Tag Archives: Food

Asparagus and how they can benefit your health

Asparagus officinalis belongs to a large genus of plants grown for ornamental purposes, though it’s is one of the few members of this family that’s cultivated for food.1 Since its domestication, asparagus has become a favorite for its sweet flavor and tender quality, which allows it to be prepared in various ways.2 You can steam, poach, roast or add a handful of its stalks to soups and frittatas for added texture.3

Health Benefits of Asparagus

Aside from its delectable taste, asparagus offers numerous vitamins and minerals, including calcium, folate, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium and vitamins A, K and C. It also contains trace amounts of niacin and vitamin E.4 It’s obvious that asparagus leads the pack in both the range and amount of nutrients it supplies. Because of these nutrients, adding asparagus to your diet may offer the following benefits:

  • Supporting cardiovascular health — In a 2017 study from Nutrients, it was stated that numerous vegetables (including asparagus) may protect and support heart health. This may be due to the high amounts of dietary fiber and vitamins in this vegetable.5
  • Aiding in fetal development — As one of the best plant-based sources of folate, asparagus may help lower the risk of miscarriage and neural tube defects in unborn children.6
  • Lowering osteoporosis risk — Asparagus contains considerable amounts of both vitamin K and calcium, nutrients essential in maintaining bone health. Adequate levels of vitamin K in the body ensures effective absorption of calcium, lowering the risk for bone fractures.7

READ AT THE LINK

https://foodfacts.mercola.com/asparagus.html

Dealing with bugs and pests in the garden

This is the time of the year some of a gardener’s bug enemies get out and cause damage. I have had my first phone call this week in regards to grass grub beetles eating the foliage of plants. The beetles are nocturnal, they will come out at dusk to mate and feed, lay eggs during their short life span. One beetle might consume a few leaves but hundreds and even thousands start to become a biblical plague.

I remember a few years ago about this time a lady phoned me with a sad story. She had purchased a horticultural block of land with hundreds of blueberry plants which she had figured out; that the income from the harvest would cover her mortgage repayments. What she had not calculated on was the block being surrounded by paddocks which were full of grass grubs. The beetles were out in their thousands feeding on the blueberry foliage and shredding the plants.

What to do?

When this happens in towns; plants get eaten at night and there is no sign of any culprits in daylight hours then it is beetles that are doing the damage. Take a torch after dusk and go check the plants that are being eaten for the beetles. When you see them then spray them directly with Wallys Super Pyrethrum at commercial strength. That is 2.5 mils per litre of water. It is a strong knock down affecting the pest’s nervous system and killing them.

You need to go out each night to check and spray till after a few nights there are no more beetles. If you are not able to go out then just before dusk, spray any target plants with Wallys Super Neem Tree Oil with the Super Pyrethrum added. When the beetles arrive later on they will get a dose of Neem when they feed and also have contact with the pyrethrum so a double whammy.

There is another way to control the beetles because they are attracted to light. This is an old method where you set up a strong light inside a window facing out to the area you want to control. Under the window you place a wall paper trough or similar against the bottom of the window pane. The trough is half filled with water and a little kerosene added to float on top of the water. The beetles fly at the light hit their heads on the window pane and they drop down into the trough below. The kerosene prevents them from climbing out and next day you can either feed the beetles to the chickens or flush them down the toilet. Have your light trap working every night until there is no more activity.

A more modern way is what butchers in days gone by used to have to zap flies; but a modern compact version of those zappers. I purchased one recently to use indoors for flies. It is a Sansai Insect Killer SK-120C. Put that into Google and you will find a number of suppliers in NZ around the $50 price. Plug into the power and the UV tubes light up which are the light that attracts flies etc and the grid is electrified static electricity. Any pest coming towards the grid gets executed.

Now this could be used outside in a weather proof situation as you do not want to mix electricity with water/rain. Also ideal to use for mosquitoes and sand flies if outside having a BBQ. It will also incinerate untold moths and any other flying night insects. Likely it will be zapping away most of the night so next day you can unplug and clean up the burnt bodies.

Another pest that will appear about now is the pear-slug or cherry slug. It is a black slimy looking slug that feeds on the foliage of cherry and pear trees and is the larva of the sawfly. The first infestation is often not noticed because the numbers are often few but the second infestation later in January/February period is large and damage to the foliage is certainly seen. Being a slug like pest they are controlled by sprays of Wallys Liquid Copper with Raingard added

So check your trees for them and if seen spray. If you can eradicate the first wave of them then there will be few to cause damage later on.

For other pest insects now is the time to get on top of them before they can breed masses of their offspring. Whitefly, leaf hoppers, scale, thrips, mites, caterpillars, etc. Fill up your sprayer with Wallys Super Neem Tree Oil combined with Wallys Super Pyrethrum to spray any and all target plants just before dusk. You can add to this spray Magic Botanic Liquid if you want to also promote healthier plants.

If you do this say every two weeks before problems start to arise or if already a problem them once a week till you have control. Settled weather means population explosions.

Happy Gardening.

Phone 0800 466464
Garden Pages and News at www.gardenews.co.nz
Shar Pei pages at  www.sharpei.co.nz
Mail Order products at www.0800466464.co.nz

Photo: pixabay.com

Persimmons and what they are good for

It’s too bad Americans aren’t more familiar with persimmons, since its botanical name means “food of the gods.”1 Highly adaptable to various climate conditions,2 those found in larger grocery stores are most likely Japanese persimmons. Persimmon is Japan’s national fruit,3 although it’s said to be native to China4 (American persimmons are mostly ornamental).

Persimmon seeds first came to the United States when commodore Matthew Perry sent them from Japan in 1856. Today, persimmons are grown in a plethora of varieties in China, Burma, Northern India and Australia. In the U.S., it grows in Southern and Southwestern states, predominantly California.5

Persimmons are red-brown or orange fruits that grow on trees like plums and look like a small, rather flat tomato capped by a calyx.6 The two varieties are astringent and nonastringent, the latter being pleasingly sweet. To avoid bitterness, the paler varieties should be eaten only when very ripe, usually peeled.7

READ MORE

https://foodfacts.mercola.com/persimmon.html

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The importance of Phosphorous to the soil in your garden (Wally Richards)

Phosphorus stimulates budding and blooming.

Plants need phosphorus to produce fruits, flowers, and seeds. It also helps make your plants more resistant to disease. Phosphorus doesn’t dissolve like nitrogen.

The soil will hang onto phosphorus, not releasing it into water.

Phosphate is needed by all life forms but if taken in too greater quantities it becomes harmful.

In the distant past phosphorus was obtain from manures especially bird or bat droppings called guano.

Phosphorus was also obtained from Reactive Rock Phosphate which is a hard phosphatic rock. In most soils it dissolves very slowly.

To make the rock phosphate more readily available to plants man discovered a process of using sulfuric acid, early in the 1900’s and a new agricultural fertilizer was created called Super or Super Phosphate.

It became a boon to agriculture and farming with tons of Super been spread to cause fast growth in fields and crops.

Unfortunately like a number of discoveries such as DDT and Asbestos, there was a hidden price to pay.

Super phosphate kills soil life and with their demise leads to unhealthy plants.

Not only that, it was also found that Super laden plants and grasses caused health problems in stock including cancers.

I read a very interesting book a long time ago called ‘Cancer, Cause and Cure’ written by an Australian farmer, Percy Weston.

Percy observed the results of the introduction of Super on his farm and the problems that occurred.

The book made me reconsider the use of Super in garden fertilizers.

Now days I would never use a chemical fertiliser or chemical sprays including any herbicides anywhere on my property.

But I have noticed that even though I obtained good healthy crops and plants, there is some factor that appears to be missing and the crops are not as lush as I feel they could be.

I have often thought that I am not getting sufficient phosphorus in my composts and mulches.

This caused me to do a bit of research on the Internet and found to my delight a company in New Zealand who make a product called BioPhos.

They take the rock phosphate and break it down naturally with micro organisms making it as readily available to plants as Super is.

The company sent me an email booklet and it showed trials that proved that not only did BioPhos work as well as Super, but actually better as it did not have a ‘peak’ growth on application and gave a much longer sustained release of phosphorus to plants.

Instead of killing soil life it actually supplies new micro organisms to the soil which carry on breaking the natural phosphorus down, meaning that only one application is needed per year unless you are cropping during the winter as well.

Some rose growers and rose societies recommend using BioPhos for better, healthier roses.

BioPhos contains phosphate, potassium, sulphur and calcium at the rates of P10:K8:S7:Ca28. BioPhos is Bio Certified for organic growing.

It is pH neutral and used at the following rates; new beds work in 100 grams per square metre, the same with lawns but water in to settle.

Side dressing plants; seedlings 8 grams (a teaspoon full) around base of the plant or in the planting hole. Same for potatoes (which do well with phosphorus)

Sowing beans peas etc sprinkle down row with seeds. Roses and similar sized plants 18 grams or a tablespoon full around plant or in planting hole.

Established fruit trees etc, spread at the rate of 100 grams per square metre around drip line or where feeder roots are.

Apply to vegetable gardens in spring and a further application in autumn if growing winter crops.

Can be applied to container plants also. Apply to tomatoes when planting or side dress existing plants.

When you obtain your BioPhos you will notice it consists of fine powder to granules with pellets of sulphur and odd splinters of wood.

These including the wood are all part of the product not messy packaging.

The lumps of granules actually contain 4,888,000 fungal colonies to aid the breakdown and enhance your garden soils.

If you have concerns about your health, the health of your family and you want to avoid illnesses such as cancer if possible, then grow as much fruit and vegetables as you can without chemicals.

BioPhos is biologically manufactured using an internationally patented thermophillic composting technology.

Natural products: whole filleted fish nutrient, microbes, inoculum, phosphorous rock and limestone are used to create highly available soil and plant food.

• Plant available phosphate

• Biologically activated lime

• Essential minerals and trace elements

BioPhos contains phosphate, potassium, sulphur and calcium at the rates of P10:K8:S7:Ca28.

BioPhos is Bio Certified for organic growing.

It is pH neutral and used at the following rates; new beds work in 100 grams per square metre, the same with lawns but water in to settle.

Side dressing plants; seedlings 8 grams (a teaspoon full) around base of the plant or in the planting hole. Same for potatoes (which do well with phosphorus).

 Sowing beans peas etc sprinkle down row with seeds. Roses and similar sized plants 18 grams or a tablespoon full around plant or in planting hole.

Established fruit trees etc, spread at the rate of 100 grams per square metre around drip line or where feeder roots are.

Apply to vegetable gardens in spring and a further application in autumn if growing winter crops.

Can be applied to container plants also. Apply to tomatoes when planting or side dress existing plants.

Photo: pixabay.com

How do cucumbers benefit your health?

Cucumber is the fourth most widely cultivated “vegetable” in the world,1 related to both the melon and squash families,2 technically making it a fruit because it contains seeds.3 With its mild, refreshing flavor that mixes well with other garden offerings, cucumbers are 96% water,4 but still manage to provide many valuable health benefits.

Like many other plant-based foods, cucumbers originated in India,5 and were brought to the Americas by European explorers in the mid-16th century.6 There are dozens of varieties available, and they thrive best when they have plenty of sunshine and adequate moisture.7

While commercial cucumber-growing operations in Florida keep most of the country stocked with the fresh variety, Michigan is the biggest state producing cucumbers specifically for pickling, while Mexico is the largest  provider for the U.S.A. through the deepest winter months. China, however, is by far the most prolific supplier, with the next two being India and Russia.8

Cucumbers grow on a long, trailing vine,9 and come in two main varieties: slicing cucumbers, which are generally larger and thick-skinned; and pickling cucumbers, which are smaller and thinner-skinned.10 Pickling usually involves slicing and soaking in brine (highly salted water) or vinegar to preserve and ferment the fruit.11 For tips on growing cucumbers, read this guide.

An alternative is the longer, thinner English or gourmet cucumber, also known as “burpless” cucumbers. As the name implies, this variety is specifically bred to minimize burping because of its reduced cucurbitacin content.12 Seedless cucumber varieties are attained through a natural parthenogenesis process, which allows them to produce without pollinization.13

In the kitchen, you have several ways to prepare fresh cucumbers. They’re delicious when sliced and eaten with salt. Combined with chopped sweet onions in apple cider vinegar, salt and pepper, they provide a savory, summery side dish.

Health Benefits of Cucumbers

Grown wild throughout India,14 cucumbers are used as a traditional medicine to manage fever.15 They also have diuretic properties,16 and the juice is used as an acne cream and a soothing remedy for tired, puffy eyes.17 These uses led scientists to investigate cucumber fruit, seeds and extracts as an effective treatment in other areas of medicine.

Cucumbers are known to be an excellent source of vitamins, including anti-inflammatory vitamin K, infection-fighting vitamin C and phosphorus. Body-beneficial minerals include bone-building manganese, as well as calcium and magnesium.18

Lignans, unique polyphenols in crucifers and alliums such as cabbage and onions, are known for containing health benefits, such as possibly lowering the risk of heart disease.19 Moreover, one study showed that cucumbers contain powerful lignans that bind with estrogen-related bacteria in the digestive tract, contributing to a reduced risk of cancer,20 particularly breast cancer.21 The cucurbitacins — compounds that belong to the cucurbitaceae family — have anticancer potential as well.22

CUCUMBER NUTRITION FACTS
Serving Size: 3.5 ounces (100 grams), raw, with peel

 Amt. Per
Serving
 
Calories15 
Calories from Fat0 
Total Fat0.11 g 
Saturated Fat0 g 
Trans Fat  
Cholesterol0 mg 
Sodium2 mg 
Total Carbohydrates3.63 g 
Dietary Fiber0.5 g 
Sugar1.67 g 
Protein0.65 g 
Vitamin A 105 IUVitamin C2.8 mg
Calcium 16 mgIron0.28 mg

Studies Done on Cucumbers

In one study, cucumber extracts were screened for signs of free radical-scavenging and analgesic activities, following the lead of traditional folk uses. Not only were the extracts found to provide phytonutrients with these activities, numerous other valuable compounds were found, including glycosides, steroids, flavonoids, carbohydrates, terpenoids and tannins.23

Cucurbitacins in plants have already been identified as having pharmacological and biological benefits, including anticancer activities. But another study related more recent discoveries showing that cucurbitacin has a strong inhibiting effect on cancer-signaling pathways, which cancer cells require to survive and proliferate. The conclusion discussed the likelihood that cucurbitacin could be used as a future anticancer drug in clinical settings.24

Cucumbers Fun Facts

For those who have noticed that their cucumbers seem to deteriorate soon after refrigerating them, U.C. Davis has reported that cucumbers maintain freshness longer when stored at room temperature.26
Cucumbers are also highly sensitive to ethylene, a natural plant hormone responsible for initiating the ripening process in several fruits and vegetables. Be sure to separate cucumbers from bananas, apples, peaches, peppers and tomatoes because of the natural ethylene they generate.27

Cucumbers are also highly sensitive to ethylene, a natural plant hormone responsible for initiating the ripening process in several fruits and vegetables, so another recommendation is to store cucumbers away from bananas, melons, and tomatoes because of the natural ethylene they generate.

READ MORE & SEE RECIPES AT THE LINK

https://foodfacts.mercola.com/cucumber.html

Encourage your children to garden (Wally Richards)

We need to encourage our children and grandchildren to appreciate Nature by including them in some gardening activities.

I believe that young children have a natural affinity with plants and insects when they are allowed to explore our gardens.

Children learn many things by mimicking their parents and are often keen at a young age to assist in various gardening activities.

I remember as a toddler spending many hours in the garden collecting caterpillars off the cabbages and feeding them to our chickens.

I was given my own little spade and wheelbarrow when I was about three and had a lot of fun moving the weeds my mum cleared from gardens to the compost bin or to feed them to the chickens.

I can still remember how good it felt to be part of Nature back then and the same feeling pertains today when I work or wander around gardens.

It was about that time, when I was given my own little plot of ground to grow plants in.

Seeds would be planted and I would be taught which seedlings were weeds and which were plants.

My own little watering can would nurture the baby plants till maturity. A great ado would be made when one of my cabbages, silverbeet or lettuces was harvested for the evening meal.

Even though I hated eating silverbeet back then, I had to enjoy my own grown silverbeet, because I grew it!

It was the fuss that the adults made, that gave me a feeling of importance and likely kept me gardening for the rest of my life.

Plants that move have a fascination for children and a great one for this is Mimosa pudica, the Sensitive Plant, which folds up its leaves when touched. They are easy to grow from seed, as a pot plant for a windowsill.

Nice pink flowers also. As the plant matures it has thorns on the branches which incidentally are another attraction for children.

Cacti with their prickles often appeal to young boys and I had a small collection when young and still keep a few.

Two awesome plants for children to grow are the super giant sunflowers and pumpkins.

Called ‘My Giant Sunflower’ these extra tall sunflowers will grow up to 5 metres tall.(17 odd feet) Grown in full sun in soil that has excellent drainage and lots of manure.

The giant pumpkin is called ‘My Giant Pumpkin’ and these monsters can weigh over 1000 pounds at maturity. (Half a ton)

Another interesting aspect is to encourage the children to give their giant plant a personal name after it is established.

Naming the plant makes the giant more personal and helps the children to have respect for plants and nature.

If I was going to grow either of these giants, here is what I would do: In an all-day-sunny area, I would dig a hole about a spade depth and width,

chop up the bottom of the hole, so the soil is loose, then fill the hole with chook manure to about two thirds full.

(Other manure could be used if chook manure is not obtainable, but chook is best).

Fill the rest of the hole with a good compost and soil mix, 50/50 making a small mound about 12cm tall above the filled in hole.

Place one seed in the middle of the mound and wet it down with Magic Botanic Liquid (MBL), (20 ml of MBL to 1 litre of water.)

Water the mount to keep moist with plain water and then every 2 weeks with the MBL.

Overseas the biggest record vegetables have been achieved with products very similar or the same as MBL. Spraying the foliage of your Giants every 2 weeks with MBL

(10 ml to a litre) will also assist in a bigger healthier plant.

After your pumpkins are established and growing well, give them a drink using Cucumber Booster, once a week.

This is a high nitrogen product that is a combination of sulphate of ammonia and potassium nitrate, which you diluted in water.

Cucumber Booster is excellent for any plants that enjoys a boost of nitrogen after establishment. It is used for growing cucumbers, pumpkins, zucchini and gourds.

The MBL and Cucumber Booster can be combined for watering into the soil near the base of the plant.

Because of the weather patterns we are experiencing, after you plant your seed, cut off the base of a 2 to3 litre plastic fruit juice bottle and place this over the mound,

with the cap removed. This will give your seed and seedling its own little glasshouse.

This is removed once the seedling starts to fill the bottle and needs more room. With the Giant Sunflower a tall strong stake should be put in the ground at seed planting time on the edge of the mound.

This will be needed later to give extra support to the plant.

Another interesting thing to do is once the sunflower gets up about a metre tall, plant 3 or 4 climbing bean seeds at the base of the plant.

These will grow up the sunflower and also provide extra nitrogen for the sunflower.

It is a lot of fun plus a great way to get the children way from the TV and video games, showing them there is more to life than a screen.

Some garden centres run competitions for the tallest sunflower and the biggest pumpkin with various prizes for the winners.

AROUND THE GARDEN

Aphids are likely to be found on your roses at this time and they can easily be controlled with a safe spray of Super Pyrethrum and Wallys Neem Tree Oil combined.

Spray very late in the day just before dusk to obtain the best results.

Stone fruit trees that had the curly leaf disease will now be producing new leaves free of the problem.

The damaged leaves will fall off over time. You can if you like, spray the newer leaves weekly with molasses at rate of a tablespoon per litre of water with

Magic Botanic Liquid Added.

This can help save some or all of the crop.

Codlin Moths will start to be on the wing about now so obtain a pheromone trap from your garden centre so you can monitor the best time to spray.

A number of gardeners have found that a spray of Neem Tree Oil with Raingard added over the young apples, applied about 5-7 days after an influx of moths into the traps,

has resulted in only a very small scar on the mature apple, where the grub took its first and only bite. The same can be used on all fruit that guava moths attack.

Tomatoes should be doing well if in a sunny, sheltered spot. Only remove laterals on a sunny day when it is not humid or moist.

Spray the wound immediately with Liquid Copper to prevent disease entering the wound resulting in the possible loss of the plant.

Ensure that the tomato plants are well supported on stakes during windy times.

If you are concerned about blights spray the plants with Perkfection as a preventative, once a month. The same applies for your potatoes.

For general health of any plants, especially roses and food crops, a two weekly spray of MBL and Mycorrcin works wonders. Spray both the soil and the foliage.

Avoiding the use of chemical sprays and fertilisers is a must for healthy plants.

I have a saying that if you work with Nature, you will have great gardens, if you try to work against nature, you have chemical warfare.

Happy, Healthy Gardening.

Photo: pixabay.com

Blood clot RISK: This unique compound in grape seed extract helps to protect your circulation

(NaturalHealth365) For many, working from home is now the “new normal.”  And, for millions of Americans, this means long hours seated at a desk.  Believe it or not, while excessive sitting hardly seems like a dangerous activity, it actually presents a serious risk to health.  In fact, the threat is so severe that health experts are now characterizing prolonged sitting as “the new smoking.”

Sitting for long periods of time – whether at a desk, in a car, or on a plane – raises the risk of deep vein thrombosis, which occurs when a blood clot forms in a vein deep within the body (usually, in the leg).  In a life-threatening complication, the clot can break loose and head for the lung, where it can cause a potentially fatal pulmonary embolism.

READ MORE

https://www.naturalhealth365.com/proanthocyanidins-in-grape-seeds-3750.html

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Identifying those hazardous food additives (EWG)

A new EWG guide brings attention to food additives, commonly found in many processed foods, that can increase the risk of cancer, harm the nervous system, change the body’s hormonal balance and affect the immune system.

We’re publishing the guide because the Food and Drug Administration’s regulatory approach to food additives does not consider the latest science on the health harms caused by additives that may be legally added to processed foods manufactured in the U.S.

Some of the chemicals highlighted in the guide are not allowed for use in food in the European Union, including potassium bromate, a carcinogenic bread additive, and brominated vegetable oil, a flavor stabilizer used in beverages that can harm the nervous system.

READ MORE

https://www.ewg.org/research/food-additive-science/

Note: all of our CV related info is now posted at our sister site https://truthwatchnz.is/

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Fast food DISASTER: Industrial chemicals found inside many samples, NEW study

(NaturalHealth365)  If you love fast food like nearly 37% of the United States population who eat it a day, you may be consuming industrial chemicals.  That is exactly what a study published by George Washington University recently found.

The study examined the top fast food chains in the country by purchasing 64 fast food items from establishments in the San Antonio, Texas area, including Chipotle, McDonald’s, Domino’s, Burger King, Taco Bell, and Pizza Hut.

Upon testing their samples, the researchers found small amounts of harmful chemicals called phthalates in most food samples.

READ MORE

https://www.naturalhealth365.com/industrial-chemicals-fast-food-3442.html

Dr. Sebi: The Man Who Cures AIDS, Cancer, Diabetes and More

By Carolanne Wright

Contributing Writer for Wake Up World

“Meet Dr. Sebi, a pathologist, biochemist and herbalist. He came to the U.S. from Honduras and is on a mission to heal humanity. As it happens, he has been curing some of the most deadly diseases on the planet for almost 30 years. AIDS, cancer, diabetes, lupus and epilepsy are just a few of the ailments he has completely reversed. In fact, he is so committed to his work that he took on the Attorney General of New York in a Supreme Court trial — and won….The judge presiding over the case requested that Dr. Sebi provide one witness for each disease he claimed to have cured. When he instead furnished 70 witnesses to support his argument — showing without a doubt that he did in truth heal all the diseases listed in the ad — the judge declared the doctor not guilty on all counts…” 

READ MORE

https://envirowatchrangitikei.wordpress.com/2015/08/30/dr-sebi-the-man-who-cures-aids-cancer-diabetes-and-more/

IT STARTS WITH SEEDS … and how to save them (Wally Richards)

We’re a week behind with Wally’s newsletter. This is from last week, so this week’s will follow shortly. EWR

Nearly all plants start with seeds and the main functions of any plant is to reproduce itself by all means possible, which with many plants means flowering and seeding.

Think about that for a moment; the only purpose of a plant is to reproduce, it does not grow for show, to be eaten, to bathe in sun light, to convert carbon dioxide into oxygen, to provide health benefits.

They do all those things but as far as the plant is concerned it just wants to produce more of its own species and with each generation in a natural setting to become a stronger better specimen. If all conditions to grow in are good then a plant will germinate from seed slowly move to maturity and then flower to produce seeds and die if an annual, or have a rest if a perennial, to repeat again flowering in its next cycle.

A few such as bananas, no longer produce seeds in its fruit though you can see where the seeds used to be in the cross section of some bananas. By the way there are over a thousand different types of bananas in 50 sub groups. Bananas sucker or produce off sets which over time would form a clump. Gardeners break up clumps and plant separately each sucker. Bananas flower and as the flower emerges it produces ‘hands’ which are the banana fruit-to-be.

As gardeners your most important job is to either encourage seeds from the plants that you want and prevent seeds on any plants you do not want. When a plant’s life is threatened it will immediately go to seed even if it is still a baby plant. We see that in summer in waste areas such as gravel driveways where weed seeds germinate and grow and if there is not going to be any rain for some time (plants know this) they will quickly go to seed while there is still enough moisture to do so before they dehydrate and die. They are only a small replica of what they would be in better conditions. The seeds will remain in the dust and dirt waiting for rains to come and then germinate. In gardens where you are watering regularly the same weeds (they realise this) will grow to normal maturity before flowering and seeding. The old proverb applies ‘One year seeding is seven years weeding’.

There are major changes happening in the human world the beginnings of which are now seen, broken supply chains, manufacture closures and hyper inflation. Not good outlooks but you can prepare yourself to have the basics of life, Food, Water and Shelter.

More people are gardening and I am sure more will join us as the cost of food sources rise.

Which brings us back to the topic, Seeds.

The knowledge here is not new but was learned thousands of years ago and is even mentioned in the Bible. You grow a crop shall we say of lettuce, a quick and easy crop to grow all year round, fast to grow in summer with long daylight hours, but slow to grow in winter when we are down to about only 8 hours of sunlight a day. You plant ten lettuces, if you have chicken manure available you put a nice blob of it into the planting hole, put a little soil over it and in with your seedling. I have never seen lettuce grow so fast (in the summer time) with a half a cup of chicken manure in the root zone. Spray the crop every week or two with Magic Botanic Liquid (MBL) it will about double the size of the harvest.

Then you watch the crop’s progress as they head to maturity and you select one which you think is the best of the crop. You do not harvest that lettuce instead you let it stay on long after its fellows have been eaten so it goes to flower and then seeds. You will harvest more seeds than you are likely able to use in a life time if you harvest all.

When the seeds are dry you place them in a plastic bag with their type and date on the bag and you put that bag into a glass jar sealed with lid and into the fridge. You may have a dozen or more varieties of seeds in your jar, each named in their own plastic bags. Keep a few out to sow directly back into your garden or germinate to transplant. (Always best to direct sow)

Now you are going to do the same again; pick the best plant and let it go to seed, collect the seed and plant some for the third crop. Now that you have a new fresh supply of seeds you can give away to family and friends most of the seeds collected from the first crop. It pays to keep a small amount with the date. You are going to repeat the above and likely dependent on conditions where you are, you may have four or more crops a year.

Now an amazing thing happens; you will find that after a few crop cycles using the new seed from the latest crop that you have created a new strain of that plant which has adapted to your growing conditions and will be very superior to the initial plants.

If you are a miser and you only let the worst plant go to seed and you repeat that process crop after crop you will end up with some poor specimens. Vegetable crops that take longer to mature and seed will mean likely only two crops in a year and thus it will be much longer to get to your own superior strain.

Happy Gardening..

Phone 0800 466464
Garden Pages and News at http://www.gardenews.co.nz
Shar Pei pages at http://www.sharpei.co.nz
Mail Order products at http://www.0800466464.co.nz

Photo: pixabay.com

7 SURPRISING ways sugar can harm your health

(NaturalHealth365)  Let’s face it, sugar is extremely prevalent in today’s society.  Many of the prepared and processed foods in grocery stores contain an alarming amount of sugar.  This is why it’s well worth taking the extra minute or so to read the nutrition label before buying any packaged food item.

We already know the typical dangers of sugar consumption such as obesity, tooth decay, and low energy, but there are many other conditions out there that you may not be aware of.

Excessive sugar intake damages your health in MULTIPLE ways, studies show

Here are seven surprising ways that sugar harms your health.

READ MORE

https://www.naturalhealth365.com/sugar-intake-harms-health-3972.html

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Other news

Let artichokes be your “armor” – how this intriguing food protects against serious diseases

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Athletes Around the World are contracting Heart Problems

US Children’s Hospitals and Infants with Cardiac Issues

The Halloween event that turned into something else

ATTENTION diabetics: These 3 popular spices can help manage your blood sugar

(NaturalHealth365)  Did you know that there are organic spices for diabetics that can help manage your blood sugar better?  It is easy to add to any recipe and gives plenty of nutrients and specific health benefits.  Many studies suggest that merely half a teaspoon of cinnamon a day can significantly reduce excess blood sugar levels.

But before you run to the health food store to buy cinnamon, don’t forget to add fenugreek, coriander, and clove seeds.  These spices give you that extra kick of flavor while, at the same time, helping to stabilize your energy level.

READ MORE

https://www.naturalhealth365.com/spices-for-diabetics-3403.html

Photo: pixabay.com

New study shows ginger combats Alzheimer’s disease and cognitive impairment

(NaturalHealth365) Alzheimer’s disease, a neurodegenerative condition that impairs memory and cognitive abilities, currently affects over 6 million Americans – and causes the death of 83,000 people every year.  Unfortunately, rates of the disease are soaring, with the Alzheimer’s Association predicting that this number will climb to 13 million by the year 2050.

READ AT THE LINK

https://www.naturalhealth365.com/neuroprotective-effects-of-ginger-3436.html

3 simple ways to improve brain health

(NaturalHealth365)  Approximately 5.4 million Americans are currently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, and this number is expected to triple by 2050.  In addition, the rate of children with autism is said to be 1 in 50 throughout the United States.  What is happening to our collective brain health?

Think about the importance of our memories – which are a crucial part of our social lives.  Interacting, carrying a conversation, and participating in everyday tasks require a good functional memory.  This is why conditions such as autism and Alzheimer’s cause such concern for caregivers as they worry that their loved ones will forget to turn off a stove or other life-threatening mishaps.

READ MORE

https://www.naturalhealth365.com/brain-health-3974.html

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What Is Daikon (Radish) Good For? (Mercola)

An old Chinese proverb states, “Eating pungent radish and drinking hot tea lets the starved doctors beg on their knees.”1 There’s probably some truth to this saying, as radishes are among the most nutritionally loaded low-calorie vegetables you can enjoy today.2

Most radishes in the U.S. are known for their red skin and round shape, but have you ever tried the long and white Asian variety called daikon?3 Discover the various benefits and culinary uses of daikon, and why it’s worthwhile to add to your diet.

What Is Daikon?

You may know it as an Oriental radish, but daikon (Raphanus sativus var. longipinnatus)4 actually goes by many names, including mooli, Satsuma radish,5 Chinese radish and most notably, Japanese radish.6 In fact, daikon is Japanese for “big root.”7

Daikon is believed to have originated in the Mediterranean regions8 and eventually spread to Asian countries like Japan, China and Korea, where it is utilized in various dishes.9 It is easily distinguished from other radishes by its large, vibrant green leaves and a long white root, resembling a pale carrot. Daikon can grow up to 18 inches long, and weigh 1 to 4 pounds.10

Daikon’s flavor is considered milder and less peppery than other radishes. Served raw, it is subtle and tangy with a crisp and juicy texture. When cooked, it tastes similar to cooked turnips.11

Although the root is the most utilized part of daikon, it is technically a cruciferous vegetable.12 In Asian countries, the root is commonly pickled and eaten as a side dish, or grated, cubed, or thinly sliced for addition to main dishes. Nevertheless, the leaves should not be thrown away, as they offer their own plethora of health benefits.13

You can enjoy daikon sprouts (called “kaiware” by the Japanese), which have a pungent and peppery flavor that adds a kick to sandwiches and salads.14 They are best consumed raw or used as garnish.15

5 Daikon Health Benefits

You can’t go wrong with adding daikon to your favorite meals, as it offers a multitude of nutrients that can be advantageous to your health.

Daikon is known to help boost a weak digestive system.16 A 2017 study also learned that isothiocyanates, which give daikon its peppery and pungent qualities,17 were found to help reduce the risk of breast cancer.18

Daikon also contains considerable amounts of potassium, vitamin C and phosphorus19 — nutrients essential for good health.

While you may think that daikon’s benefits are only available through the root, you’ll be surprised to learn that its leaves have impressive nutritional value, too.20 They’re actually loaded with vitamin A, which is essential for eye health, and vitamin C, iron and calcium.21

Daikon may help optimize your well-being by:

  • Boosting digestive health — Daikon may help facilitate better digestion of proteins and fats,22 which in turn helps inhibit constipation.23 Its antioxidants were also found to help trigger bile flow,24 which is essential in breaking down and absorbing fats.25
  • Assisting in detoxification — As a diuretic, daikon may help stimulate urination, which is necessary for keeping the kidneys clean.26
  • Bolstering your immunity — Daikon’s antibacterial and antifungal properties may help reduce the risk of bone or joint infections, gastroenteritis, meningitis and pneumonia.27
  • Promoting bone and skin health — Its high calcium content28 may help alleviate osteoporosis.29 The liquid from boiled daikon leaves is also known to help reduce excess skin oils and odors.30
  • Helping with weight management — Daikon is a low-calorie and low-cholesterol vegetable, but it is high in fiber and many other nutrients1 — qualities that are ideal for people who want to maintain a healthy weight.32

Remember, if you want to reap all of daikon’s health benefits, it’s best to use the entire vegetable.

How to Cook Daikon: Tips to Keep in Mind

As with other radishes, the potential of culinary uses for daikon is endless. It can be cooked multiple ways, as a wonderful addition to your favorite soups, stews or meat dishes. You can roast, slow cook, boil, bake, steam or eat it raw, just as you would with a carrot.33 Daikon also works well as a substitute for recipes that call for other vegetables or other types of radishes, as it’s extremely versatile.34

As mentioned above, daikon leaves should not be thrown away, as they are just as nutritious and flexible as the root. However, they’re best when eaten fresh, ideally on the day they are purchased. Remember to rinse them before adding to your meals.35 If this is not possible, then you can preserve them: Place the leaves in a wire basket and blanch in boiling water, and then freeze.36

Here is a recipe from Cook for Good37 that uses both daikon leaves and root — nothing goes to waste!

RECIPE AT THE SOURCE:

https://foodfacts.mercola.com/daikon.html

Image by Hans Braxmeier from Pixabay

Protecting your fruit crops from Codlin & Guava Moth (Wally Richards)

I wrote this article a few months ago but as several gardeners recently have been asking how to protect their fruit crops from both Codlin Moth and Guava Moth

I think it is well worth repeating this information. Guava moth is mostly in the upper north island but there has been a few cases in other areas likely as a result of fruit been brought south from infected areas.

So share with family and friends as there is nothing worse than losing your crop to these two pests.

There are two moths in New Zealand that attack fruit namely, Codlin Moth which have apples, pears and walnuts as their host fruit. Guava Moth which has all fruit and nuts as their host.

The Codlin Moth is seasonal active while there is fruit on their host plants but the Guava Moth is all year around going from one host tree to another.

Both are relatively easy to control so that you can obtain a reasonable amount of your crop as long as you follow my proven advise. Firstly let us understand how these two pests operate.

Being moths they only fly at night and they find their host tree by the smell of the forming and ripening fruit. So if they cannot smell your tree/fruit they will fly on by to a tree they can smell.

This is the first step in reducing the damage to your fruit by disguising the smell of the tree/fruit.

To do this you need an overriding smell that negates the smell of the tree.

Wallys Neem Tree Powder scattered on the ground underneath the tree from the trunk to the drip line.

Then by making some little bags out of curtain netting we hang more of Wallys Neem Tree Powder in the tree on the lower branches about head high at the four cardinal points.

So we use the Wallys Neem Tree Powder as described after flowering and when the fruit has formed to a reasonable size.

One application then is all that is needed for each crop to disguise the fruit as the powder last over 2 months slowly breaking down..

The next step in control is to prevent any grubs that hatch out near your fruit from eating their way into the fruit.

Once a grub enters the fruit you have lost the battle cause even if you use a poisonous systemic insecticide to kill it? Whats the point its going to die inside the fruit and be useless.

No you need a non toxic substance on the outside of the fruit that is going to prevent the grub from eating its way in.

Wallys Super Neem Tree oil with Raingard is the perfect answer.

You spray the fruit, not the tree so there is a coating of Wallys Neem Tree Oil on the skin of the fruit

protected from washing off in rain with Wallys Raingard (lasts for 14 days before reapplying.)

The Neem Oil is an anti-feedent which means when the young grub takes its first bite it will get some Neem Oil in its gut and will never eat again starving to death fairly quickly been so young.

On your mature fruit you will have a little pin pricked scar that where it took its one and only bite.

So all you do is just spray the maturing fruit every 14 days that are relatively easy to reach and spray.

Fruit that are more difficult to spray will likely be eaten by birds later on anyway and as long as you are getting a nice amount of fruit to harvest that is all that really matters.

Then there is also another way to control moth problem by which you set up a moth lure to attract them and kill them.

Take one litre of hot water add a100 grams of sugar, one teaspoon of marmite, half a tablespoon of Cloudy Ammonia and half a tablespoon of Vanilla:

Mix well and divide the mix between two plastic milk or soft drink bottles.

Punch some holes in the side of the bottles just above the level of the mix.

Place on a stand about a couple of metres away from the tree.

At about waist height like on a small folding table.

When a number of moths are caught dispose of them and make up a new solution.

Cloudy Ammonia used to be common once upon a time from a grocery store if not so easy to find try hardware stores, there are two chains in NZ and they may have.

If you do all three procedures for control or at least the first two then you should be able to once again en joy your own fruit.

The Codlin Moth traps are useful as if you monitor them they trap the male codlin moths which tells you it is the time to start using the Wally Super Neem Tree Oil spray on your apples etc.

If after a month you find no new male moths in the trap you can stop spraying as it is all over for the season. (That is unless you have Guava moths in your region).

Guava moth pheromone traps are a waste of time because they are all year round so there is no time to start or stop control sprays as with the Codlin Moth………..

Curly Leaf and Garlic Rust are also two concerns of many readers.

If you have either of these conditions currently my suggestion is to take a tablespoon of molasses dissolve in a litre of hot water and place in a trigger sprayer with 20 mils of Magic Botanic Liquid MBL (per litre) and spray the foliage of either plants. Repeat weekly.

The molasses can help save your crop by supplying energy that the leaves cannot create from sunlight because of the damage they suffer from the two diseases.

Phone 0800 466464
Garden Pages and News at www.gardenews.co.nz
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Grow Your Own Food with Tips from A School Garden Teacher

The coronavirus pandemic has inspired a lot of people to explore self-sufficiency in the form of scratch cooking and growing their own food. But for many first time gardeners, growing your own food is an intimidating task that brings up lots of questions: what to grow, where to grow it and, well, how not to screw it up? Is it as simple as throwing some seeds in some dirt, watering them and giving them sun? We asked an elementary school garden teacher for her tips: we figured, if she can teach young kids to grow their own food, she can teach you, too.

Sanaya Irani is a FoodCorps service member with Detroit Public Schools. She teaches kindergarteners through 6th graders how to turn nothing into something — how to feed themselves. She has found that “the detail-oriented aspects of gardening are especially challenging for students,” which is probably true for a lot of first time gardening adults as well. Here we dig into some of those details.

READ MORE

https://foodprint.org/blog/grow-your-own-food/

Image from Pixabay

How to Grow Your Own Food

Growing your own is not only for survivalists, it’s for anyone that wants to save some money at the grocery store! There are also other benefits to growing your own food such as knowing what going into the soil, you get more food for your money, and you can feel good about yourself because you helped something grow. Even if you don’t know the first thing about growing your own food, we have a basic list below to help you get started.

Decide what to grow

The first step in this process is to decide what you want to grow. You may love to get lettuce from the grocery, but it may be worth considering trying to grow your own instead.

READ MORE

https://survivallife.com/how-to-grow-your-own-food/

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16 Health Problems That Improved in Patients Who Switched From GMO to Organic Diets

By Jeffrey M. Smith

A new study reveals the harsh reality of a diet filled with genetically modified foods.

Peer-reviewed article released Tuesday in the International Journal of Human Nutrition and Functional Medicine and conducted by the Institute for Responsible Technology revealed that the health of all of the participants improved after switching to a non-GMO diet or simply reducing the amount of GMO foods they ate.

The results, from over 3,250 people, mostly in the United States, closely matched reports by physicians around the nation who have seen similar results when their patients change to largely non-GMO and organic diets.

READ MORE

http://rushfm.co.nz/alternative-medicine/16-health-problems-that-improved-in-patients-who-switched-from-gmo-to-organic-diets-copy/

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Things to do in the garden right now (Wally Richards)

GARDENING TASKS

Now that we are halfway through Spring and quickly heading towards the first month of Summer (December) there is a fair bit to do in our gardens so lets run a check list in case some things are missed. It will depend on what you have in your gardens as to whether any or all things concern you.

Roses: generally at this time we have new foliage, buds and some flowering taking place. If there is any sign of black spot or rust, spray the roses and soil underneath with a solution of potassium permanganate mixed at ¼ a teaspoon to a litre of non chlorinated water and spray. (It may stain walls etc temporarily). Repeat weekly till new foliage is clean.

Food for Roses ; ideal is horse manure, blood & bone otherwise sheep manure pellets with the blood & bone. These should be covered with some purchased compost. Add to this a sprinkling of Fruit & Flower Power once a month. If you want good roses avoid soil damaging fertilisers such as rose fertiliser and nitrophoska. Bio Boost is also a good natural slow release one and very well priced.

If you have roses that need recovery from past chemical sprays such as Shield (now banned) the chemicals will have broken down the natural immunity of your roses. You may like to start a recovery spray program which I wrote about originally just on 10 years ago.

On the first of the month mix the following at their label rates per a litre of water, PerKfection Supa for Roses, Magic Botanic Liquid, Mycorrcin & Wallys Neem Tree Oil. Spray late in the day just before sunset. Then on the 15th of the month repeat spray all the above except for PerKfection Supa. Only water with non chlorinated water so you don’t harm the beneficial soil life including the gardeners best friend, earthworms.

In some cases the health improvement of your roses will be quickly noticed; although some may have the additional problem of inherently poor breeding and always be a sickly specimen (even if they have brilliant flowers).

Lawns; I have had a number of inquiries about lawn problems starting with moss in lawns. Dont waste your money on sulphate of iron as it only burns the top of the moss which then it quickly comes back. Instead, jet spray the moss with Wallys Moss & Liverwort Control. It kills the moss completely without damaging the grasses. If there is a spongy feeling when walking on the lawn that indicates a thatch problem. Simply spray the lawn with Thatch Busta to clean up the thatch. (Do the moss killing first, wait about 2 weeks then the Thatch Busta.)

Bare patches in the lawn indicate the root damage caused by grass grubs in the autumn/winter period and these same grubs are now down deep, pupating to emerge shortly as beetles. They are too deep to do anything about them at this time so don’t waste your money on treating. The horse has gone so no need to close the gate.

Another bare patch problem with holes in the lawn indicate that porina caterpillars are at work eating at the base of the grass in the evening (while they are safe from birds) to return to their tunnels before dawn. A simple spray over the lawn with Wallys Neem Tree Oil will stop the damage and cause them to starve to death. In areas where porina are a problem treat the lawn this way every 3 months.

When the grass grub beetles emerge they are going to eat the foliage of several plants so after you have noticed holes in the leaves go out after dark with a torch and have a look. If you have beetles then spray then with a mix of Wallys Super Pyrethrum and Wallys Neem Tree Oil. Repeat nightly.

Also a bright light in a window facing the lawn with a trough two thirds full of water with a film of kerosene floating on the top; placed directly under the window pane, will trap lots of beetles (maybe a few Codlin Moths too) They fly at the bright light hit the pane and fall into the water where the kerosene stops them from escaping.

Feed the beetles to the chickens next morning or flush down the toilet.

Weeds; they certainly grow at this time of the year and as long as you deal to them before they set seed they are not too much of a problem.

In fact weeds are a excellent asset to your garden soils as they have taken up goodness which can be returned to great advantage. You could pull the weeds out, shake the soil off them and lay them back down on the soil. That is good but even better; with a sharp knife slice through the weeds just below soil surface. This leaves the roots in the soil to rot and provide food for the soil life and it does not disrupt the beneficial fungi in the soil. The foliage can be laid on the soil surface where it will be quickly devoured by the soil life and worms. Your soil will build up humus quickly if you spray the dying weeds with Mycorrcin.

Doing these things (sure it takes a bit of time but it is so therapeutic and anti-stressful) will over time make for dream gardens and plants.

Citrus; its a good time to sprinkle Wallys Neem tree Powder underneath the citrus trees from the trunk to the drip line. This will help prevent insect damage. If you have chook manure give a good sprinkling of that otherwise any animal manure or sheep manure pellets along with blood & bone. Cover with compost. Sprinkle Fruit and Flower Power once a month. A spray of Wallys Liquid Copper with Raingard added in the spring and autumn will help with any citrus diseases. If the trees are looking a bit sad add Perkfection Supa to the copper spray.

In cases where wet feet have rotted roots treat the area with Terracin to suppress the pathogens and help save the tree. Three weeks later drench the soil with Mycorrcin.

Note always use non-chlorinated water which is easily achieved with a special carbon bonded filter on your outside tap. (Cost $140)

Pear Slugs; In warmer areas and later in cooler areas the pear slugs will attack pear and plum trees, they eat small holes in the foliage and look like a black slug. Simply spray the tree with Wallys Liquid Copper to control. Remember be nice to your gardens by being natural.

For something different

I wonder why over 50 NZ Doctors and medical professionals would put their careers and incomes in jeopardy by making a stand?

You may not have heard of this group they call themselves NZ Doctors  Speaking  out With Science and they have some interesting things to say.

https://nzdsos.com/2021/10/08/the-rise-of-totalitarianism/?fbclid=IwAR1xBsoLwdGK5PGR86jXeovLleI3Tef3F5SO23riJyvahjW1aZ3hLCyEZu0

Phone 0800 466464
Garden Pages and News at www.gardenews.co.nz
Shar Pei pages at  www.sharpei.co.nz
Mail Order products at www.0800466464.co.nz

New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990. Part II of the Act covers a broad range of Civil and Political Rights. As part of the right to life and the security of the person, the Act guarantees everyone:

1The right not to be deprived of life except in accordance with fundamental justice (Section 8)

2The right not to be subjected to torture or to cruel, degrading, or disproportionately severe treatment or punishment (Section 9)

3The right not to be subjected to medical or scientific experimentation without consent (Section 10)

4The right to refuse to undergo any medical treatment (Section 11)

 Furthermore, the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 guarantees everyone: Freedom of Thought, Conscience, and Religion.
This includes the right to freedom of thought, conscience, religion, and belief,
INCLUDING THE RIGHT TO ADOPT AND HOLD OPINIONS WITHOUT INTERFERENCE (Section 1)

Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.

QUESTION MORE

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Regards Wally Richards

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4 UNEXPECTED benefits of eating carrots

(NaturalHealth365)  Carrots have a well-deserved reputation as a healthy food that can benefit eyesight.  These sweet, crunchy root vegetables are extraordinarily high in beta-carotene, the plant pigment responsible for their brilliant orange color.  The body converts beta-carotene to vitamin A, which is essential for vision.  And lutein – another plant pigment in carrots – actually reduces the risk of age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in older Americans.

While carrots’ most obvious health benefits center on protecting and enhancing vision, they do confer additional gifts – some of which may surprise you!

READ MORE

https://www.naturalhealth365.com/benefits-of-carrots-3964.html

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5 Ways to QUICKLY become More Self Sufficient

WATCH AT THE LINK:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pd0AklR4Mu

Self Sufficient Me 1.39M subscribers In this video, I give you 5 ways to QUICKLY become more self-sufficient! Support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/selfsufficientme (the top tier $25 AU enables mentoring from yours truly via an exclusive VIP email where I will answer your questions etc ASAP). Using the links below also helps support my channel: Help support the Channel and buy a T-shirt/Merchandise from our Spreadshirt shop: https://goo.gl/ygrXwU or Teespring (below the video). Go here to get Birdies Raised Garden bed in the USA: https://shop.epicgardening.com/ and use SSME2020 for a 5% discount. Check out http://www.gardentoolsnow.com/ for tools I recommend to use. Shop on Amazon for plants or garden equip: https://bit.ly/2yRFNGQ Shop for plants or garden equip on eBay Australia: https://bit.ly/2BPCykb Blog: http://www.selfsufficientme.com/ (use the search bar on my website to find info on certain subjects or gardening ideas) Forum: http://www.selfsufficientculture.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SelfSufficie… Twitter: https://twitter.com/SufficientMe Subscribe to my channel: http://goo.gl/cpbojR Self Sufficient Me is based on our small 3-acre property/homestead in SE Queensland Australia about 45kms north of Brisbane – the climate is subtropical (similar to Florida). I started Self Sufficient Me in 2011 as a blog website project where I document and write about backyard food growing, self-sufficiency, and urban farming in general. I love sharing my foodie and DIY adventures online so come along with me and let’s get into it! Cheers, Mark 🙂

Getting rid of depression and anxiety: How to eat for better mental health

(NaturalHealth365)  The foods that you eat not only impact your waistline and your physical health, but they also affect the way you think and feel.  You’ve probably always heard that you are what you eat – and it’s true, what you put in your body matters.

But, according to a review published in the March 2021 issue of Frontiers of Nutrition, it’s what you feed your brain that really counts.

Your “second brain” is smarter than you think

Your gastrointestinal system plays an integral role in not only your physical health but in your mood and mental health as well.  This is because scientists have found that neural tissue doesn’t only exist in our brains.  It lines our gut as well.

READ AT THE LINK

https://www.naturalhealth365.com/banish-depression-anxiety-3400.html

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17 Simple Tips for Living More Sustainably in a City Apartment

WATCH AT THE LINK:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M0rDahrsHBQ

Rob Greenfield 366K subscribers Want to see what my life was like 3 years ago when I still lived in a “normal apartment?” I think many of you may find this more relatable and achievable than living in a tiny house or with just 111 possessions so I’m really excited to share this with you! This video was filmed May 2014 and the filmmaker never followed through to produce anything. It’s 3 years later and I finally had someone put the footage together. I hope it provides you some inspiration for simple and sustainable living in home in your apartment or house! For more tips on sustainable living at home check out these resources: My House Guide to Sustainable, Simple, and Healthy Living: https://www.RobGreenfield.org/Sustain… My Sustainable Living Series from my bike ride across the USA: https://www.RobGreenfield.org/Sustain… Thank you to F1LM (www.F1LM.org) for editing this video! — Rob Greenfield is an activist and humanitarian dedicated to leading the way to a more sustainable and just world. He embarks on extreme projects to bring attention to important global issues and inspire positive change. 100% of his media income is donated to grassroots nonprofits. His YouTube channel is a source to educate, inspire and help others to live more sustainable, equal and just lives. Videos frequently cover sustainable living, simple living, growing your own food, gardening, self-sufficiency, minimalism, off the grid living, zero waste, living in a tiny house and permaculture. Find Rob Greenfield on: Website: https://www.RobGreenfield.org Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/RobJGreenfield @RobJGreenfield Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RobGreenfield YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/RobGreenfield Twitter: https://twitter.com/RobJGreenfield @RobJGreenfield — Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/5lvl/

NEW STUDY: Reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke by making THIS common-sense diet change

(NaturalHealth365)  Heart disease is responsible for 655,000 deaths a year, making it the leading cause of mortality in the United States.  (And, close to 50 percent of all American adults suffer from some form of heart disease.)  But, that’s not the only disturbing statistic.  With a shocking 40 percent of the adults in the United States classified as medically obese, and almost half of all American adults affected by diabetes or prediabetes, the overall picture is a population plagued by ill health and chronic disease.

And, while many factors contribute to this grim reality, experts agree on a primary culprit – the excessive consumption of processed, sugary foods and drinks.  Now, new research published in Circulation, the journal of the American Heart Association, reveals just how many lives could be saved by reducing added sugars in packaged foods and beverages.  (Fasten your seat belt – this figure may astonish you).

READ AT THE LINK

https://www.naturalhealth365.com/added-sugars-3999.html

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GOOD HEALTH – info on virus protection: free download (Medical Medium)

DOWNLOAD FREE AT THE LINK BELOW:

https://www.medicalmedium.com/free-reports/virus-protection

FURTHER INFO:

“Virus Protection
We are up against all kinds of viruses on this planet. No matter what virus you want protection from, or which virus might be the hot topic in the media at any given time, all of the Medical Medium healing information can help protect you and your loved ones.”

Read more at the website link above.