Tag Archives: brodifacoum

Poison found in sealife samples THREE YEARS after an aerial brodifacoum poison operation (Ecocide Awareness NZ)

From Ecocide Awareness NZ

Staff from New Zealand Dept of Conservation are often employed as ‘consultants’ for overseas ‘pest’ eradication projects. One example of such an eradication attempt comes from Wake Atoll, known as ‘Wake Island’ – which is between Hawaii and Guam in the northern Pacific Ocean. It is made up of Wake, (525 ha), Peale (95 ha), and Wilkes Islands (76 ha).

Wake is an unincorporated U.S. territory that is managed by the Department of Defense, U.S. Air Force. About 70 people reside on Wake (military personnel and contractors). Wake has approximately 19 km of coastline and is an important breeding area for many species of seabirds.Importantly, the coastline is also fished by the local residents for sport and food.

In 2012 an aerial brodifacoum poisoning operation took place over the islands to try to eradicate rats. How long brodifacoum persists in the environment is unclear, but we know it can potentially affect the food chain. These residues may impact on fish that are caught by Wake Island residents for sport and consumption. Three months after the poisoning, 5 out of 48 samples had “detectable levels” of poison – toxicologists therefore recommended a 942 day fishing ban after initial testing was done. But how much longer would the pesticide be in the food chain?

In 2015 – THREE YEARS AFTER this aerial operation of brodifacoum – samples from various marine life were taken. The scientists found that some fish (1 of 8 bluefin trevally, and 4 of 4 blacktail snapper, all from within a lagoon) had low but detectable levels of brodifacoum residues.

The scientists suggest that outcomes from their investigation should provide a comprehensive idea of the risks of contamination in marine life over the longer term from using pesticides aerially. In the article, the authors state “All reasonable efforts should be made to minimize unnecessary environmental and nontarget exposures (e.g., through precise application methods) and all risk assessments must consider the specific context of proposed action [poisoning the environment].”

However, an aerial distribution from helicopter of a lethal poison can NEVER be ‘precise’. The environment and the residents’ health have been put at risk.Reference: Siers, Shane R.; Shiels, Aaron B.; Volker, Steven F.; Rex, Kristen; and Pitt, William C., “Brodifacoum residues in fish three years after an island-wide rat eradication attempt in the tropical Pacific” (2020). USDA National Wildlife Research Center – Staff Publications. 2313.https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/icwdm_usdanwrc/2313

Kathy White says: “Remember the Hauraki Gulf brodifacoum poison drop? The dead dolphins, penguins, dogs and toxic sea-slugs? And the DOC man interviewed on TV, lying about having tested the penguins and them being negative. Fortunately there was an astute journalist who probed and discovered they hadn’t tested them – they had just examined them. Years later, in Penny Fisher’s journal articles, it talked about detecting brodifacoum in the penguins and them thinking the penguins may have died of starvation. They did later studies on anticoagulant rodenticides in penguins and found more than 50% of South Island test subjects had at least one anticoagulant in them.”

Image 1: Wake Island aerial view. Source: Pinterest

Image 2: Brodifacoum baits Source: Wellington Council

#publichealth#pesticide#brodifacoum#ban1080#contamination#healthandsafety#toxicology#ecology#foodsafety#cleanwater

NZ’s DoC & Ospri set for another poisoning spree: cyanide and 1080 near Hokitika & near Kaikoura, more cyanide (Ecocide awareness)

Ecocide Awareness NZ

Happy New Year and it’s with a sad heart that we provide a ‘heads up’ for some of the forthcoming next round of proposed poisoning operations in Aotearoa New Zealand – planned by Dept of Conservation and/or Ospri. Other poison operations may not be made public. Three examples are shown in images below, taken from the current online Pesticide Summary. The South Island’s West Coast is already heavily poisoned, with deadly diphacinone, brodifacoum, 1080, cyanide and other toxins. The cocktail effect of these multiple chemicals in sublethal amounts is a total unknown in terms of the impact on our public health. But, despite this, a further mixture of a cyanide and 1080 (bait stations and hand laying) is planned near Hokitika. Meanwhile, on the East Coast near Kaikoura, more cyanide will be laid in bait bags near areas already previously poisoned with 1080. What are the effects of a mix of cyanide and 1080? The streams feed the drinking water supplies for residents and stock. The streams all eventually meet the sea, of course. Are the Kiwi tourists paying to be whale-watchers, aware of the invisible toxins those wildlife face? And thirdly (but by no means, finally) aerial 1080 poison is proposed to be spread by helicopter over 7412 hectares adjacent to sacred Aoraki Mt Cook.

Will 2021 bring any relief from these poisons to our land and water?

#poison#contamination#pesticides#safewater#publichealth#fraud#water#ecocide#newzealand#corruption

A duck shot in Nthn Southland contains what may well be a poison pellet – duck shooters beware

THIS DUCK SHOT TODAY (5/5/19) IN NORTHERN SOUTHLAND APPEARS TO HAVE EATEN POISON

By Carol Sawyer

“This photo was sent to me today by a concerned duckshoooter. He shot it today in Northern Southland and discovered the green paste in its digestive tract when he was cleaning it. This is a bisection of its entrails at the tail end.”

[Note: please see this previous post on the dangers of eating duck. Our wild food sources have become endangered with the liberal & frequent spreading of poisons into our environment. A precautionary approach is advisable.]

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(Facebook have called it “violent or graphic content… it is a duck prepared for someone’s dinner, for goodness sake!)

It may be 1080, Pindone, or Brodifacoum. We don’t know.

This photo was sent to me today by a concerned duckshoooter. He shot it today in Northern Southland and discovered the green paste in its digestive tract when he was cleaning it. This is a bisection of its entrails at the tail end.

A lot of discussion has ensued behind the scenes. Ducks can have greenish poo, for sure, but that is more a khaki brown/green colour. None of us have ever seen any duck poo this colour (and I used to have about 300 wild ducks arrive in duckshooting season to join the home mob, so am VERY familiar with their ‘deposits’).

Birds can apparently live for quite a while after ingesting 1080 poison and longer with Pindone or Brodifacoum presumably.

During duckshooting season, particularly in this first weekend of the season, they are dispersing widely and flying longer distances to find safe places, too.

A lethally poisoned duck may well survive for many, many hours flying time.

In an article on vertebrate pesticides in ‘Veterinary Toxicology for Australia and New Zealand, 2017’, Rosalind Dalefield BVSc PhD DABVT DABT, states “Birds have survived up to 10 days after dosing with sodium fluoroacetate”. ( 1080 ).

(In the ERMA Review it is stated ““[weka and pukeko] time to death 4-18 [hours]” & “[time to death for blackbirds dosed with 1080] 10.8-30.5 hours”).

Header Photo Credit: skeeze  Pixabay.com

A news site in India has noticed NZ’s love affair with “poisons, profits and pests”

Word’s getting around isn’t it? Remember this one? One of the great aspects of social media & the internet. All being severely curtailed however as we speak.

From taazakhabarnews.com

inhumane-death-by-1080
Inhumane death by 1080

Almost on the verge of losing its native species New Zealand is beginning to realize the environmental implications of 60 years of indiscriminate aerial application of toxic pesticides and chemicals like 1080 (sodium fluoroacetate) in its forest ecosystem. Secondary poisoning due to rat poison is posing a big threat for the birds of prey and insectivores. Though no one wanted it that way, birds are being poisoned when the insects eat the poisonous rat bait and the birds then eat the insects.

For such a small country, New Zealand packs a poisonous punch. Its Department of Conservation (DoC) has a toolbox full of chemical weapons and is willing and able to use them. Last year alone saw aerial broadcasting of 800+ tonnes of toxic bait across an estimated 700,000 HAs of its native forest ecosystems (including lakes and rivers) in a campaign against rats dubbed the Battle for the Birds. The poison used was 1080 (sodium fluoroacetate), which kills by interrupting cellular respiration and affects all life forms requiring oxygen. The extreme toxicity and agonizing mode of action has sparked much controversy about the inhumanity of using such a poison. There is also no known antidote and in the opinion of many 1080 should have been banned outright years ago. In New Zealand, it has been used for over 60 years to control introduced species such as rabbits, possums and rats.

native-rock-wren-endangered
Native rock wren  – NZ’s only true alpine bird that spends its entire life above the bush line in often difficult climatic conditions

Poisons are a booming business, especially for the “treatment” of rats on islands. In this instance, the poison is brodifacoum a second-generation anticoagulant used for island eradications. The method of aerial application is like “blitzkrieg”, but lack of accuracy and by kill risk means that these operations can impact, as is often witnessed, on sea mammals, fish and birds.

Brodifacoum is also persistent and bioaccumulative.

The New Zealand state-owned enterprise, Animal Control Products imports as much as 90% of the world’s supply of pure manufactured 1080 annually from the United State’s Tull Chemical Company (the sole manufacturer). This is then processed into various baits. But New Zealand’s pest control industry is not all about spreading bait from helicopters or ground-based operations in its own ecosystem, it is also about export opportunities. Animal Control Products has found a niche market for selling New Zealand expertise and products for pest control solutions and island restorations. It is a lucrative sideline for this government. New Zealand provides the skill to kill, marketing its expertise and branding, and proudly presiding over island eradications.

But does the world need such a thing as island eradications and ecosystem restorations? And if we are to believe the world does need such drastic measures, the question needs to asked. Are poisons really working? The respected science journal, Nature, reported in 2012 that “Killing rats is killing birds”. Canada and the United States are planning to restrict the use of blood-thinning rat poisons, such as brodifacoum.

The disastrous eradication of Alaska’s Rat Island used 42 tonnes of brodifacoum. This resulted in the demise of 420 birds including 46 bald eagles that tragically came to dine on rat. One would hope that the island eradication industry would think twice about using poisons that have far reaching environmental implications. Rats will go wherever we go. But still, aerial poisoning of islands is heralded as the “final solution” to the problem of rats. This way of looking at island conservation as a poisoning opportunity was born in New Zealand.

READ MORE

http://taazakhabarnews.com/poisons-profits-and-pests/?fbclid=IwAR1-XQnt4kTdwdAa0KdYAmj9QnI_N-iAFC4I3PgjX4hFXuQp8DktjsthrtA

Cruel poisons will never bring back the birdsong

Mainstream has posted an opinion piece by Fiona McQueen on our diminishing birds.

OPINION: Dave Hansford has launched yet another attack against those opposed to pest control in the Brook Waimarama Sanctuary, near Nelson. This sanctuary has just reopened, surrounded by a 14km pest-proof fence. It will be stocked with kiwi, kākāriki and kākā.

The nasty part is that brodifacoum, a poison graded 8/10 for its ability to cause animal suffering, needed to be introduced first to kill pests inside the fence. It also killed native birds including weka and pukeko.

Do the ends justify the means? A human equivalent would be if a ruling party decided to clear out a country, exterminating all unwanted people and restocking with different people who are representatives of a “chosen race”. Wait a minute, hasn’t that been done before?

Andrea Midgen, chief executive of the SPCA, recently spoke out about the associated animal cruelty saying, “1080 (and other poisons) causes intense, prolonged suffering to animals and therefore we cannot support its use”.

READ MORE

https://www.stuff.co.nz/environment/109905094/cruel-poisons-will-never-bring-back-the-birdsong?fbclid=IwAR3yH5TEU4e8nFP4bqDYU-feu_R-hLPL8QrGFVY1Gaoro3l22tFCbfC6gJ8

There has been a recent spate of animal & bird poisonings on Auckland’s North Shore

From FRIENDS OF SHERWOOD, Auckland
CITIZENS INITIATED REFERENDUM TO BAN ALL CRUEL POISONS.
There has been a recent spate of poisonings on Auckland’s North Shore with distressed residents finding dead and dying birds in Rothesay Bay and Browns Bay for the past couple of weeks.
Fiona Macdougall from Rothesay Bay posted on the local Neighbourly site:

I’m fortunate my dog who ate a dead pigeon wasn’t sick but my friends cat was very ill and a very costly vet bill.
and Jo Brosnahan also from Rothesay Bay wrote:

I contacted both DOC and the Council yesterday. Two drugged pigeons were pecked to death yesterday afternoon on Rothesay Bay Beach, amid another 3 carcasses. There was a dead seagull further down the beach and a dead penguin. I was concerned not just about the cruelty to the pigeons but also with impact on the food chain; other wildlife, dogs and children on the beach.  The Council Actionline said it was not their area  and put me on to DOC. DOC have advised this morning that they and the council and police are aware of the situation and it is suspected to be a poison, alphachloralose, aimed at the pigeons. I would observe that the poisoning is still occurring, so be aware of this if you are going to the Browns Bay or Rothesay Bay beaches.  I cannot imagine who would think this is an ok thing to do!

Lorraine Cunniffe , another resident from Rothesay Bay,  added:

It is so disturbing to witness this cruelty in our beautiful neighbour hood. Early evening yesterday dead birds in clear view by the playground and beach at Rothesay also seagull pecked remains. Young family’s on their beach walks so upset to see this 😔

Browns Bay resident and co-ordinator of the local community group Friends of Sherwood, Tricia Cheel, is not so sure that it can be attributed to alphachloralose if a pigeon carcass has made a cat so ill and indeed if the penguin also died of poison, and notes that the council has recently also deposited many bait stations along the beach front, and even playgrounds in these areas, and  she is presently nursing a young wood pigeon that was found on Saturday night unable to fly and very unbalanced and distressed.

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(Image to left) Named Boris he (or she?) will be available for interview by appointment only! 
Note the golden tufts of baby feathers and contemplate how anyone in their right mind would risk harming him / her.
 
Whatever the truth of the matter is it is but a mere whiff of the full horror of having these poisons used so freely throughout the  country and Friends of Sherwood say that their proposed Citizens Initiated Referendum to ban all cruel and inhumane poisons is long overdue and look forward to the question being put to all New Zealand voters just as soon as possible.
 
Unfortunately it will take time to collect the 320,000 signatures needed but it is hoped that the whole process may be circumvented sooner rather  than later,  by Prime Minister, Jacinda Ardern, who has said her government embodies kindness as well as strength, and it gives her the opportunity to demonstrate both those characteristics by acting immediately to put an end to the torture thousands of animals suffer every day, both in suburbia and in the wild.
The proposal complies with the requirements of the House of Representatives and the Office of the Clerk has advised that the question will go out for public comment on Wednesday 21st November by way of advertisements in national newspapers and notification in the New Zealand Gazette.
People will have until 11th January to comment on the wording with the final question being determined by 7th February 2019; after which time Friends of Sherwood will have 12 months to collect the necessary signatures of 10% of all eligible voters.
Co-ordinator of the group since it began in June 1990, Tricia Cheel says that although they twice successfully delayed the drop of 1080  poison in the Hunuas with interim injunctions, it eventually went ahead leaving two more families devastated by the cruel loss of their beloved dogs, and further down the line a further 8 cows were gruesomely tortured to death by this same poison dropped indiscriminately by helicopter, while countless more animals suffered agonizing deaths, mostly unseen and unheard, in the forests.
Banning the deadly 1080 poison will only go part way to addressing the problem since as more and more animals are demonised in the headlong  rush to be predator free by 2050, many more animals are set to suffer similar fates with other equally cruel poisons, including brodifacoum, pindone, cholecalciferol and PAPP,  with the latter specifically targeting cats.
The unfortunate by-kill includes many of the species that are purportedly being ‘protected’,  but even without that  inconvenient truth, as the question states, the intense and prolonged suffering these poisons inflict can never be justified.

Between 2012 & 2014, Auckland Council tested wild pigs for brodifacoum (rat poison) residues … of the 14 tested, 13 were positive for poison residues (Clyde Graf)

From Clyde Graf

Many people in New Zealand rely on wild pigs to feed the family.

Between 2012 and 2014, Auckland Council tested wild pigs for brodifacoum (rat poison) poison residues. Of the 14 pigs tested, 13 of them were positive for poison residues.

The Department of Conservation aerially spreads brodifacoum bait across offshore islands to eradicate targeted wildlife. The DoC policy for using the poison on the mainland is however, far more strict. (see below)

Oddly, brodifacoum can be brought over the counter at hardware stores all around New Zealand, and some regional councils dish tonnes of the stuff out to local communities to spread around – like on the Coromandel Peninsula, where there are pigs present.

Perhaps a review of the use of this poison is warranted??? And while they’re at it, put a moratorium on 1080 poison as well …

OIA request details below:

brofidacoum testing 1

 

brofidacoum testing 2

No Govt minister would meet with a Waikato Regional Councillor & a Nelson Lawyer this week to accept an incident register on 1080 – but then the NZ Govt is MAKING 1080

There have been thousands of cases of poisoned farm animals, non-targeted wildlife, pets, and people following 1080 poison and brodifacoum aerial operations across New Zealand.

Not surprisingly, those involved with the aerial poisoning drops – our government, the Department of Conservation, TB Free, regional councils … and ironically, those that sign the drops off – the district health boards – have never compiled a register of the incidents that have taken place over the years.

So some intellects from around the country decided to put together some of the known poisoning cases, including people that have been crying out to be heard for so long.

In the following video clip lawyer Sue Grey and Waikato Regional Councillor for Taupo, Kathy White, explain how they attempted to present the poisoning register to members of parliament (on a typically windy day) …


For information on the Govt owned Whanganui 1080 factory go here.