when harmful bacteria can gain prominence, it can result in biofilm formation.  Biofilms are structures formed when harmful bacteria join together within the colon wall.  Ultimately, oral antibiotics can knock out the good bacteria in your gut.  So although there’s no evidence that antibiotics directly cause cancer, there is a correlation caused by how these drugs affect your gut microbiota.

READ AT THE LINK

https://www.naturalhealth365.com/antibiotics-increase-risk-of-colon-cancer-recent-study-warns.html

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“STUNNING” study reveals: Making THIS simple dietary change improves gut microbiome, helps prevent inflammatory diseases

(NaturalHealth365)  Research confirms what natural health experts have insisted for years:  that the gut microbiome – the community of bacteria in the intestinal tract – plays a vital role in health.  Researchers say imbalances in this microbial community – alternatively known as dysbiosis – can trigger a laundry list of unwanted health conditions, including increased risk of obesity, autism, “leaky gut,” and inflammatory conditions such as arthritis.

Now, a new Stanford School of Medicine study suggests that one simple dietary “tweak” – enriching the diet with fermented foods such as yogurt, fresh sauerkraut, and kimchi – can improve the health and diversity of the microbes (or microbiota) while reducing levels of inflammatory enzymes in the body.  So let’s look at how fermented foods contribute to better health and disease prevention.

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https://www.naturalhealth365.com/fermented-foods-3419.html

Image by Benjamin Balazs from Pixabay

Fermented Foods May Lower Your Risk of COVID-19 Death (Mercola)

Story at-a-glance

  • Countries that consume higher amounts of traditionally fermented foods have lower COVID-19 mortality rates. According to German researchers, significant changes in the microbiome caused by modern life and low fermented food consumption may have increased the spread or severity of the disease
  • For each gram-per-day increase in the average national consumption of fermented vegetables, the mortality risk for COVID-19 decreased by 35.4%
  • A review of seven small clinical trials found probiotics and/or prebiotics may be helpful for those struggling with depression and anxiety
  • Two types of gut bacteria in particular, Coprococcus and Dialister bacteria, have been shown to be “consistently depleted” in individuals diagnosed with clinical depression
  • Gut bacteria associated with good mental health synthesize the dopamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, while those associated with depression produce γ-aminobutyric acid

READ MORE AT THE LINK

HERE: https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2020/08/06/fermented-foods-sources-consumption-and-health-benefits.aspx?cid_source=dnl&cid_medium=email&cid_content=art1ReadMore&cid=20200806Z2&mid=DM614249&rid=933545288

Image by hanul choi from Pixabay

Infant immunity Part 1 – Important information from Dr Suzanne Humphries on pregnancy, nutrition, vaccines, antibiotics & more

Published on Mar 23, 2015

In part one Dr Humphries discusses ‘the three year pregnancy’, the importance of epigentics, nutrition, the microbiome and the trouble with vaccines and antibiotics.
PARTS 2 & 3 TO COME