Tag Archives: Decision

The push for child euthanasia without parental permission!

From caldronpool.com

…ultimately the wishes of capable patients with respect to confidentiality must be respected,’ the essay stated.

Bioethicists have started preparing the way for the legalisation of child euthanasia in Canada, with one of the proposals advocating assisted suicide without parental approval.

Euthanasia in Canada is currently only available to capable patients aged 18 years or older, however the medical essay titled, Medically Assisted Dying in a Paediatric Hospital, published in the Oxford-based Journal of Medical Ethics, was written “with an eye to the near future when capable young people may gain access to Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID).”

In all other regards [than who initiates the euthanasia discussion], our working group has, at present, elected to conceptualise MAID as practically and ethically equivalent to other medical practices that result in the end of life. This theorisation of MAID is justified on the grounds that these practices share a common purpose of alleviating unendurable suffering and facilitate the patient dying on their own terms…and is reflective of our concern that the conceptualisation of MAID should not place additional burdens on the patient or function to limit the rights and freedoms to which patients are typically entitled.

The proposal goes on to state, if a child is mature enough to make decisions, doctors will not be required to inform parents or family members about the child’s decision to commit suicide.

If, however, a capable [child] patient explicitly indicates that they do not want their family members involved in their decision-making, although healthcare providers may encourage the patient to reconsider and involve their family, ultimately the wishes of capable patients with respect to confidentiality must be respected. If we regard MAID as practically and ethically equivalent to other medical decisions that result in the end of life, then confidentiality regarding MAID should be managed in this same way.

Can you imagine a child discussing euthanasia with a trigger-happy doctor but deciding not to include her parents because she knows they’d oppose it? Can you imagine her parents turning up to the hospital to see their daughter, only to find an empty bed?

The essay goes on to suggest protections for medical staff willing to provide assisted suicide for children. “We will not make public the names of the healthcare providers at The Hospital for Sick Children who have volunteered to provide MAID, nor will we disclose a full list of persons who comprised our working group.”

We will, however, as an institution, publicly discuss the provision of MAID in an effort to normalise this procedure and reduce social stigma for everyone involved. It is right and appropriate for this duty to fall to a well-resourced institution rather than rest on the shoulders of individual patients and providers.

When it comes to euthanasia, the slope is slippery indeed. Assisted suicide is always sold with temporary restrictions.

Also see: Netherlands, euthanasia and the very slippery slope.

If euthanasia is no longer restricted to adults, we have good reason to think someday it will no longer be restricted to the terminally ill. Rather, it will be extended to people with varying quality of life circumstances. How do we know this? Because it’s already happening in the Netherlands.

SOURCE

https://caldronpool.com/push-for-child-euthanasia-without-parental-permission/?fbclid=IwAR1w7asroOShRTDYVH_lQLsonQrbfvUsF-V85oxVFUrCIdJrW01-6je9Bmk

Landfill verdict expected by early April

11 March 2014      Here is the latest from the Chronicle (Wanganui) regarding an outcome and the submissions hearing regarding Midwest Disposals’ landfill at Bonny Glen near Marton.

In the hearings I attended the independent commissioner chairing the proceedings, said, ‘When the consent …. if the consent is granted ….’  He quickly corrected himself by adding, ‘ Of course there are no guarantees…’ or words to that effect. My life experience tells me that this is as near to a Freudian slip a person can get. Basically he is saying what is really in his head. I’ve written to three editorial columns now about this fact and none have printed my emails. Well two haven’t, we’ll see on the third as I only sent it this morning’.  (An hour ago, still not approved).

This is a sign of the times I believe. Big business is in bed with government in terms of money & profits, and any rhetoric about protecting our environment, are probably mere window dressing. I’ve been reading increasingly that there has to be a compromise between maintaining the economy & considering the environmental effects of industry. Very convenient with a loose directive like this. Who is really policing it? Certainly with the Marton evidence to date, the RDC & Horizons appear to have been in collusion. If they’re not, then why have Horizons not meted out some kind of penalty for the RDC’s negligence resulting in pollution of our waterways? For NINE years? (See previous articles here on the Tutaenui Stream’s pollution by leachate by going to ‘categories on left side of site page).

So no, I’ll not be a bit surprized ‘when’ the consents are granted. The hearing will allow the company in question here to concede to provide some of the needed mitigation of damage … and the locals will be left to complain accordingly should the fallout they suspect will continue to happen … continue to happen. And should you have problems getting through to Council, just go to the Community Committee Meeting, and Council may accept their recommendation … or they may not … as Mr Hamish Allen discovered when he tried to raise the leachate issue in the first place.

Here is the Chronicle article anyway… and watch this space as I will be writing further about the ‘independent’ commissions & who comprises the panels.

Read the ARTICLE HERE