Tag Archives: ecology

Petition: Save Golden Bay’s Te Waikoropupū Springs from a proposal to take more water for dairy farming – please consider signing

Save Te Waikoropupū : Tasman District Councillors

Campaign created by
Save Our Springs

We call on the Tasman District Councillors to ban taking any more water from Te Waikoropupū springs for industrial dairying.

Why is this important?

Te Waikoropupū (Pupū) springs in Golden bay has some of the clearest waters ever measured on earth.

And right now they are under threat from an extreme proposal to take water from the rivers that feed the springs and use it to water grass for more dairy cows. More cows would mean more pollution in these pristine springs.

If accepted the proposal would allow the springs to lose at least 20% of their world renowned clarity. It would also allow the level of nitrate pollution go above what National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) has recommended is the safe upper limit. (1)(2)

The springs are of immense cultural, ecological and spiritual importance to New
Zealanders and are also visited by tens of thousands of tourists every year. They are Wahi Tapu (sacred place) for local iwi.

But in the coming months, Tasman District Councillors could accept this drastic proposal from a group called FLAG – the Takaka Freshwater Land and Advisory Group. This would be a disaster for the springs, for New Zealanders and for the local economy that depends on tourism.

Our international reputation and one of our cherished places of unique natural beauty destroyed forever.

These councillors have a choice to make. They can either protect the springs, or they can choose more dairy cows.

We the undersigned call on them to protect and safeguard this national and international treasure for current and future generations.

(1)http://www.tasman.govt.nz/document/serve/Summary%20of%20Takaka%20FLAG%20process%20and%20interim%20decisions%20-16%20Dec%202016%20v41.pdf?path=/EDMS/Public/Other/Environment/Water/WaterManagement/000000709026.
(2)http://www.tasman.govt.nz/document/serve/RM130269_HearingDocument6_FriendsGB1.pdf?path=/EDMS/Public/Other/Property/ResourceConsents/NotifiedResourceConsentApplications/Gunsboro/RM130269_Gunsboro_HearingDocuments/000000442707.

How it will be delivered

In person to the council 5th April

SIGN PETITION AT THIS LINK:
https://www.toko.org.nz/petitions/save-te-waikoropupu-springs-tasman-district-council

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Politicians join with conservation groups in calling on the EPA to ban bee-killing pesticides until a full scientific review is conducted

(Natural News) State politicians and conservation groups urged the United States Environmental Protection Agency(EPA) to hold off approval of bee-killing neonics in order to conduct a full scientific review of the pesticides involved, reported an EcoWatch article.

Congressmen Earl Blumenauer and Jim McGovern recently reintroduced the Saving America’s Pollinators Act, a bill that blocks new neonicotinoid insecticides while the EPA is investigating the full extent of their effects on bees, humans, other animals, and the environment.

Various conservation groups and environmental organizations have also presented a huge collection of public comments to the EPA. More than 100,000 individuals are pressing the agency to reduce the widespread use of neonicotinoid pesticides.

Neonics have been cited by numerous studies as a major driving factor in the decline of pollinator populations. The insecticides also threaten birds and aquatic invertebrates, according to research by EPA-employed scientists. (Related: EPA, Monsanto face lawsuit over pesticide drift that damaged millions of acres and threatened endangered species.)

Numerous studies say neonics are deadly

The EPA is currently investigating the preliminary ecological and human health risks posed by the neonicotinoids clothianidin, thiamethoxam, and dinotefuran. It is also performing a preliminary ecological risk assessment for the widely-used imidacloprid.

According to the agency’s initial risk assessments, neonics turned out to be lethal to birds that consumed grass, seeds, and dead insects contaminated by the insecticides.

“EPA’s recent assessment confirms what the science has already shown,” remarked Nichelle Harriott of the environmental group Beyond Pesticides. “[That] neonicotinoids are highly toxic not just to bees, but to aquatic species and birds [also]. She stressed the importance of the EPA taking actions against those chemicals to protect U.S. waterways and pollinators.

“Our nation’s beekeepers continue to suffer unacceptable mortality of 40 percent annually and higher,” said Andrew Kimbrell of the Center for Food Safety.

According to him, neonicotinoid contamination of numerous water sources endanger both wild pollinators and wetland birds. Kimbrell urged the EPA to accept the findings of numerous scientific literature and take appropriate actions to reduce the negative effects of these insecticides.

Research efforts showed that even small amounts of neonics can deprive migrating songbirds of their sense of direction when they need it most. And a United States Geological Survey study determined that the pesticide level in the Great Lakes are endangering important aquatic insects.

“By harming pollinators like bees and butterflies, and natural pest control agents like birds and beneficial insects, neonicotinoids are sabotaging the very organisms on which farmers depend,” said Cynthia Palmer of the American Bird Conservancy.

Neonics have already contaminated U.S. food supplies. A joint study by the American Bird Conservancy and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health discovered neonicotinoids in food samples taken from dining halls in the U.S. Capitol building.

As many as five different neonics were found in meals that congressmen, senators, and their staff eat every day.

EPA dragging feet on neonics crisis

Neonicotinoids are banned in Europe, while the Pest Management Regulatory Agency of Canada urges a similar ban on imidacloprid, the most widely-used neonic formula.

“The only thing that is keeping the U.S. from joining other nations in banning the use of these devastating poisons is the immense profit that fuels PR campaigns, intense lobbying efforts, and questionable studies designed to mislead us on the harm these poisons do,” accused Dr. Luke Goembel of the Central Maryland Beekeepers Association.

READ MORE

https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-03-04-conservation-groups-epa-ban-bee-killing-pesticides-scientific-review.html

Wellington stream a brown, bubbly industrial dump that is killing the eels

More sustainable development from our LG folks. I challenge you to examine LG websites (Councils, Regional Council, Horizons) – they’re replete with a ton of rhetoric about sustainable this and sustainable that … all of which they pay mere lip service to. Note the comment from them in the article when whose responsibility it is is being followed up:

“T&T Landfills manager Sophie Gray said all information was available on the council’s website. When asked when the drainage problems would be fixed, she said it was a matter between “me and the council” before hanging up.”

In my opinion placed there to lull you into thinking all this toxic pollution is not their fault.  One gets the impression these DCs are fully in bed with the respective industries. Examine also though some of the events that transpire in the various other regions where the life in the waterways is dying off. Recently we had a huge die off of pipi and tuatua at Waitarere Beach. We hear a flurry in the news of ‘yes we are testing’ etc etc etc, and unless you pester them you’ll likely hear no more of it. Or when you do it is some curious thing to blame like I read recently, ‘pine pesticide’. Then they blame floods or high temps. All ‘natural’ phenomena of course so industrial pollution can’t be blamed. But here in this video, the stream is said to stink of chemicals, to which the likely reply will be the usual mantra of ‘it can’t be proven’. Not without extensive and expensive testing at least. Which predictably nobody will feel responsible enough to stump up with the costs for. Industries/corporations manage to let themselves off the hook in terms of responsibility for clean up. They have succeeded in reframing all of that by calling the damages externalities and making the public pay. Really the must watch as I always recommend is, ‘The Corporation’ doco. The profits of corporations are generally so large they pay for any fines out of their lunch money. If they get any fines that is. Largely they create carnage then move on leaving the locals to suck it up … get poisoned … whatever. They are rarely made to pay. So here we have dying eels as the canary in the coal mine. How long will it be before there is nothing left? We can’t swim in these streams and rivers any more, many more we can’t even wade in they’re so toxic. So why would we be expecting eels to survive in them? The regional authorities need to step up & enforce their consents properly instead of turning the proverbial blind eye.

EnvirowatchRangitikei

Forget clean and green – this Wellington stream is brown, bubbly and litter-strewn

As Jane Poata walks beside Wellington’s Owhiro Stream, the toxic stench rekindles childhood memories of holidaying beside New Zealand’s most-contaminated site.

It is a metallic smell she described as ammonia and lime, rising from the brown and bubbly stream, a tributary of which passes through T&T Landfills before running behind a primary school and homes then into Taputeranga Marine Reserve off the capital’s south coast.

Greater Wellington Regional Council has confirmed the contamination came from the T&T Landfills, which was in the process of diverting the tributary to Owhiro Stream and creating a filtering wetland so it no longer picked up debris and contaminants when flood water rushed through.

READ MORE:
* Criticism at lack of action over rising contamination in Wellington’s Owhiro Stream
* Wellington stream brown, swollen and frothy
* The new ‘swimmable’ fresh water target: Nick Smith defends his plan
*Editorial: We must clean up our waterways to prove we are clean and green

“Any contaminant can be toxic and harmful to the stream ecology and people coming into contact, but it depends on the levels we find.”

The landfill was fined following a similar incident in November. Cross said further fines had not been ruled out but the council was more focused now on fixing the problem.

T&T Landfills manager Sophie Gray said all information was available on the council’s website. When asked when the drainage problems would be fixed, she said it was a matter between “me and the council” before hanging up.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/91441533/Forget-clean-and-green-this-Wellington-stream-is-brown-bubbly-and-litter-strewn?cid=app-iPad