Tag Archives: iwi

A must see interview with Horowhenua’s Mayor about Hemp – by Vinny Eastwood

A very interesting interview here with the Mayor of Horowhenua Michael Feyen. It is about more than just hemp. Much discussion also around Local Govt and the changes that have come about. He also speaks to the corporatized former Govt departments something I’ve mentioned here for a long time. (Your local council, see at the link, is listed on Dun & Bradstreet). Very on topic in light of what we are seeing NZ wide with LG, and also enlightening on the hemp topic. Something I will be researching myself in the near future I’ve decided after watching this. For further info on the Horowhenua Council visit our LG Watch pages. Mayor Feyen is keen to promote employment opportunities in his district. He is also committed to Treaty Partnership.

http://brainfeed.tv/2018/10/09/mayor-michael-feyen-on-industrial-hemp-allcaps-podcast-10/

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Far North 1080 aerial drop called off following outrage from iwi over no consultation by DoC

“The meetings were more like “information sessions” … “At no time did they ever stand up to the iwi authority and say ‘do you agree to us dropping 1080 out of a helicopter onto this land. At no time.”

These are familiar words around NZ these days & a characteristic of Agenda 2030 (formerly Agenda 21). The method used in these meetings that as the person says are more like information sessions, are run using a special technique called the Delphi technique. The merely give the public the illusion of having been consulted. District Councils are using it also when they consult the public on their plans. They’re getting very gung ho in my opinion. Provide these scams of consultation then fire ahead and do what they planned to do all along. We’re seeing this time after time and opposing them is very difficult. Regarding iwi consultation/partnership, in the Horowhenua recently the local Council was seen via a leaked report, to have paid a local iwi a large sum of money to halt their objection to the council’s plan for partly treated sewage disposal on wahi tapu. A Crown tactic from time immemorial, find a complicit individual or group & by pass all the rest.

Here in the case of 1080 drops it appears not all iwi had been consulted. This matter was highlighted in June this year.

The article is from stuff.co.nz

The Department of Conservation has postponed a controversial 1080 aerial drop in the Far North following outrage from iwi who say they weren’t consulted.

A small group of Whangaroa residents obtained information from DOC under the Official Information Act after hearing about its plan for an aerial drop on the 2400 hectare Whangaroa forest for winter-spring of this year to reduce pest numbers.

Spokesperson Asha Anderson said when she shared the document with the community some were shocked to see their names listed as being ‘fully supportive’ of the plan.

“In fact, the opposite was true and some had actually spoken out against 1080 at DOC’s hui,” Anderson said. “This is a serious breach of trust, and included misrepresentation of a local trust and Treaty partner.”

READ MORE

https://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/local-news/northland/106724561/DOC-postpones-Far-North-1080-aerial-drop-following-outrage-from-iwi

Resistance to using 1080 grows in Far North: DoC has misled the public on operations costs, consultation & perceived support

The Department of Conservation’s plan for a 1080 aerial drop in public and private forests in the Far North later this year is meeting growing resistance.

Critics say use of the poison over more than 60 years has had devastating effects on wildlife, killing indiscriminately, inflicting an “extremely cruel and inhumane death” that often takes days. Locals for Responsible Conservation also argue that it poisons water, including sources used by people.

“Poisoned animals are left to rot in the forest and waterways, and remain toxic for many, many months,” a spokesman said.

“Dropping deadly poison over our environment is not an acceptable practice, and it is not sustainable.

“There are many alternatives that contribute positively to our communities and our employment opportunities that do not risk our health and our environment.

“We support sustainable, responsible conservation that benefits local communities and respects our environment, including all creatures great and small.”

Meanwhile a reply to an Official Information Act request from Locals for Responsible Conservation, received in March, raised more questions, glossed over the risks and showed that DOC had misled the public about the cost of the operations and local support for the drop, the group said.

A number of the groups listed as having been consulted said they had not been, while others had wrongly been cited as supportive.

http://www2.nzherald.co.nz/the-country/news/article.cfm?c_id=16&objectid=12073542

Why is HDC allowing the felling of a protected Totara tree on a formerly Council-owned Foxton property, by the new owners Willis & Bond / Compassion Horowhenua?

The Totara in question is on a property now owned by Willis & Bond / Compassion Horowhenua Housing. They are the new owners of Johnston Street community housing that was formerly Council owned. The tree to the right of the fence in the photo is to be cut back, that one is on Council property (Seaview Gardens). However the other tree to the left is to be felled. This native Totara is not currently listed as a ‘notable tree’, the only thing I understand that could prevent its being felled.  The by-laws apparently have recently changed in the Horowhenua preventing the species from being protected there. So how is this a forward move? Felling a protected native species? Have local iwi been consulted on this?

Copy of Jan 2018 015

It should in my opinion be cut back (for easier ongoing maintenance of the buildings if that is what is required) … but not felled. That is very backward thinking.

The following article reflects the direction Councils are taking in their professions of Treaty Partnership with regard to native trees. Their websites tend to pay lip service only to the Treaty. It is described in the article how the Auckland Council failed to support a rāhui placed on the Waitakere Forest to protect Kauri, another protected species.

“The council’s Environment and Community Committee chose to reject the rāhui request made byTe Kawarau-a-Maki, deciding instead to close only high-risk and medium-risk tracks.”

Read the article: Why aren’t people listening? Māori scientists on why rāhui are important

 

So it would appear the Horowhenua District Council is moving in a similar direction? With recent by-law changes the protected species is now set for the chop.

Note: I have requested of Council today (5th Feb) that the tree be made ‘notable’. They’ve referred my request to a ‘Strategic Planner’ to respond. Please consider requesting the same by sending an email to:

CustomerServices@horowhenua.govt.nz

EnvirowatchHorowhenua

 

 

 

Foxton Locals are Protesting – They’re Fed Up with the District Council’s Lack of Consultation Over Their Main Street

np-hikoi-180
Local people gathering on Monday for their peaceful protest concerning HDC’s lack of consultation with the community of Foxton

A Foxton tangata whenua representative, William McGregor, and other locals have organized a peaceful sit in at the town’s cenotaph. There is a lot of history behind this part of town which was the original Te Awahou settlement (Te Awahou is Foxton’s real name) . The local Horowhenua District Council has plans to move the cenotaph and do up the main street at the obscene cost of $1.6 million.

The people want the cenotaph to remain where it is. Council, in keeping with their plans, held a last minute blessing of the area last week in readiness for the moving day. This demonstrates the extent of their commitment to consultation. At that ceremony those officiating with regard to the blessing diplomatically acknowledged it was out of respect for those fallen in the wars and those buried there that they came.

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The last minute blessing organized by HDC last week

The Council is already in debt to the tune of $100+ million, according to two councilors, however Mayor Brendan Duffy claims the debt is only $68 million. Either figure, it is still too much and some wise spending is in order.

What the local people really want is clean water, however the Council claims the water if fine and the Mayor says on FB that he drinks it. It is in fact regularly a brown colour and is highly infused with chlorine, a known carcinogen. Chlorine of course is the sticking plaster for pollution that most DCs don’t want to spend money on cleaning up. Witness the fact we can no longer swim in 40% of our ‘clean green’ rivers.  The Horowhenua also has an horrific track record of disposing of its waste into the local waterways.

That aside, the point is, nobody (except a few shop owners apparently) wants the street to be narrowed with gardens replacing many parking spaces. Nevertheless, Council has already had contractors demolish the old Council building, old records and all. Antique books have been left lying in the rain where they fell.

So, the beef that locals have with the council is that people weren’t consulted. It’s said RSA was, however it turns out dozens of RSA members who’ve dropped by the protest claim they were not asked. They’ve also added photographs of the fallen soldiers onto the base of the cenotaph. I think Council are in for a rough ride and this is the price they pay for not consulting with the people they’re supposed to be working for.

A tent has been erected next to Ihakara Gardens for the protesters to stay in, and gifts of food and supplies have been pouring in from the public, including local businesses. They’re in for the long hall.

For as long as I’ve been following the lack of consultation issue over the street changes, our local representative in Council, Cr Michael Feyen, has said repeatedly he’s been left out of the consultation loop and in spite of requests has not been shown any plans for the street. Yesterday however, the HDC issued a press release replete with plans and history, and also denying the claims they’ve not consulted locals. The sit in organizers claim the details in the press release are simply not true. They are the tangata whenua and they know if they’ve been consulted or not. They haven’t. For further information on that visit Cr Michael Feyen’s FB page.

Although HDC’s website claims partnership & consultation with local iwi, it appears to be just lip service. This became evident with the Shannon waterways pollution & what ensued there. Little if any respect for tangata whenua.

Radio NZ has published an article on this … you can read it at this link.  

The latest news from Cr Feyen’s FB page at 5pm today is, Mayor Duffy and CEO Clapperton are at the site in discussions with the organizers. However, note, Foxton’s own District Councilor, their own representative, is not privy to that discussion. Not allowed.

So much for democracy & consultation. I rest my case. 

 

EnvirowatchHorowhenua


 

RELATED:

Foxton residents stage sit-in over cenotaph move

Community up in arms over cenotaph move

Horowhenua Environmental Health Watch