Tag Archives: Fresh

Living Off Your Own Garden For Beginners

Whilst the world in various parts is in lockdown why not ponder on the value of growing your own food? This was the norm in my childhood, in fact you were the exception if you didn’t have a veggie garden and fruit trees. Thing too is, you won’t be dependent on corporations to eat. Now that’s a good thing. And you can grow veggies in tubs, indoors (google that) or on your section. Last note, NZ (for Kiwis) has its own gardening guru Wally Richards. He has a website called Garden News & believe it or not, an 0800number so you can phone him for advice. I did that just recently after moving house to learn how to treat the  previously sprayed garden plot (yes Roundup!!… highly toxic … yes they lied) before planting any food there. (Links to Wally’s two websites below the article) Note also, there is a garden page here at the main menu, I just have not updated it for a while but worth a visit .. EWR

From the ‘Vegan Sustainability’ magazine:

There is a huge growing trend in people wanting to become more self-sufficient, where living off your own garden can provide enormous health and environmental benefits.

The following is a beginner’s guide, with information on how to get started, and a few tips and tricks to make growing your own food easy!

Deciding Where to Grow

Vegetables grow best where it is sunny, so choose carefully when you are deciding where to plant. You can always add shade for more delicate crops such as salad and fruit bushes.

The majority of soil found in gardens will suit vegetable growing. However, if your soil is shallow, full of stones or clay rich, which will be cold and wet in winter, build raised beds or plant in large pots.

veg2

Dealing with Pests

One advantage of growing your own produce is the avoidance of pesticides and therefore you will want to deal with slugs and snails naturally.

Keep the plot clear of weeds and leaves and put a paved or soil path between beds, so you or the birds can spot pests easily.  Check out this link for tips on non-violent pest control in the garden.

Preparing the Soil

Before you start planting you should turn the soil over and remove weeds, roots and stones. This helps to prevent weeds returning and improves drainage. Some gardens will suffer the blight of perennial weeds and in this case cover the soil with newspaper and add a layer of compost about 5cm in depth.

READ MORE

http://vegansustainability.com/living-off-your-own-garden-for-beginners/

WALLY RICHARDS’ WEBSITES:

https://www.0800466464.co.nz/

http://www.gardenews.co.nz/


Photo 2: vegansustainability.com

Photo 1: Image by jf-gabnor from Pixabay

Kiwis everywhere are growing their own food again

Up until the 1950s folks grew their own food as a matter of course. It was what you did. Supermarkets kind of changed that but folks are catching on to the fact that processed foods are frequently devoid of nutrients and our fresh produce is sprayed liberally with toxic chemicals bringing with them a myriad of health risks. The financial squeeze is also a motivating factor and people are getting their fingers in the soil and producing their own food for cheap.

Here are some examples of that in the North Island, one is in the far North, and another in Hawkes Bay, both beautiful warm regions for growing things. A third I noticed recently on Facebook in Palmerston North, closer to home, illustrating the wonderful value of communities getting together and growing food… and sharing. That’s how our forbears used to do it.


North Hokianga Food Co-op aiming for food security

SARAH HARRIS (stuff.co.nz)

Brother and sister Joe Thompson and Jackie Thompson are encouraging people to grow their own food and be self-sufficient.

“Brother and sister Joe Thompson and Jackie Thompson are encouraging people to grow their own food and be self-sufficient.” (Photo courtesy of Stuff.co.nz)

“North Hokianga residents are on the path to making their food pantries and larders entirely self-sufficient.

The North Hokianga Co-op aims to get residents growing their own produce and wants to build a boutique abattoir to process local meat.

Co-op organiser Jackie Thompson says the area wants to make the most of their natural resources and change attitudes towards food and where it comes from.

The Co-op held a “Kai Rangatira” day on October 10 to introduce the community to gardening methods and information. More than100 people turned out to learn about grafting, worm farms, traditional Maori medicine, honey and housing projects.

“Food comes from the supermarket, from over the counter in a package. We’re eating too much sugar and too much processed food. That is basically seen as normal….”

Read more:  http://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/local-news/northland/72995508/north-hokianga-food-coop-aiming-for-food-security


Aunty’s Garden

Published on Oct 9, 2015 (video at Tim Whittaker’s channel on Youtube)

“This is a short clip of Auntys Garden in Hastings. An amazing place to get fresh vegetables. Price = koha ..”

http://www.tim.co.nz
http://www.photodrone.co.nz

Posted on Facebook comments explain that the garden is  at “Waipatu Marae just before Whakatu in Hastings. It is a community garden that any one can get produce from. Payment is in form of a koha. Anyone is also welcome to go and help in the garden..”


Finally the Crewe Community Garden in Palmerston North have as their vision: “… to create a vibrant community hub whereradishes-788554_1280 neighbours are collectively involved in various sustainable living initiatives that provide healthy food, encourage social connections, and reduce family food budgets. A community garden achieves many of the goals that the group have.”

They also have a blog spot with the same name here
(Palmerston North (aka Palmy) is in the lower / central North Island.)
Check them out here on Facebook
There are many more of these ventures around the country, these are just three … really inspiring.

EnvirowatchRangitikei

Living in a food desert

poor-330395_1280Here is more evidence that the poor don’t matter in a market driven capitalist environment. In a wealthy environment you have your food delivered or you drive to the shop. In a poor neighbourhood you either walk for miles or take a bus and can carry home only a small amount. These neighbourhoods typically have no shortage of liquor outlets or fast food stores. Ever enterprising predatory capitalists always milk the poor of the little they do have. The result of course is poor health. In this doco we see a grocery store has become a dialysis centre & no fresh food stores for three miles… “an epidemic” they say …  “a global problem” …

EnvirowatchRangitikei


Published on Mar 4, 2015
VSUOfficialChannel on Youtube

“Across Virginia – from Hampton to Richmond, Petersburg to
Lynchburg to Wise County and all points in between – approximately 17.8 percent of Virginia’s population live in food desert. This documentary was produced by VSU as part of a study on food insecurity in the College of Agriculture.
(Produced by Jesse Vaughan & Cedric Owens – Co-Producer Dr. Jewel Hairston – Narrator Daphne Maxwell Reid)”