Tag Archives: Gardening

‘Going to Seed’ – When your plants bolt and what to do about it (Wally Richards)

Plants have one objective in life and that is to reproduce.

Reproduction is mostly done by seeding (spore in ferns) but can be also achieved through division, suckering, cloning, producing bulblets or pups. The desire to reproduce is their strongest attribute which is one that can make gardening very difficult at times. (weeds, suckers, oxalis).

There are two basic forms of plants, one is called annuals because they germinate, grow, flower, seed and then die. The other type are perennials which live for a number of seasons or in the case of some trees thousands of years. There are inbetweens such as bi-annuals which for our purpose here we will not worry about them.

Perennials are fairly straight forward, they live, they flower, they produce seeds, they may produce off sets, suckers (new plants from their root system) all while they live for more than one season. They can have their foliage removed and survive to generate more foliage unlike an annual plant which if their foliage is removed the root system dies.

It is the annuals that we are going to talk about because as far as I am aware they only reproduce naturally by seeding.

(They can in some cases be grown from cuttings which in Nature if a bit of their foliage falls onto a suitable bit of dirt they could produce roots and become a clone of their parent plant.) Annual plants are very aware of the current growing conditions and as far as I can figure they have a reasonable insight on what the conditions are likely to be in days to come. Seeds will not germinate in Nature till the conditions are right which means temperatures in both soil and air along with adequate moisture. If the temperatures are right in summer but its too dry to germinate nothing happens till the soil moistens up sufficiently.

A day of rain changes the moisture level and the seeds laying dormant germinate (which includes weeds).

Two possible events may occur then; one is that further rain or your watering follows and the plants/weeds grow up tall and strong and when maturity is reached they produce flowers and seeds. The other possibility is there is no more rain and the soil dries, the plant/weed has only grown a few inches and it will realize that it is becoming too dry and immediately mature, flower and set seed before it dies. This is where you will see lots of baby weeds in dry areas flowering their hearts out to seed before they wither in the dry conditions. Their seed falls on to the dry dusty soil to wait for the next moist time to germinate and start the cycle all over again. From this we learn that annual plants or ones we call weeds when they encounter stress or checks in their growing they will feel that their lives are threatened and go to seed. We call this ‘Bolting’ and you will see the term bolt resistant which means the particular species will tolerate a bit of stress before going to seed.

When it comes to non fruiting vegetable plants we want them to reach maturity without going to seed prematurely. So our cabbages, lettuce, silverbeet, celery etc will produce good plants to harvest and eat. If left after maturity they will eventually go to seed. What we don’t want is the same plants to go to seed before they reach maturity. Some vegetables are very prone to bolting unless the growing conditions are perfect from the time they germinate to the point of maturity. One such plant is Pak Choy which I have found easily bolts at the merest check of growth.

Thus we have the gardening problem of bolting. If we are growing our own seedlings for planting out and we nurture the plants from germination to planting out by giving them adequate direct sun light, sufficient moisture for sustained growth (not drowning them) and we prick them out without damaging the roots after ‘hardening off’ and provide the young plants with good growing conditions we have great success.

If we fall down and the plants get into stress then later on they will likely go to seed. We call this a ‘check’ in their growth it could have been caused by becoming too dry, too hot, too cold, too soft and insufficient direct sun light.

When we buy vegetable seedlings we don’t know if they have suffered stress or not during their short lives to date. The nursery that grew them doesn’t usually make mistakes as its their income that suffers if they do so. Instead they give the plants optimum growing conditions and then harden them off before transporting to a retailer.

Hardening off is very important; when grown in a glasshouse where every thing is controlled the foliage of the seedlings is soft and if shoved straight out into the real world they are likely to die or suffer stress. To overcome this the seedlings are transferred to special houses where they are protected but gradually exposed to the elements.

An alternative is to spray them with Vaporgard to protect the soft foliage and they can then be hardened up quickly. When the seedlings reach a retail outlet they are often placed under cover where they can become soft again. Watering is a problem if they don’t receive sufficient for their needs. As the seedlings are bigger now and they have large root zones filling the cell pack or punnet they can dry out very quickly and may require watering more than once in a day.

The chances of being stressed before they are planted out in your garden have increased. If the plants are indoors out of natural light or in bundles they are soft and stressed. You plant them out and they lay down on the soil like left over road kill and they struggle to stay alive and grow. Then you wonder a few weeks later why they have gone to seed before they were ready to harvest. Vegetable plants that produce fruit such as tomatoes and capsicums there are no problems as you want them to seed/fruit and as long as they have not got too old in the pots they will likely be fine.

With flower plants the bigger the better and no worries about whether they have been stressed or not. When purchasing foliage type vegetables try to buy nice small young plants in cell packs (least root disturbance) so you can take them home and grow them on to plant out later.

A day before planting out spray the seedlings with Vaporgard over and under foliage this acts as a stress guard and reduces transplant shock, protects the plants from the elements and reduces moisture loss through foliage. Instead of laying down you plants will sit up and start growing much quicker in their new situation.

If you place Crop Cover over them with hoops you will protect the plants from birds, cats, insects and the elements. They will grow just about twice as fast which means you will be enjoying your own home grown vegetables much sooner. This allows you to re-plant and have more harvests during the growing season.

Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food!

Note: you can peruse Wally’s pages/sites here below. Further, if you want to ask him a question about your garden (or any glitches you may encounter) by phoning him at the 0800 number. For Kiwis, he’s local. That’s a real bonus. EWR

Phone 0800 466464
Garden Pages and News at www.gardenews.co.nz
Shar Pei pages at  www.sharpei.co.nz
Mail Order products at www.0800466464.co.nz

Image by 👀 Mabel Amber, who will one day from Pixabay

Regrowing vegetables from your kitchen scraps

Watch at the link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qnBV6X1_Ph0

Self Sufficient Me 1.39M subscribers

In this video, I show you what happens when you regrow vegetables from kitchen scraps in the garden. I plant out scrap onion, lettuce, potato, celery, cabbage, tomato, and carrots and we see how they grow over 3 months. Support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/selfsufficientme (the top tier $25 AU enables mentoring from yours truly via an exclusive VIP email where I will answer your questions etc ASAP). My second channel: https://bit.ly/331edDu Using the links below also helps support my channel: Help support the Channel and buy a T-shirt/Merchandise from our Spreadshirt shop: https://bit.ly/3lmqMkr or Teespring https://bit.ly/3neEYO8 Go here to get Birdies Raised Garden bed in the USA: https://shop.epicgardening.com/ and use SSME2020 for a 5% discount. In Australia & New Zealand go to https://birdiesgardenproducts.com.au/ or https://birdiesgardenproducts.co.nz/ and use Code SSMEbird for a 5% discount. Check out http://www.gardentoolsnow.com/ for tools such as the Prong I recommend to use. Shop for plants or garden equip on eBay Australia: https://bit.ly/2BPCykb Blog: http://www.selfsufficientme.com/ (use the search bar on my website to find info on certain subjects or gardening ideas) Forum: http://www.selfsufficientculture.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/self_suffic… Facebook: https://bit.ly/2Zi5kDv Twitter: https://twitter.com/SufficientMe Subscribe to my channel: http://goo.gl/cpbojR Self Sufficient Me is based on our small 3-acre property/homestead in SE Queensland Australia about 45kms north of Brisbane – the climate is subtropical (similar to Florida). I started Self Sufficient Me in 2011 as a blog website project where I document and write about backyard food growing, self-sufficiency, and urban farming in general. I love sharing my foodie and DIY adventures online so come along with me and let’s get into it! Cheers, Mark 🙂

Gardening & Plant Immunity (Wally Richards)

Wally Richards is a longtime Kiwi gardening guru. I used to post his useful and excellent material earlier in the piece … I’ve neglected the food growing aspect for some time now though aside from the odd article. It seems an appropriate time now to return to it with the much announced coming food shortages. My and my parents’ generations and beyond always grew their own anyway … until supermarkets took over. We knew then what exactly was in our food.

Wally is local to NZ so Kiwis can benefit from his wide knowledge of local conditions. You’ll find further info at his links at the end. You can sign up and receive his regular newsletters. EWR


Gardening Articles for week ending 2nd October 2021

Plants, just like ourselves, have built in protection against diseases though their immunity systems.

We build up our immunity naturally over the years by surviving disease attacks and by having a healthy nutritionally rich diet.

That is not to say that we are immune to disease attacks but under normal situations we can fend off most health problems if we have very good health.

We, like plants, have pathogens and viruses in our bodies all the time but these are kept in check by our immune system and glands.

If we get into stress then our metabolism does not have the same stamina and we catch a cold or worse.

It is said the leading cause of heart disease and cancer is stress.

I think its the stress that is the straw that breaks the camels back, after unhealthy living, insufficient nutrient rich food and a build up over time of toxins in our cells and body fat due to not detoxing..

The same applies to plants, place them into stress and they will more likely catch a disease.

I have written a lot in the past on how to build the health of plants by building the health of the soil; having soil that is rich in humus, minerals, earth worms and soil life.

Even when we have the best soil on earth, plants can still catch a cold when they are placed into stress.

We can however increase the immune systems of plants by monthly sprays of Perkfection Supa for roses and other plants.

The active ingredient of Perkfection is ‘Phosphite ion’ or Phosphonic Acid. (Potassium ions are also present).

Perkfection is very safe to handle and spray and when used on food crops there is no withholding period other than your normal washing of produce before eating.

Perkfection is used extensively by commercial growers of vegetables and fruit as its safe, effective, in prevention and control while not restrictive on exports of produce.

We have suggested Perkfection Supa for Roses and Other Plants as an alternative to more toxic sprays, for the assistance in recovery from/or prevention of, the following problems, Black spot, Downy Mildew, Phytophthora Root rot, botrytis, Canker, heart rot, damping off, crown rot, leaf blight, silver leaf, late blight, collar rot, pink rot, brown rot, Armillaria, and gummy stem rot.

Now that’s a big list of common plant diseases which means that many of your disease related problems can be overcome with applications of this product.

Besides using Perkfection over your roses for the likes of Black spot and Downy mildew you can also use it as a spray over all your fruiting plants and trees including your strawberries.

It can be used also over your potatoes, tomatoes, lettuce, beans, cubits (cucumbers etc) lawns, onions, passion fruit, Cauliflowers, cybidium orchids and ornamental plants and vines.. In fact there is no where you cannot use Perkfection to advantage.

Being ‘Synthetic Organic Phosphates’ what you are doing, is placing this valuable material, onto the foliage of your plants, where it is very readily absorbed and transferred through the whole of the plant.

This fortifies the plant’s cells, increases the plant’s immune system and makes your plants less susceptible to invading pathogens.

There is however a down side, as with any good thing, you can use too much and the recommendation is to use Perkfection at 4 ml per litre of spray once a month for about 6 times in a season.

(Note a season is the normal period of time for that crop or plant. Roses are from Spring till Autumn. Most annuals 5-6 months.)

The reason is that, you can over load your plant with organic phosphates causing a clogging of the cells and halting growth until the system clears.

If a plant has a problem spray the first month with Perkfection at 7 mls per litre.

For plants you wish to fortify use at 4ml per litre for 2 to 3 months.

Prevention is better than cure and by spraying your plants in the spring you give the greatest protection to leaves and fruit, autumn spray will give greatest protection to roots and tubers.

I have suggested that on the 1st of the month to spray your roses and other preferred plants with Perkfection, MBL (Magic Botanic Liquid) and Mycorrcin. Then 14 days later (15th) spray with Mycorrcin and MBL.

What we are doing is boosting the plant’s immune system, supplying a large range of minerals and elements, feeding the beneficial microbes to increase their populations which also work to eliminate diseases.

If insects problems occur then include Wallys Super Neem Tree Oil with Wallys Super Pyrethrum added.. All these sprays are compatible.

Here are a few examples of situations where Perkfection Supa has made a big difference;

Buxus, from early damage to nearly dead plants, sprayed monthly the plants recovered their foliage and are now thriving after 6 months.

Silverleaf on roses and fruit trees caught in the earlier stages, remove damaged branches and spray with Perkfection.

Dry Berry on berry fruit including strawberries (other name is downy mildew) a couple of sprays usually does the trick.

Grapes spray once there is a good show of leaves then repeat monthly for about 3 times to assist in prevention of botrytis.

I have a guava tree which after several years of excellent fruiting it suddenly developed a disease that badly effected the fruit.

A few other gardeners also reported the same problem so I contacted the nursery that propagate the trees and asked the head nurseryman about it. He named the disease (which I forget what it was) and told me that they treat the problem with a chemical spray.

Knowing me fairly well he said that he did not know what I could use as I was against harmful chemicals.

So that season when the guava was starting to produce new growths in the spring I sprayed it with Perkfection and again every month while the fruit were growing.

The result was a tree full of fruit and no sign of the previous problem.

Wet weather diseases on citrus and plants that do not like wet feet can be helped to recover with the use of Perkfection.

It will help stimulate new root development.

It would also be a good idea to clean up the rot in the roots with a soil drench of Terracin followed by a drench of Mycorrcin 3 weeks later.

Terracin is a natural product that suppresses pathogens in the soil allowing the beneficial microbes to increase which means there is a fight for food resources and the now large numbers of beneficial microbes win.

Isn’t life simple when you work with Nature instead of destroying it with man made chemicals.


Phone 0800 466464
Garden Pages and News at www.gardenews.co.nz
Shar Pei pages at  www.sharpei.co.nz
Mail Order products at www.0800466464.co.nz

Image by staszwizg from Pixabay

Building a Potato Tower with Aly’s Self Sufficient

Watch at THE LINK

Grow your own veg. I’ve just discovered this NZ channel by Aly Cook… read below & sub for good ideas to be self sufficient.

Aly is also a musician, she released a song recently called ‘Hello Hello, Welcome to the New Revolution’ … featured at EWR, you can listen to it here, and hear her story AT THIS LINK.

Description

“Kia Ora my name is Aly Cook I live in Aotearoa (New Zealand) it is one of the more isolated countries on this beautiful planet , something that makes me thankful everyday as I feel it is a privilege to be born and raised in such an amazing place. I love to Garden and do things in an upcycle way, use the things that could go into landfill in a positive way, grow spray and free chemical free veges in containers, cook yummy vegan food, preserve fruit and live in a sustainable way as much as I can. So I hope you enjoy this journey with me . Please subscribe so you can see when my new videos appear.”

Image by Orhan Can from Pixabay

“Growing your own food is like printing your own money”

Growing your own food is like printing your own money”…Ron Finley

I touched on this topic recently. We’ve been hearing about shortages for ages now (check out the Ice Age Farmer at the link) & remember Bill Gates & Co want you eating their GM fake excuse for food so they can control your supply. Just do what we used to do before the supermarkets showed up. We purchased a few items from the local store & the rest we grew. We all had veggie gardens & fruit trees. Then there were the chooks and their eggs. It’s all very achievable. Our forbears did it. So can we. Check out our gardening page with many videos there for ideas. Search Youtube … it’s a veritable treasure trove of good ideas from growing in your apartment to tubs to back yards if you have one. Food didn’t always come from a grocery store. If you are a Kiwi (or even not) sign up to Wally Richards’ site & get his monthly newsletter. He’s a mine of Kiwi do-it-yourself experience & you can even phone him with your questions.

Phone 0800 466464
Garden Pages and News at www.gardenews.co.nz
Shar Pei pages at  www.sharpei.co.nz
Mail Order products at www.0800466464.co.nz

EWR

Our page, ‘Grow Your Own’:

https://envirowatchrangitikei.wordpress.com/grow-your-own/

Image by EM80 from Pixabay

With a world-wide controlled demolition of the global food supply going on – consider growing your own!

Note: grow your own food. It can be done even with little space. Search the net for ideas. People grow food in small apartments and on city rooftops. The sky’s the limit. EWR

Remember this?

and this?

A few links to get you started: My apartment garden tour; Apartment Balcony Edible Garden; Grow a lot of Food in Small Spaces with Container Gardening …. also check out our gardening pages (not featured greatly in recent years but very relevant now!)

_________________________________________________________________________

From markrispinmiller.com

“Better stock up, as something’s happening to the supply chain for our food. (This no doubt relates to Gates’ investment in lab-grown meat.)

In light of all those other “accidents,” that NZ cattle ship capsizing near Japan demands a closer look than the New York Times would ever give it”: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/04/world/asia/cattle-ship-capsized.html

Article link: https://www.sott.net/article/440719-Ice-Age-Farmer-Report-Food-supply-spontaneously-combusting-Controlled-demolition-of-supply-chain

SOURCE

http://markcrispinmiller.com/

Image by Pexels from Pixabay

A NZ gardener living her self-sufficient dream in central New Plymouth

Here’s a great post I found today in mainstream, Stuff to be exact. It features a short video & many images. I’d had a quick search for easy ideas on composting/disposal etc of kitchen waste &  found some fantastic info on growing your own food etc which I used to do but not so much now for many reasons. For people struggling to buy food you can grow it, even in small apartments or with very little or no ground. Search on YT you’ll find heaps of ideas. Anyway it may interest you this one, about a gardener in New Plymouth. I’ll post the composting one shortly. EWR

 

Meet the gardener living her self-sufficient dream in central New Plymouth

The first time Dee Turner visited the central New Plymouth property on which she now lives, it was very nearly the end of an open home.

With no time to spare, she ran past the real estate agent standing at the door with a clipboard and headed straight into the garden. After a quick turn around the one-acre space out back – which included plenty of flat areas, a few gentle slopes, a small stream and even a remnant of native forest – Dee was convinced it was the right property for her.

“So I rang the real estate agent I’d been working with and said I’d found the place I wanted to buy,” says Dee, who had been looking for the right property for more than a year by then. “And she said, ‘What do you think of the house?’ and I said, ‘Oh I haven’t been inside yet’.”

READ MORE

https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/homed/garden/110958186/meet-the-gardener-living-her-selfsufficient-dream-in-central-new-plymouth?rm=a

How a Harvard Doctor caused the death rate & medication costs to plummet in a nursing home for the elderly

In my opinion this has always been a no brainer. How are our elderly who have often lived active and happy lives, supposed to ‘rejoice’ when they are suddenly plucked from all things familiar & forced (yes frequently against their will without consultation as to their wishes) to live in a ‘dorm’ of sorts with complete strangers? All activities they enjoyed gone. It is surely a no brainer that they need something to do, not just be expected to sit and stare at the walls? Well this wonderful Doctor had the residents dressing themselves and taking an interest in life. To wake in the morning & wonder if the lettuces you just planted are growing, or if the cats have been and dug them up are all about purpose and a reason to get up. How many folk have I seen after admission to these mausoleums suddenly decline and pass on. Hope is a powerful motivation. Well here we have a working example of the success of providing just that. EnvirowatchRangitikei

 

from econewsmedia.org

Based on a hunch, he persuaded his staff to stock the facility with two dogs, four cats, several hens and rabbits, and 100 parakeets, along with hundreds of plants, a vegetable and flower garden, and a day-care site for staffers’ kids.

Dr. Bill Thomas, a Harvard trained physician, wants you to know one very important thing about life and aging: “growing older is a good thing.”

He’s been in the news quite a bit regarding his somewhat radical, yet very positive, first-hand perspective of aging. A Washington Post article featured this one man crusade to change negative attitudes about aging and help people to think of “post-adulthood” as a time of enrichment:

“Thomas believes that Americans have bought so willingly into the idea of aging as something to be feared that it has become a self-fulfilling prophecy leading to isolation, loneliness and lack of autonomy,” the article stated. In 1991, Thomas became the medical director of a nursing home in upstate New York. He found the place, as the Post put it, “depressing, a repository for old people whose minds and bodies seemed dull and dispirited.”

In 1991, Dr. Thomas found himself the medical director of a nursing home in upstate New York and in the words of the Washington Post article, he felt the place a: “depressing, a repository for old people whose minds and bodies seemed dull and dispirited.”

So, what did Thomas do to change the resident’s lives forever and spark a movement in aging? The Washington Post explains“[Dr. Thomas] decided to transform the nursing home. Based on a hunch, he persuaded his staff to stock the facility with two dogs, four cats, several hens and rabbits, and 100 parakeets, along with hundreds of plants, a vegetable and flower garden, and a day-care site for staffers’ kids.

READ MORE

http://econewsmedia.org/2017/12/05/harvard-doctor-changing-nursing-homes-forever/

We Can Go Back to Eden & See How Nature Provides Generously

fruits-386758_1280.jpg

From myeclinik.com

If you were born and raised in urban centers and find gardening a herculean task, understand that you don’t need to break your back at all, if you know what nature wants, and how it works for you. Understanding how Nature works will definitely reduce the effort of producing good food for one’s table.

When watching the documentary below, just replace “god” with Nature, and you’ll be okay. Just focus on the method and principles that you need to know.

The featured documentary, “Back to Eden,” reveals a simple organic gardening method that not only can transform your personal garden, but may even be part of the food solution needed on a global scale.

It is estimated that even if only 10% of the global population will do natural methods of gardening, the combined yield would be enough to feed those who have no direct access to farms. Not to mention the effect on the prices of organic foods when there’s abundance of them in the market.

Source: We Can Go Back to Eden & See How Nature Provides Generously

Wally Richards’ Weekly Column: This Week, WHO’s latest announcement on Glyphosate

Here is Palmerston North’s gardening guru Wally Richards’ weekly garden news & commentary. Wally gives us his thoughts on the latest findings from WHO … “Glyphosate probably causes cancer”. This latest revelation from WHO along with Canterbury University’s findings were presented to the RDC last Thursday, however they remain unconvinced and the status quo remains regarding the liberal use of Roundup (active ingredient is Glyphosate) in Rangitikei’s public spaces. (Remember, this is also sprayed on pastures so glyphosate has to be in our meat and milk!). Read Wally’s articles and further research on the topic. You can sign up for his weekly article, and phone him on the toll free number provided if you have any gardening queries. You can also email him with queries (details at the end of the article). His website is a mine of useful information.

Gardening Articles for week ending 4th APRIL 2015
Written by Wally Richards.

GARDENING CHEMICALS RAISING HEALTH CONCERNS

The news this week coming from the World Health Organisation (WHO) stated that glyphosate the active ingredient in Roundup (and found in other weed killers), ‘probably’ causes cancer.

There has been mounting evidence of this from various science reports and findings over the last few years.

All of which Monsanto denies as they did in the past with Agent Orange as being safe.

The health problems came to light in Vietnam when Agent Orange (and similar) herbicides were used to defoliate jungles causing servicemen and local populations major health issues..

On the 21st March 2015 (The Guardian article said) – Roundup, the world’s most widely used weedkiller, “probably” causes cancer, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has said.

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) – WHO’s cancer agency – said that glyphosate, the active ingredient in the herbicide made by agriculture company Monsanto, was “classified as probably carcinogenic to humans”.

It also said there was “limited evidence” that glyphosate was carcinogenic in humans for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

Monsanto, the world’s largest seed company, said scientific data did not support the conclusions and called on WHO to hold an urgent meeting to explain the findings. “We don’t know how IARC could reach a conclusion that is such a dramatic departure from the conclusion reached by all regulatory agencies around the globe,” said Philip Miller, Monsanto’s vice-president of global regulatory affairs.

Concerns about glyphosate on food have been widely debated in the US recently, and contributed to the passage in Vermont last year of the country’s first mandatory labeling law for genetically modified food.

The US government considers the herbicide to be safe. In 2013, (Based on information supplied by Monsanto’s scientists) Monsanto requested and received approval from the US Environmental Protection Agency for increased tolerance levels for glyphosate.

Monsanto will fight this tooth and nail because of the many millions of dollars the company makes every year from selling this herbicide.

In March, 2015, 17 experts from 11 countries met at the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC; Lyon, France) to assess the carcinogenicity of the organophosphate pesticides tetrachlorvinphos, parathion, malathion, diazinon, and glyphosate (table). These assessments will be published as volume 112 of the IARC Monographs.1

In NZ already we see that some of the above chemicals have already been removed or restricted by EPA and ERMA. Which is very good but there appears to be no controls or restrictions on glyphosate.

We do not even test for the chemical in our food chain and I am sure that if we did the results would be alarming.

Glyphosate does not disappear when it hits the soil (Which was another lie Monsanto told when Roundup was first introduced) Instead it has a soil life of months or years dependent apon what research

you read or on what soil type.

One thing would appear certain is that if land is cleared using glyphosate at the recommended rates and a food crop is planted then that produce will have glyphosate traces in the foliage and even larger concentrations in root crops.

Farming practices that Monsanto recommends make matters even worse; this includes killing pasture grass with glyphosate and immediately putting stock into graze. (Likely spraying while stock is there)

In dairy this means that glyphosate would be in milk, cheese and all by products.

Does Fontera test for glyphosate? I dont think so but it is an interesting question. It could likely mean that traces of glyphosate would be in baby formula?

Then its also in your meat from farm produced stock. The health of the stock is very likely affected also.

As I wrote back in February, Monsanto also encourage farmers to use Roundup as a desiccant, to dry out all of their crops so they could harvest them faster. So Roundup is now routinely sprayed directly on a host of non-GMO crops, including wheat, barley, oats, canola, flax, peas, lentils, soybeans, dry beans, carrots, parsnips, onions, potatoes and sugar cane.

To sum up there is very likely a lot of glyphosate in your food chain coming in small amounts from all those foods we normally eat and no one tests for the chemical!

A few parts per million in your potatoes, onions, meat, breakfast cereals, milk, cooking oils, bread, carrots, sugar etc. Add it up for one day’s meals and maybe thats a lot of parts per million? We do not know because glyphosate is assumed safe according to our Govt departments who presumably only relate to what Monsanto says to the FDA. The fox is guarding the chickens.

Here are some facts:

Glyphosate is a broad-spectrum herbicide, currently with the highest production volumes of all herbicides. It is used in more than 750 different products for agriculture, forestry, urban, and home applications. Its use has increased sharply with the development of genetically modified glyphosate-resistant

crop varieties. Glyphosate has been detected in air during spraying, in water, and in food. There was limited evidence in humans for the carcinogenicity of glyphosate.

Case-control studies of occupational exposure in the USA, 14 Canada,6 and Sweden 7 reported increased risks for non-Hodgkin lymphoma that persisted after adjustment for other pesticides.

The AHS cohort did not show a significantly increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

In male CD-1 mice, glyphosate induced a positive trend in the incidence of a rare tumor, renal tubule carcinoma. A second study reported a positive trend for haemangiosarcoma in male mice.

Glyphosate increased pancreatic islet-cell adenoma in male rats in two studies. A glyphosate formulation promoted skin tumors in an initiation-promotion study in mice.

Glyphosate has been detected in the blood and urine of agricultural workers, indicating absorption.

Soil microbes degrade glyphosate to aminomethylphosphoric acid (AMPA).

Blood AMPA detection after poisonings suggests intestinal microbial metabolism in humans. Glyphosate and glyphosate formulations induced DNA and chromosomal damage in mammals, and in human and animal cells in vitro.

One study reported increases in blood markers of chromosomal damage (micronuclei) in residents of several communities after spraying of glyphosate formulations.

Bacterial mutagenesis tests were negative. Glyphosate, glyphosate formulations, and AMPA induced oxidative stress in rodents and in vitro. The Working Group classified glyphosate as “probably carcinogenic to humans”

One of my pet thoughts is the great number of people that have allergies these days compared to say 50 years ago before glyphosate. The chemical in the food chain could well be the cause of a number of these health conditions.

Here is an interesting thought, where trade agreements that allow companies to sue countries if legislation used to protect the populations reduces the profits the company had being making!

Why not have the reverse where a company that supplies a product/chemical that is found to be harmful later on, then that company is totally liable for all the costs involved to that country.

That might have a few chemical companies and pharmaceutical companies change their ways.

Latest news; glyphosate also causes antibiotic resistance in harmful bacteria like Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

My personal opinion, its the worst gardening chemical currently for gardeners health.

Problems ring me at 0800 466464 (Palmerston North 3570606)
Email wallyjr@gardenews.co.nz
Web site www.gardenews.co.nz