Tag Archives: Cows

With an estimated 158 stock deaths pa in NZ, DoC’s proposed independent review of the Waikato 1080 drop that killed 8 cows is rare indeed

So … “the Department of Conservation (DOC) is taking the extraordinary step of getting an independent review of a 1080 operation in which cows were subsequently killed…” (tvnz)

“Extraordinary” alright. In the midst of the growing current NZ-wide distrust of the poison that’s constantly been touted as next to harmless, DoC appears to be in damage control mode as their 1080 edifice cracks & crumbles, making much here of the scenario that the cows allegedly broke through a fence to the 1080-treated adjacent area. Listen to the video however as this family are interviewed. A lot of questions remain unanswered. Scrambling to control the public perception of 1080 now with independent reviews to prove their credibility, yet killing 89 of NZ’s iconic treasured native Kiwi garnered not ONE test to see if any of them died of 1080 poisoning. Small wonder they are losing credibility. Then was their opportunity to prove to us all that the Kiwi did not die of 1080 poisoning but back then the public believed all the glossy brochures that told us only pests died from 1080.

One of the owners notes that they have not found one dead possum (one of those pests we’re told are ‘targeted’, a miracle given 1080 kills ALL oxygen breathing animals and organisms, including insects … it was developed initially as an insecticide) … and to state the obvious, this land could clearly have been covered by bait stations. Why was an aerial drop used? We are frequently told aerial drops are required for inaccessible areas. It is routinely applied however ‘near homes, farm boundaries, public highways and into rivers from which drinking water is drawn’. Many examples of this have been highlighted more recently as the issue has come under closer scrutiny.

The point here also is, this is not an isolated & rare incident. DoC’s investigation of such incidents however is. They should really order reviews on all of the other stock deaths that slipped under the radar, many on account of being hidden in the paperwork. Yes farmers are asked to declare their stock deaths (farmers who want compensation for those losses) as something other than stock deaths. Hear farmers interviewed on that at this link.

A working document summarizing significant poisoning events connected to aerial poisoning for pest control in NZ estimates the total numbers of deaths in farmed deer/cattle as being 3,408, estimated in 1976 to be approximately 158 per year. This would total approx. 10,000 since 1954. Actual recorded data is likely to be a small percentage of the whole total.

Dr Meriel Watts records the incident in the ’90s where 570 sheep were poisoned by 1080, with sheep still dying six months later.

Total numbers of dogs: could be as high as 6816 per year which equals 429,408 over 63 years of aerial poisoning operations.

Total numbers of human poisoning incidents: approx. 31 individuals (more pending)

Read the full information at this link.

Below is a link to tvnz’s article on the independent review.

https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/doc-orders-rare-independent-review-waikato-1080-drop-killed-cows

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DoC’s latest by-kill – 10 cows poisoned by 1080, 13 Sept, 2018, bees feeding on carcasses

The farm with the cow deaths adjoins Mapara Wildlife Reserve, administered by the NZ Department of Conservation. 1080 baits were photographed in the neighbouring farm paddock. Bees could be seen feeding on the poisoned carcasses…  so 1080 is potentially going into our NZ honey!!!

This is not an irregular occurrence folks, remember the news hitherto hidden from the ’90s of 570+ dead sheep, reported by Dr Meriel Watts! See the working document on poisoning by 1080 being compiled still as we speak. Since publishing some of these farm deaths it’s become very apparent by feedback from farmers that we are only seeing the tip of the iceberg. Remember, the incidents are hidden by DoC in the paper work.

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10 cows POISONED by 1080 13/09/2018.  Video at the source shows a bee feeding on the poisoned protein/salt on the poisoned carcass. DOC is out of control. Photos & Videos- Lefur Dan

The series of 1080 poisonings in 1963 that led to the UK & the EU banning the deadly substance

The Smarden 1080/1081 poisoning is important as an incident because it led to the banning of this chemical in the UK and later the EU. A ‘large number’ of rats and other animals died as a result of a poisoned pony used as pet food and at least 20 horses and cattle died as a result of the contaminated water near a 1080 pesticide factory. From my own read of the article & the poisonings around the factory, there were 78 domestic animals poisoned (cats & dogs), seven sheep, 20 odd cows & several calves, one goat and two guinea pigs. (There are two articles here):

The forgotten story of how a toxic spill and a book launched Britain’s environmental movement

Today we take for granted an awareness of environmental matters, but this was not always the case. It could be said that in Britain there was a moment when that environmental consciousness arrived. When in 1963 some farm animals in the parish of Smarden in Kent became sick and died, suspicions fell on a nearby pesticide factory run by a division of Rentokil Laboratories. The events that followed amounted to one of the first environmental scandals in contemporary British history – one that would galvanise the environmental movement.

It became clear that the factory, a large shed in the middle of farmland, was manufacturing toxic chemicals and that a leak of one of these, fluoroacetamide, led to Britain’s first documented livestock mass poisoning. The incident might have passed by as only a historical footnote, but instead the Smarden leak quickly became a national concern with international implications, and has cast a long shadow across the approach to intensive agriculture in the UK in the years since.

Part of why this incident had such major repercussions is due to timing, coming as it did at the same time as American writer Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring was first published in the UK. Seen as the first polemic of the environmental movement, Carson’s book was a significant catalyst to the emergence of modern environmentalism on both sides of the Atlantic.

An ecological narrative arrives

Houghton Mifflin Company

Local veterinarian Douglas Good had unique knowledge of fluoride poisoning having worked with a leading expert in South Africa and on cases of animals affected by industrial fluoride poisoning in England. Taking his cue from Carson, Good disseminated what he called a “short story” about the incident to the press, putting across the Smarden incident as not simply a local industrial waste spill, but as deadly evidence of the pervasiveness of toxic pesticides in the environment. Acknowledging his inspiration, Good concluded his narrative by declaring that the “subject of Rachel Carson’s book Silent Spring had become a reality here in the heart of the Garden of England”.

The media placed the Smarden incident within a Carson-inspired ecological critique of the dangers of an intensive, industrial approach to agriculture. Good, like Carson, was a trained scientist. Like her, he raised concerns about technocracy – governmental administration underpinned by scientific and technological expertise. As the Smarden incident unfolded, it highlighted the risks and hazards which accompanied the government’s commitment to industrial development. Tensions arose between veterinarians, government scientists, local government, media, and business interests.

A chemical double agent

While the use of inorganic poisons as pesticides stretches back to antiquity, large-scale use of organic pesticides is a 20th-century phenomenon. Fluoroacetamide is a toxic organic pesticide with nefarious origins.

A cartoon that appeared in Punch on February 12, 1964). PunchAuthor provided

The two world wars fostered a massive growth of the chemical industry, and fluoroacetamide was a pesticide that arose from the search for lethal chemical weapons. After the war it was approved for use as a poison for use against rodents and insects – it was not uncommon for the science, technology, institutions, and language of chemical warfare to be redirected to the problem of agricultural pest control during peacetime. But by the time of the Smarden incident in the early 1960s, the origin of these chemicals was seen as damning evidence of the perniciousness of the military-industrial complex and its impact on the environment.

READ MORE

https://theconversation.com/the-forgotten-story-of-how-a-toxic-spill-and-a-book-launched-britains-environmental-movement-72895


 

The Smarden (1080/1081) Poisoning, UK – 1963

by F.D.T. Good, M.R.C.V.S.
I live and practice in Tenterden near the village of Smarden in the Weald of Kent where
there is a small factory, which makes orchard sprays.
In January 1963, a man who worked at the factory brought a four-month old Labrador
puppy to my surgery. It was having convulsions and after treatment appeared to be
making an uneventful recovery. Two weeks later the puppy was brought back to the
surgery, together with its litter brother. Both were dead, having had fits earlier in the day.
The owner suspected poisoning and wanted a post mortem examination. I explained the
difficulties of this unless one knew what poison to suspect, and reluctantly he went away
not knowing what had killed his puppies which had been so well that morning.
On Benenden Fair Day, a Saturday in mid-May, I was called to GREAT OMENDEN FARM
where a client had lost five sheep suddenly. They were being loaded for sale. A few
minutes before they appeared normal and just sank to the ground and were dead. This
was a mile from the factory. The post-mortem examination revealed nothing of
significance to indicate the cause of death. I was baffled. The Veterinary Investigation
Centre at Wye had closed down for the weekend. A sixth sheep died at Benenden Fair and a seventh with the new owner at Rye. Sheep can die suddenly from a number of infectious diseases but there was no reason to suspect any of these.
The farm manager asked me whether I had heard about three of his neighbour’s cows,
which died a few days before. This was Mr. Jull and his sons Cyril and Norman at Roberts
Farm. It was a fine afternoon and this was my last visit of the day, so we took a walk along a stream, which ran through his neighbour’s land. We noticed that the further we went upstream, the less clear the water became. The vegetation in the ditches was black and dead. The stream originated alongside the factory, which made pesticides. The water on which the cattle and sheep depended for drinking water became suspected. Water
samples were collected and internal organs from the dead sheep were taken to the County Analytical Laboratory at Maidstone. Telephone calls to my neighbouring veterinary practice at Ashford established that they had been attending three cows at Roberts Farm. We were mystified. They knew the factory made methyl bromide, and one of the ponds smelt of bromide.
The following day, Sunday, I was called urgently to attend a goat at Limes Land Farm
which lay directly across the main road from the factory. This client used to work there
and I asked him what they made. Amongst the many pesticides he mentioned was
fluoroacetamide (1081), a rat poison. The goat was trembling and in a convulsive state.
She died a few hours later. Many meetings transpired between the Ashford veterinary practice, the factory manager and myself. Analytical test results bean to come through. Fluorides were present to the extent of 5 parts per million, but bromides were a hundred times more. Sulphuric acid was also present in the water. The sheep specimens revealed no chemicals of any significance. Testing of the ditches and ponds for bromides were carried out at intervals.
The acid had been neutralized by the factory management with washing soda and only
bromides appeared to remain. Testing for fluorides was abandoned in view of the alarming quantities of bromide present. The Kent River Board, responsible for the
prevention of pollution of watercourses was alerted. The factory manager told me that
fluoroacetamide could not possibly have got into the ditches, but he was able to account
for the bromides and acid. The black chemical residue from the manufacture of
fluoroacetamide had been pumped out onto the factory land for months and the Kent
River Board assured me that this could only be carried downwards into the soil.
All ditches and ponds on Great Omenden, Kelsham and Roberts Farms were fenced off to
prevent access by livestock. The remainder of the young Friesian herd on Roberts Farm
was kept under close observation by the Ashford veterinary surgeons. No more deaths
occurred and we felt a little easier. We had at least prevented further deaths. Mr. Lowe, the farmer at Great Omenden, also kept pigs, poultry and cattle, as well as two
pet dogs, one of them a sturdy and obedient foxhound. A month after the sheep deaths,
and after all acid had disappeared from his ponds and ditches, the foxhound was taken ill at night. I will use the housekeepers words:- “At 1 am he jumped onto my bed, a thing he never does…his eyes staring and big…trembling a little and teeth bared as he panted and seemed mad…I was frightened…I let him out of the bedroom and he fell downstairs…he stumbled out of doors and went onto the green…there he fell over, head bent backwards and his legs kicking as he gasped for air…a horrible noise from his throat as he breathed…his eyes were very big…then he got up, looking wildly around, then shot away and we did not see him again alive.”
His actions were suggestive of fearful hallucinations. The following morning he was
found drowned in a pond. A post-mortem examination in the forecourt of my surgery
showed only the signs of death from drowning, and the big meal he had eaten the evening before was undigested in his stomach. The owner could not accept my post-mortem certificate. What had caused the madness before he bolted away in terror? I explained this as being due to severe abdominal pain and colic. The dog had been out hunting the previous afternoon and given a big meal on his return that evening, when he was in an exhausted condition. Mr. Lowe was still not satisfied. He had lost sheep, his neighbour had lost cattle, this was still poisoning! But how could it be? The water analyses for acid and bromide were almost normal, and the bromides, if responsible, would only have a sedative effect and not one of stimulation. Doubt grew in my mind. The Veterinary Investigation Centre was not so concerned with dogs, and besides they would be reluctant to intervene as litigation might be involved. Meanwhile the cows at Roberts Farm were reported to be normal to the casual observer.
Cyril Jull knew their milk yields had fallen, they were less alert than usual, and they were easily tired. If made to hurry, they would stop and pant like a dog. A few calves, which were born strong and healthy, died in convulsions before they were a few hours old. Mr. Patterson, the Ministry Veterinary Surgeon at Wye was again pressed to come to our aid. Yes, he was willing to do so if we could tell him what poison to look for. The factory sold scores of pesticides, from the more complex chlorinated hydrocarbons, DDT,
Lindane, Parathion, down to the simpler copper, arsenic, zinc and sulphur ones. Was one
to start at the top of the list and work down, or try one’s luck with a pin? The de la Warr
Laboratories at Oxford offered me their help and in July a team of three visited Tenterden and took apparatus out to Roberts Farm. Within minutes of setting up their apparatus they diagnosed fluoroacetate (1080), much to the surprise of the farmer and myself.

READ MORE

https://fluorideinformationaustralia.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/fluoro-pesticides-the-smarden-1080-1081-poisoning-pdf.pdf

 

See also the BMJ peer-reviewed article:

Mishaps With Rat Poison,  British Medical Journal, Vol. 1, No. 5380 (Feb. 15, 1964), pp. 387-388 Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25397402

SOURCE (cited with permission):

Poison Register Working Document

COPYRIGHT MATERIAL. WORKING DOCUMENT. Intellectual Property of Clean Green New Zealand Trust, Reg Charity no: CC54185. Collated by Dr Ursula Edgington, Michelle Terry, Clyde & Steve Graf, Kathy White and Sue Grey LLB (Hons), BSc, RSHDipPHI & other citizens.

New Zealand Register of Unintended human, stock, wildlife, dogs, native birds & aquatic life. and other poisoning incidents and deaths from aerial Compound 1080 & brodifacoum operations between 1954 and 2018. http://1080science.co.nz/

 

DoC continues to drop 1080 into waterways with impunity, in spite of the manufacturer’s warnings – this time into a Coromandel dairy farmer’s supply that feeds his stock

From the GrafBoys’ TV-Wild channel:

Published on Mar 16, 2018

Dairy farmer Bevan Fox talks about 1080 poison in his dairy shed water supply (footage from most recent aerial 1080 poison operation across the southern Coromandel Peninsula) …


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Whenuakite in the Coromandel Peninsula
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The the NZ poison manufacturer’s warning label states not to drop pellets into the waterways!

 

Copy of warnings re water.png

 

 

 

What’s in our meat? … and is NZ really GE free?

I purchased pork chops recently, and specifically chose the brand that advertises itself as being humane to its animals. Nice grassed grazing (for their chooks and pigs), outdoor huts with lots of hay. Definitely free range which is refreshing in a world where we’re seeing the steady growth of factory farming. The pigs and chooks looked happy indeed.

Not having done too much homework of late on this front, as in I buy organic when I can but mostly restrict my meat intake … I thought I’d better contact the manager and just check, do they feed their animals non GE food?

Well, the reply confirmed my suspicions and of course confirmed for me, no more pork, or any other meat, that’s not organic. Occasionally I obtain produce … vegetables, fruit and eggs, from growers who don’t use sprays of any kind which is next best to organic and less costly. In the instance of the pork, the manager told me he couldn’t rule out that the pigs weren’t eating GE feed as some of their soya feed is sourced from the US which he acknowledged meant it could quite well be GE. So … they are working on getting alternative feed but as yet … no … no guarantees. To recap here, it is definitely great to see farmers treating their animals well, housing them properly with room to roam and forage … definitely a huge improvement on the crates and tightly enclosed concrete and steel pens that occasionally feature on the news when animal activists expose them. So kudos to this farmer on that aspect. However, the GE food is definitely of concern, and especially if the animal is destined for your plate.

A couple of years ago I read a local book called ‘Seeds of Distrust’ by respected local investigative journalist, Nicky Hager. Our country, good old New Zealand, is touted world wide as being amongst other things ‘clean and green’, ‘pristine’, ‘unspoilt’ (the Rangitikei’s official logo), ‘GE free’ and even ‘nuclear free’ (it helps attract business). Interestingly, as an aside on nuclear free, radiation levels have been recorded at danger levels in the South Island. Fukushima possibly? That is definitely worse than what we’re told and definitely not all sorted by any stretch of the imagination.

Anyway, Hager’s book details the events surrounding the planting of GE sweet corn in several locations here in 2000. When this came to light the current Prime Minister at the time, Helen Clarke, ordered these be pulled up. As is the usual with such events, some discussion went on for a time and eventually it turns out, the corn was not pulled up, but was left to come to full harvest. And our threshold of acceptability for GE content was raised as well. Problem solved as it were. Thanks to big-business lobbying (corporate persuasion) and to Helen Clarke, the GE sweet corn plants were allowed to spread their pollen and were harvested for sale in NZ and overseas. The rest of the contaminated seed batch was also approved for planting and the public not told.  Do you still believe everything the Government tells you?

This has been a good reminder for me, don’t buy supermarket meat, or any meat that isn’t organic. Unless you know who bred and killed it. Otherwise you may likely be ingesting GE food.

I’ve replied again to the company that ‘can’t guarantee’ the pigs don’t eat GE feed, with a link to one of Jeffrey Smith’s videos (included below) about what the GE food does to animals’ livers. The animals are reported to smell highly putrid when slaughtered and their livers are obviously diseased. Which does remind me of the recent furore in the South Island when around 200 cows died after eating swedes that are herbicide tolerant. Predictably the link between swedes and these deaths has been all but wiped off the radar but that’s a topic for another post. Herbicide tolerant by the way, means that the crop can be sprayed with herbicide (as is the case with GE crops that are sprayed with glyphosate) killing the weeds but not the crop. The crop retains residues of the herbicide and of course whoever/whatever eats the crop ingests the herbicide as well. This is why glyphosate is being found in human blood, urine and breast milk, even in people who don’t use glyphosate. It is in our environment.

You can learn more about the glyphosate link to GE food on the Glyphosate page here on this site. I plan to include organic and GE sections to the Food page shortly. Another excellent resource, the one that educated me as to what Genetic Engineering of our food is all about, is the book ‘Hard to Swallow’ by Jeffrey Smith (who is featured on the video here).

The Stock Deaths from 1080 Poison & how DOC is Hiding them in the Paper Work – Still Trust Them?

Farmers talk of their losses in this clip from the Graf Boys’ ‘Poisoning Paradise’ doco. Deaths described by those interviews include 6 cows, 13 deer, 250 sheep, 160 sheep, cattle and more. When farmers are compensated for their losses they’re declared as, in one case, ‘track maintenance’ and another, ‘stock food’. Included for one farmer was the requirement to sign a confidentiality clause. Complete dishonesty & whitewash by our authorities. Those mandated with ensuring your safety. Still trust them? The clip goes on to discuss the risks of the poison entering our food chain … very real risks if you listen to the eye witness evidence. Possum exports rejected by Japan because they’d seen documentary evidence on 1080 poison drops amongst our animals. A must watch. Please share. Show it to the nay sayers.
EnvirowatchRangitikei

1080 Poison New Zealand

See the TheGrafBoys YT channel and website for more videos. Educate yourself on 1080 poisoning. See also http://1080science.co.nz/

See also our 1080 pages for info & links, &/or search ‘categories’ drop down box for further related articles (at left of any page). 

Like our FB page &/or follow our blog (right of any page) to help spread the word on all the untruths we have been told – we are about exposing corruption and lies!  Use the share buttons! 

Thank you!

EnvirowatchRangitikei

Which Milk Beats All Other Milks?

From Natural Society website, by Barbara Minton:

It can take some effort to find a ‘healthy’ commercially-prepared substitute for cow’s milk. One will go through a number of different milk products before even finding which is best; but know this, there is an alternative to conventional cow’s milk that stands out above the rest.

Raw milk gives a child relief and healing from chronic eczema

“Eight months ago, Shaylin Downs struggled to make it to school. Her chronic eczema saw her spend days in a wheelchair, travelling to Taranaki Base Hospital three times a week for treatment, unable to enjoy many of the opportunities her school friends did…”

This little girl spent some days wheelchair bound & up to three days a week getting hospital treatment for her eczema. Any parent knows the agony such a child goes through … the itching … unable to scratch and sleepless nights. Yet after a recommendation to try drinking raw milk she is now able to enjoy a normal life. What a wonderful story.

And there are other stories out there like this one. I know personally of kids who suffer eczema if drinking treated milk, but don’t with raw.

Raw milk can still be obtained in NZ, although in some countries it is banned because of health scares. The need to be super sterilized went to the other end of the spectrum and much of the goodness contained in raw is destroyed. Modern equipment and the production of organic raw however means the product’s quality is stringently controlled. Like any food item, you treat it with respect and heed all the requirements regarding cleanliness and refrigeration. I personally buy organic raw, have done for nearly ten years and I seldom ever drink the treated product now.

Read the Taranaki article HERE

Read about the general health benefits of raw milk HERE

Read (from one MD) about the controversy over raw versus treated HERE 

And from another MD on the benefits of raw HERE

Do your own research and make an informed decision. If you opt for raw, you can buy it here in the Rangitikei. There are outlets around, you need to ask locally for them. There was one in Marton (raw) now ceased sadly because of the increasing charges imposed by the authorities in meeting stringent standards. This matches the world wide trend to shut such sources down in favour of processed milk which again, contains little nutrients compared to the raw counterpart. Even organic supermarket milk is heated according to standards so again, the nutrients are diminished. Very sad all around. Our forbears drank milk straight from the cow as did I as a child before it suddenly became a health risk. Interestingly nobody I knew of back then ever got sick or died from drinking raw milk. Doctors even prescribed it for health. Gone are the days.