Tag Archives: flawed

RESEARCH: An Ecologist & a Biological Sciences Professor propose an alternative to Predator Free 2050: “based on 3 flawed assumptions … it is badly designed & unachievable” they say

A research collaboration is proposing an alternative to Predator Free 2050, calling the current policy “badly designed and unachievable”.

16 July 2018

The research says the Predator Free 2050 policy is based on three flawed assumptions — that predator extermination is the best way to protect biodiversity, that we need to eradicate every stoat, rat and possum to protect biodiversity, and that complete eradication of predators is possible. This research collaboration was undertaken by Associate Professor Wayne Linklater from Victoria University of Wellington’s School of Biological Sciences and ecologist Dr Jamie Steer, who is also a Senior Biodiversity Advisor at the Greater Wellington Regional Council.

“None of these assumptions are true,” says Associate Professor Linklater. “Complete eradication of predators is technologically impossible, and biodiversity is affected more in some places by habitat decline and plant eaters than it is by predators.”

But perhaps one of the biggest issues with Predator Free 2050 is it requires eliminating select predators from complex communities of other plants, animals and humans, he says.

“This will likely lead to negative social and ecological outcomes. Eradicating some predators will cause populations of other introduced animals to erupt. Many people also have valid concerns about the safety and cruelty of predator control methods, and the policy fails to take into account Māori views on predator management as well, particularly on Māori lands.”

Predator Free 2050 could also lead to reduced public and government support for future conservation policies, says Associate Professor Linklater.

READ MORE AT THE SOURCE:

 

https://www.victoria.ac.nz/news/2018/07/researchers-propose-alternative-to-unachievable-predator-free-2050

PHOTO credit: Image by TeroVesalainen from Pixabay

 

NZ’s Predator Free 2050 goal, “based on 3 flawed assumptions … is badly designed & unachievable” say both an Ecologist & a Biological Sciences Professor

A research collaboration is proposing an alternative to Predator Free 2050, calling the current policy “badly designed and unachievable”.

16 July 2018

The research says the Predator Free 2050 policy is based on three flawed assumptions — that predator extermination is the best way to protect biodiversity, that we need to eradicate every stoat, rat and possum to protect biodiversity, and that complete eradication of predators is possible. This research collaboration was undertaken by Associate Professor Wayne Linklater from Victoria University of Wellington’s School of Biological Sciences and ecologist Dr Jamie Steer, who is also a Senior Biodiversity Advisor at the Greater Wellington Regional Council.

“None of these assumptions are true,” says Associate Professor Linklater. “Complete eradication of predators is technologically impossible, and biodiversity is affected more in some places by habitat decline and plant eaters than it is by predators.”

But perhaps one of the biggest issues with Predator Free 2050 is it requires eliminating select predators from complex communities of other plants, animals and humans, he says.

“This will likely lead to negative social and ecological outcomes. Eradicating some predators will cause populations of other introduced animals to erupt. Many people also have valid concerns about the safety and cruelty of predator control methods, and the policy fails to take into account Māori views on predator management as well, particularly on Māori lands.”

Predator Free 2050 could also lead to reduced public and government support for future conservation policies, says Associate Professor Linklater.

READ MORE AT THE SOURCE:

 

https://www.victoria.ac.nz/news/2018/07/researchers-propose-alternative-to-unachievable-predator-free-2050

PHOTO credit: Image by TeroVesalainen from Pixabay

 

“NZ’s Predator Free 2050 program .. not .. well informed by scientific knowledge or conservation best practice” say two conservation academics

NZ’s very controversial Predator Free 2050 program is driven by “international agreements and a global agenda to purge all non native species of animals and plants around the world”.

A paper published by Professor Wayne Linklater and Dr Jamie Steer (July 2018) in Conservation Letters: A Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology  (cited at the Wiley Online Library*) concludes that the Government’s Predator Free 2050 program “has not been well informed by scientific knowledge or conservation best practice. It also misdirects attention” they say “from more fundamental and direct threats to biodiversity protection and recovery”.

Associate Professor Wayne Linklater from Victoria University’s School of Biological Sciences, considered by many to be the “founder of modern pest management in New Zealand” was recently awarded the 2018 Peter Nelson Memorial Trophy by New Zealand’s Biosecurity Institute in recognition of his research in pest management.

Dr Jamie Steer is a  Senior Biodiversity Advisor for Greater Wellington Regional Council. He has a Doctor of Philosophy in Environmental Science from the University of Auckland, a Master of Science in Ecology and Biodiversity, and a Bachelor of Science in Biology. He is a former member of the Ecological Society of New Zealand and a current Associate of the New Zealand Centre for Human-Animal Studies.

I’m sure you will agree that these two academics are well qualified to be commenting on NZ’s Predator Free agenda. DoC have purportedly discussed with them the concerns outlined in their research paper, however DoC is undeterred. Bear in mind they are tasked with selling to the public a global agenda signed up to historically to rid every nation in the world of any and all non native species, plant and animal.

You can read the research paper at the link:

Predator Free 2050: A flawed conservation policy displaces higher priorities and better, evidence‐based alternatives

Abstract

New Zealand’s policy to exterminate five introduced predators by 2050 is well‐meant but warrants critique and comparison against alternatives. The goal is unachievable with current or near‐future technologies and resources. Its effects on ecosystems and 26 other mammalian predators and herbivores will be complex. Some negative outcomes are likely. Predators are not always and everywhere the largest impact on biodiversity. Lower intensity predator suppression, habitat protection and restoration, and prey refugia will sometimes better support threatened biodiversity.

READ THE ENTIRE PAPER AT THE SOURCE:

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/conl.12593


 

*”Conservation Letters is a scientific journal publishing empirical and theoretical research with significant implications for the conservation of biological diversity. The journal welcomes submissions across the biological and social sciences – especially interdisciplinary submissions – that advance pragmatic conservation goals as well as scientific understanding”.  SOURCE