Tag Archives: health_benefits

Conifer Needle Tea with Pine, Fir or Spruce

From growforagecookferment.com

Making conifer needle tea is one of the best – and easiest – ways to use foraged conifer needles. Often called pine needle tea, this is a wonderful and simple way to use pine or other conifer needles medicinally. Ease your mind and heal your body with this delicious conifer tea!

What is Conifer Needle Tea?

There are many edible and medicinal uses for foraged conifer needles, and making a tea out of them is a wonderful use of their powers.

Often called “pine needle tea,” this warming drink is simply made with foraged conifer needles steeped in boiling water in order to ingest this lovely flavored and health-beneficial tea.

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https://www.growforagecookferment.com/conifer-needle-tea/

Photo: growforagecookferment.com

7 Health Benefits of Bee Propolis

Written By: GreenMedInfo Research Group

Bees make more than honey. They also make a waxy substance called propolis. And this “bee glue” is a powerful health balm. In fact, studies show it has anti-cancer properties

Dr. Seema Patel of the Bioinformatics and Medical Informatics Research Center, San Diego State University conducted a comprehensive review of the literature on propolis and cancer. Dr. Patel found laboratory and animal studies supporting propolis efficacy against cancers of the:

  • Brain
  • Pancreas
  • Head and neck
  • Kidney and bladder
  • Skin
  • Prostate
  • Breast
  • Colon
  • Liver
  • Blood

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https://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/7-health-benefits-bee-propolis

The health benefits of Swedes aka Rutabagas

Health Benefits of Rutabaga

Rutabagas are only called rutabagas in the U.S. Throughout the rest of the world, they’re known as swedes, neeps, Russian turnips or Swedish turnips.1 This ordinary root crop is thought to have originated in Bohemia in the 17th century as a hybrid between turnip and wild cabbage.2

Based on studies, crucifers, including rutabaga, were found to contain anticancer10 and antioxidant properties. Its most significant nutrient, vitamin C, provides oxidant-fighting and immune system-supporting functions that can help protect cells from free radical damage.11 Vitamin C also helps enhance iron absorption and collagen formation that may protect against cellular damage, encourage wounds to heal, fight infections and promote healthy bones, teeth, gums and blood vessels. Furthermore, rutabaga contains iron needed to produce healthy blood on a daily basis.12

Beta-carotene-rich rutabaga is also an excellent source of manganese (for energy)13 and potassium, and is rich in fiber, thiamin, vitamin B6 (helps support the nervous system), calcium (for strong bones), magnesium (helps absorb calcium and combat stress) and phosphorus (helps metabolize proteins and sugars). Below is a list of nutrients found in rutabaga with corresponding amounts:14

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https://foodfacts.mercola.com/rutabaga.html

Photo: pixabay.com

The health benefits of almonds

Crunchy, healthy and satisfying — almonds are bite-sized treats that are beneficial for health, which is why they’ve been popular for centuries in different parts of the world.

In fact, according to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the annual demand for almonds in America has increased by a whopping 400 percent since 1980.1

Almonds are quite versatile too, since they can be eaten in a variety of ways — from raw or roasted to sweetened or salted. But which variety of almond is actually the healthiest to munch on? Before you indulge on a handful of this crunchy snack, there are several little-known facts that you should know about almonds first.

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https://foodfacts.mercola.com/almonds.html

12 science-backed Ayurvedic herbs and spices with POWERFUL health benefits

(NaturalHealth365) Ayurveda is a traditional system of medicine that originated in India and is more than 3,000 years old.  It is an all-natural modality, using herbs and spices to prevent diseases and health conditions from developing in the first place.  By taking a whole-person approach, it focuses on balancing mind, body, and spirit for better health.

In fact, many Ayurvedic herbs have been studied extensively and now have solid scientific backing as effective remedies for many health conditions.

Ayurvedic herbs can improve your health in multiple ways

Ashwagandha

Several studies have shown that ashwagandha promotes healthy cortisol levels and normal inflammatory processes that occur in response to stress.  Cortisol is called the “stress hormone.”  By supporting a healthy stress response, ashwagandha can help lower levels of anxiety and improve sleep quality for people who suffer from anxiety and stress.

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https://www.naturalhealth365.com/ayurvedic-herbs-offer-powerful-health-benefits-3458.html

How do cucumbers benefit your health?

Cucumber is the fourth most widely cultivated “vegetable” in the world,1 related to both the melon and squash families,2 technically making it a fruit because it contains seeds.3 With its mild, refreshing flavor that mixes well with other garden offerings, cucumbers are 96% water,4 but still manage to provide many valuable health benefits.

Like many other plant-based foods, cucumbers originated in India,5 and were brought to the Americas by European explorers in the mid-16th century.6 There are dozens of varieties available, and they thrive best when they have plenty of sunshine and adequate moisture.7

While commercial cucumber-growing operations in Florida keep most of the country stocked with the fresh variety, Michigan is the biggest state producing cucumbers specifically for pickling, while Mexico is the largest  provider for the U.S.A. through the deepest winter months. China, however, is by far the most prolific supplier, with the next two being India and Russia.8

Cucumbers grow on a long, trailing vine,9 and come in two main varieties: slicing cucumbers, which are generally larger and thick-skinned; and pickling cucumbers, which are smaller and thinner-skinned.10 Pickling usually involves slicing and soaking in brine (highly salted water) or vinegar to preserve and ferment the fruit.11 For tips on growing cucumbers, read this guide.

An alternative is the longer, thinner English or gourmet cucumber, also known as “burpless” cucumbers. As the name implies, this variety is specifically bred to minimize burping because of its reduced cucurbitacin content.12 Seedless cucumber varieties are attained through a natural parthenogenesis process, which allows them to produce without pollinization.13

In the kitchen, you have several ways to prepare fresh cucumbers. They’re delicious when sliced and eaten with salt. Combined with chopped sweet onions in apple cider vinegar, salt and pepper, they provide a savory, summery side dish.

Health Benefits of Cucumbers

Grown wild throughout India,14 cucumbers are used as a traditional medicine to manage fever.15 They also have diuretic properties,16 and the juice is used as an acne cream and a soothing remedy for tired, puffy eyes.17 These uses led scientists to investigate cucumber fruit, seeds and extracts as an effective treatment in other areas of medicine.

Cucumbers are known to be an excellent source of vitamins, including anti-inflammatory vitamin K, infection-fighting vitamin C and phosphorus. Body-beneficial minerals include bone-building manganese, as well as calcium and magnesium.18

Lignans, unique polyphenols in crucifers and alliums such as cabbage and onions, are known for containing health benefits, such as possibly lowering the risk of heart disease.19 Moreover, one study showed that cucumbers contain powerful lignans that bind with estrogen-related bacteria in the digestive tract, contributing to a reduced risk of cancer,20 particularly breast cancer.21 The cucurbitacins — compounds that belong to the cucurbitaceae family — have anticancer potential as well.22

CUCUMBER NUTRITION FACTS
Serving Size: 3.5 ounces (100 grams), raw, with peel

 Amt. Per
Serving
 
Calories15 
Calories from Fat0 
Total Fat0.11 g 
Saturated Fat0 g 
Trans Fat  
Cholesterol0 mg 
Sodium2 mg 
Total Carbohydrates3.63 g 
Dietary Fiber0.5 g 
Sugar1.67 g 
Protein0.65 g 
Vitamin A 105 IUVitamin C2.8 mg
Calcium 16 mgIron0.28 mg

Studies Done on Cucumbers

In one study, cucumber extracts were screened for signs of free radical-scavenging and analgesic activities, following the lead of traditional folk uses. Not only were the extracts found to provide phytonutrients with these activities, numerous other valuable compounds were found, including glycosides, steroids, flavonoids, carbohydrates, terpenoids and tannins.23

Cucurbitacins in plants have already been identified as having pharmacological and biological benefits, including anticancer activities. But another study related more recent discoveries showing that cucurbitacin has a strong inhibiting effect on cancer-signaling pathways, which cancer cells require to survive and proliferate. The conclusion discussed the likelihood that cucurbitacin could be used as a future anticancer drug in clinical settings.24

Cucumbers Fun Facts

For those who have noticed that their cucumbers seem to deteriorate soon after refrigerating them, U.C. Davis has reported that cucumbers maintain freshness longer when stored at room temperature.26
Cucumbers are also highly sensitive to ethylene, a natural plant hormone responsible for initiating the ripening process in several fruits and vegetables. Be sure to separate cucumbers from bananas, apples, peaches, peppers and tomatoes because of the natural ethylene they generate.27

Cucumbers are also highly sensitive to ethylene, a natural plant hormone responsible for initiating the ripening process in several fruits and vegetables, so another recommendation is to store cucumbers away from bananas, melons, and tomatoes because of the natural ethylene they generate.

READ MORE & SEE RECIPES AT THE LINK

https://foodfacts.mercola.com/cucumber.html