Tag Archives: ACP

This year alone we are throwing enough 1080 poison on NZ to kill 85 million people – and we don’t even test our food for 1080 residues!

By Carol Sawyer

Recent information from Animal Control Products Ltd is that DoC buy between 30% and 50% of their 1080 product every year, that OSPRI and regional councils account for another 40%, and (presumably) ZIP and Predator Free NZ account for the rest…. between 10% and 30%.

As DoC have produced maps showing they intend to be covering 1.124 million ha with aerial 1080 this year, at a rate of 1.5 to 2 kgs per ha, and even if they account for a 50% buy-up of the poison, we can safely assume a total of about 4,000 tonnes of 1080 poison baits will be spread on our land this year.

That is 6,000kgs of pure 1080 poison (at the standard 0.15% pure poison per bait rate).. So at an LD50 of 0.5mg per kg bodyweight that means 35mg can kill a 70kg human being. That works out to be theoretically enough 1080 dropped on NZ this year to poison 171,428,571 x 70kg people, with half of them, 85,714,285, having a lethal dose!

LD50 : [ Based on fatal or near-fatal cases of human poisonings, the dangerous dose for humans is 0.5-2.0 mg/kg BW (Negherbon 1959)]

(LD50 stands for Lethal Dose 50 – killing with poison is not an exact science so an LD50 is used, which means that one can assume 50% of the people poisoned will die. It doesn’t mean the other 50% get off scot-free!)

Photo credit: supplied by Carol Sawyer


If you are new to NZ’s 1080 poisoning program here is a good article to start with …

WHY ARE PEOPLE SO CONCERNED ABOUT 1080?

A must watch also is Poisoning Paradise, the doco made by the GrafBoys (banned from screening on NZ TV, yet a 4x international award winner). Their website is tv-wild.com. Their doco is a very comprehensive overview with the independent science to illustrate the question marks that remain over the use of this poison. Check out also 1080science.co.nz for the independent science.

And the 1080 pages at the main menu, particularly the sub tab, ‘suspected 1080 poisoning cases’. Finally, remember what the retired MD Charlie Baycroft said recently …‘if you die from 1080 poisoning, nobody will know  because the Ministry of Health is bullying NZ Doctors into not testing for 1080′. 

EWR

 

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A news site in India has noticed NZ’s love affair with “poisons, profits and pests”

Word’s getting around isn’t it? Remember this one? One of the great aspects of social media & the internet. All being severely curtailed however as we speak.

From taazakhabarnews.com

inhumane-death-by-1080
Inhumane death by 1080

Almost on the verge of losing its native species New Zealand is beginning to realize the environmental implications of 60 years of indiscriminate aerial application of toxic pesticides and chemicals like 1080 (sodium fluoroacetate) in its forest ecosystem. Secondary poisoning due to rat poison is posing a big threat for the birds of prey and insectivores. Though no one wanted it that way, birds are being poisoned when the insects eat the poisonous rat bait and the birds then eat the insects.

For such a small country, New Zealand packs a poisonous punch. Its Department of Conservation (DoC) has a toolbox full of chemical weapons and is willing and able to use them. Last year alone saw aerial broadcasting of 800+ tonnes of toxic bait across an estimated 700,000 HAs of its native forest ecosystems (including lakes and rivers) in a campaign against rats dubbed the Battle for the Birds. The poison used was 1080 (sodium fluoroacetate), which kills by interrupting cellular respiration and affects all life forms requiring oxygen. The extreme toxicity and agonizing mode of action has sparked much controversy about the inhumanity of using such a poison. There is also no known antidote and in the opinion of many 1080 should have been banned outright years ago. In New Zealand, it has been used for over 60 years to control introduced species such as rabbits, possums and rats.

native-rock-wren-endangered
Native rock wren  – NZ’s only true alpine bird that spends its entire life above the bush line in often difficult climatic conditions

Poisons are a booming business, especially for the “treatment” of rats on islands. In this instance, the poison is brodifacoum a second-generation anticoagulant used for island eradications. The method of aerial application is like “blitzkrieg”, but lack of accuracy and by kill risk means that these operations can impact, as is often witnessed, on sea mammals, fish and birds.

Brodifacoum is also persistent and bioaccumulative.

The New Zealand state-owned enterprise, Animal Control Products imports as much as 90% of the world’s supply of pure manufactured 1080 annually from the United State’s Tull Chemical Company (the sole manufacturer). This is then processed into various baits. But New Zealand’s pest control industry is not all about spreading bait from helicopters or ground-based operations in its own ecosystem, it is also about export opportunities. Animal Control Products has found a niche market for selling New Zealand expertise and products for pest control solutions and island restorations. It is a lucrative sideline for this government. New Zealand provides the skill to kill, marketing its expertise and branding, and proudly presiding over island eradications.

But does the world need such a thing as island eradications and ecosystem restorations? And if we are to believe the world does need such drastic measures, the question needs to asked. Are poisons really working? The respected science journal, Nature, reported in 2012 that “Killing rats is killing birds”. Canada and the United States are planning to restrict the use of blood-thinning rat poisons, such as brodifacoum.

The disastrous eradication of Alaska’s Rat Island used 42 tonnes of brodifacoum. This resulted in the demise of 420 birds including 46 bald eagles that tragically came to dine on rat. One would hope that the island eradication industry would think twice about using poisons that have far reaching environmental implications. Rats will go wherever we go. But still, aerial poisoning of islands is heralded as the “final solution” to the problem of rats. This way of looking at island conservation as a poisoning opportunity was born in New Zealand.

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http://taazakhabarnews.com/poisons-profits-and-pests/?fbclid=IwAR1-XQnt4kTdwdAa0KdYAmj9QnI_N-iAFC4I3PgjX4hFXuQp8DktjsthrtA