Category Archives: Pesticides

Dead Bird Nests Contain 36 Different Pesticides, Including DDT

In ‘clean green’ NZ (not) of course our authorities can kill off 10,000 birds in one drop with 1080 poison (link below article), and believe it or not, they are ‘saving our birds’. EWR

From achnews.org

In Brussels and Florence, people began to express concern over the rising finds of dead newborn birds (tits) in their nests.

When these concerned people notified the bird conservation association Vogelbescherming Vlaanderen and the ecological gardening association Velt, they began a crowd-funded investigation. Over 1000 people sent in dead tits and nests, which were analyzed and a report was published with shocking results.

“We found a total of 36 different pesticides in 95 mesh nests,” Geert Gommers, a pesticide expert said in a statement.

The birds’ nests revealed traces of 36 different fungicides, herbicides, insecticides and biocides. The alarm came when they found traces of DDT, an insecticide banned since 1974, in 89 of the 95 nests examined.

“That DDT is still present in our environment after all this time is worrying,” the statement read.

READ MORE

(NOTE there is a link to the report in the article however the report is not in English, you may have to use google translate):

http://achnews.org/2019/09/16/dead-bird-nests-contain-36-different-pesticides-including-ddt/?fbclid=IwAR2h5uHa2HsF4FW1Y57czEpwjFVo-1oaAKSxNuDYjgzgJNqgouZCUgNfzc4

RELATED:  A NZ LANDCARE SCIENTIST ESTIMATES THE LIKELY DEATH TOLL FROM AN OTAGO 1080 DROP IN 2002 TO BE AROUND 10,000 BIRDS … https://envirowatchrangitikei.wordpress.com/2018/10/14/a-nz-landcare-scientist-estimates-the-likely-death-toll-from-an-otago-1080-drop-in-2002-to-be-around-10000-birds/


 

Photo: Report at https://drive.google.com/file/d/1yYwh7Av-AZk9uDjDUZdbiw328Cl7u8d2/view

Advertisements

Scientists Test Three Solutions for Cleaning Pesticides Off Produce: The Winner is Clear, Chemical-Free and Surprisingly Cheap

Each year, the release of the Environmental Working Group’s ‘Clean Fifteen’ and ‘Dirty Dozen’ lists inspire countless health conscious shoppers looking for the best deals on produce as free from toxic pesticides as possible.

This year’s list followed a similar pattern, with the exception of two well known crops that contain “less than one percent detectable pesticides,” even in their non-organic iteraitons.

Despite the good news, there’s still a pesticide-related problem that shows few signs of slowing in the United States, especially with Bayer set to take over Monsanto in the coming weeks.

The bad news is that glyphosate and other chemicals are more abundant in our environment than ever before. But the good news is that organic food is making a comeback, and there are plenty of ways to mitigate your exposure to harmful pesticides.

One of them is by using the best quality homemade produce wash for your fruits and vegetables, and according to a study from the University of Massachusetts, there is one clear winner that happens to be cheap, simple and effective.

University Study Reveals: Baking Soda Better Than Chlorine for Washing Vegetables

The study, published in October 2017 in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry by a team of six researchers, looked at three main possible solutions for cleaning produce: pure water, a solution of bleach containing chlorine, and a solution made of water and baking soda.

Organic Gala apples that were coated with the fungicide thiabendazole, or phosmet, a pesticide, by the scientists for research purposes, were used for the study. They were then washed with one of the three solutions.

“We want(ed) to see whether or not the factory level (of washing) is already effective” for removing the chemicals, lead researcher Dr. Lili He said.

In the end, the winner was clear: baking soda took home the number one spot, because of its ability to make the pesticides degrade faster than the other two solutions.

https://althealthworks.com/16002/university-scientists-test-three-solutions-for-cleaning-pesticides-off-of-vegetables-the-winner-is-clear-chemical-free-and-surprisingly-cheap/?utm_campaign=meetedgar&utm_medium=social&utm_source=meetedgar.com&fbclid=IwAR1aFamhD0PiWU3R7pnNVw9JilL7ett83Ix8ClpomrJG-EB8n5MNaGn_7c0

Massive global insect decline could have ‘catastrophic’ environmental impact, study says

NZ, like many places globally, is slathered with hundreds of various poisons. No surprises that our insects are dying. Read Dr Meriel Watts’ book The Poisoning of New Zealand. Glyphosate is NZ’s fave.  As also is the insecticide 1080, dumped annually over our environment by the tonne.

RELATED: THE 1080 INSECTICIDE IS NOT KILLING 50% OF OUR INSECTS SAYS DOC – AND NO LONG TERM MONITORING IN SIGHT

(From CNN) 

Insect populations are declining precipitously worldwide due to pesticide use and other factors, with a potentially “catastrophic” effect on the planet, a study has warned.

More than 40% of insect species could become extinct in the next few decades, according to the “Worldwide decline of the entomofauna: A review of its drivers” report, published in the journal Biological Conservation.

Insect biomass is declining by a staggering 2.5% a year, a rate that indicates widespread extinctions within a century, the report found.
In addition to the 40% at risk of dying out, a third of species are endangered — numbers that could cause the collapse of the planet’s ecosystems with a devastating impact on life on Earth.
The report, co-authored by scientists from the universities of Sydney and Queensland and the China Academy of Agricultural Sciences, looked at dozens of existing reports on insect decline published over the past three decades, and examined the reasons behind the falling numbers to produce the alarming global picture.

Its lead author, Francisco Sanchez-Bayo, of the School of Life and Environmental Sciences at the University of Sydney, called the study the first truly global examination of the issue.
While the focus in the past has been on the decline in vertebrate animal biodiversity, this study stressed the importance of insect life on interconnected ecosystems and the food chain. Bugs make up around 70% of all animal species.

The repercussions of insect extinction would be “catastrophic to say the least,” according to the report, as insects have been at “the structural and functional base of many of the world’s ecosystems since their rise … almost 400 million years ago.”
Key causes of the decline included “habitat loss and conversion to intensive agriculture and urbanization,” pollution, particularly from pesticides and fertilizers, as well as biological factors, such as “pathogens and introduced species” and climate change.

While large numbers of specialist insects, which fill a specific ecological niche, and general insects were declining, a small group of adaptable insects were seeing their numbers rise — but nowhere near enough to arrest the decline, the report found.
READ MORE (INCLUDES VIDEOS)

https://edition.cnn.com/2019/02/11/health/insect-decline-study-intl/index.html?fbclid=IwAR3NhgrllHwK3UOG3cY1-jLYaDy8Yx094qQrZduHSarz83h2sSvQ4F6qd-k

8 Popular Tea Bag Companies That Contain Illegal Amounts of Deadly Pesticides

Note: Twinings the worst. I posted on their substituting chemical flavouring in lieu of real bergamot in their Earl Grey brand a while back.

From livelovefruit.com

There’s nothing nicer than sipping on a warm cup of herbal tea on a cold midwinter’s day. But besides being tasty and warming, tea provides a host of different health benefits – that is, unless your tea is soaked in pesticides.

CBC News recently conducted an investigation on the pesticide levels in some of the most major tea-producing companies. Using an accredited lab, the investigators utilized testing methods employed by the National Food Inspection Agency to test pesticide residues on dry tea leaves.

Pesticides in Tea

The investigators at CBC found that over half of all teas tested had pesticide residues that were above the legally acceptable limit. Multiple chemicals were found in 8 out of 10 teas, with one brand of tea containing over 22 different types of pesticides (Uncle Lee’s Legends of China tea brand).

A large majority of these pesticides are currently being banned in several countries due to the health risks they pose to workers that handle them, and the negative effects they have on the environment (as well as the health of those that consume the products).

Environmental lawyer, David Boyd, told CBC:

“This is very worrisome from a number of perspectives…The presence of so many pesticides on a single product and so many products that exceed the maximum residue limits for pesticides, suggests that we’re seeing very poor agricultural practices in countries, which poses risk to the environment where these products are being grown; which pose risk to the farm workers who are growing these crops, and ultimately pose risk to the Canadians who are consuming these products.”

READ MORE

https://livelovefruit.com/8-popular-tea-bag-companies-contain-illegal-amounts-deadly-pesticides/

Pesticides Compound Antibiotic Resistance

From Dr Mercola

STORY AT-A-GLANCE

  • Agrichemicals and antibiotics in combination increase the evolution of antibiotic resistance
  • Bacteria may develop antibiotic resistance up to 100,000 times faster when they’re exposed to certain herbicides in the environment, particularly widely used herbicides like glyphosate (Roundup) and dicamba (Kamba)
  • It’s believed that other chemicals in the environment may also increase resistance in microbes, much like herbicides; however, regulatory agencies don’t regulate or test them for such effects — even among the 3,000 top-volume chemicals produced annually
  • Reducing the use of antibiotics may not be enough to stop this looming public health disaster — unless the use of herbicides and other chemicals that affect antibiotic resistance is also curbed

Antibiotic resistance is often pegged as a problem caused by the overuse of antibiotics — and this is a driving factor — but research suggests it may actually be only one piece to the puzzle. Environmental factors may be accelerating the rise of antibiotic resistance as well, particularly widely used herbicides like glyphosate (Roundup) and dicamba (Kamba).

Research from University of Canterbury researchers revealed that agrichemicals and antibiotics in combination increase the evolution of antibiotic resistance. In fact, bacteria may develop antibiotic resistance up to 100,000 times faster when they’re exposed to certain herbicides in the environment.1

“The combination of chemicals to which bacteria are exposed in the modern environment should be addressed alongside antibiotic use if we are to preserve antibiotics in the long term,” study author Jack Heinemann of the University of Canterbury, said in a news release.2

‘Like Trying to Put Out a Fire of Antibiotic Resistance With Gasoline’

The study found cases when exposure to herbicides made the antibiotics more toxic while at the same time increasing the antibiotic resistance. Heinemann explained why this is an alarming finding:

“We are inclined to think that when a drug or other chemical makes antibiotics more potent, that should be a good thing. But it also makes the antibiotic more effective at promoting resistance when the antibiotic is at lower concentrations, as we more often find in the environment … Such combinations can be like trying to put out the raging fire of antibiotic resistance with gasoline.”

The results suggest that herbicides enhance the ability of antibiotics to become antibiotic resistant and that such resistance may be acquired at rates much faster than those predicted in laboratory conditions. Previously, research by Heinemann and colleagues found that commonly used herbicides promote antibiotic resistance by priming pathogens to more readily become resistant to antibiotics.3

This includes Roundup (the actual formulation of Roundup, not just its active ingredient glyphosate in isolation), which was shown to increase the antibiotic-resistant prowess of E. coli and salmonella, along with dicamba and 2,4-D. Rodale News reported:4

“The way Roundup causes this effect is likely by causing the bacteria to turn on a set of genes that are normally off, [study author] Heinemann says. ‘These genes are for ‘pumps’ or ‘porins,’ proteins that pump out toxic compounds or reduce the rate at which they get inside of the bacteria …’

Once these genes are turned on by the herbicide, then the bacteria can also resist antibiotics. If bacteria were to encounter only the antibiotic, they would instead have been killed. In a sense, the herbicide is ‘immunizing’ the bacteria to the antibiotic … This change occurs at levels commonly used on farm field crops, lawns, gardens and parks.”

READ MORE

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2018/10/30/pesticides-compound-antibiotic-resistance.aspx

Politicians join with conservation groups in calling on the EPA to ban bee-killing pesticides until a full scientific review is conducted

(Natural News) State politicians and conservation groups urged the United States Environmental Protection Agency(EPA) to hold off approval of bee-killing neonics in order to conduct a full scientific review of the pesticides involved, reported an EcoWatch article.

Congressmen Earl Blumenauer and Jim McGovern recently reintroduced the Saving America’s Pollinators Act, a bill that blocks new neonicotinoid insecticides while the EPA is investigating the full extent of their effects on bees, humans, other animals, and the environment.

Various conservation groups and environmental organizations have also presented a huge collection of public comments to the EPA. More than 100,000 individuals are pressing the agency to reduce the widespread use of neonicotinoid pesticides.

Neonics have been cited by numerous studies as a major driving factor in the decline of pollinator populations. The insecticides also threaten birds and aquatic invertebrates, according to research by EPA-employed scientists. (Related: EPA, Monsanto face lawsuit over pesticide drift that damaged millions of acres and threatened endangered species.)

Numerous studies say neonics are deadly

The EPA is currently investigating the preliminary ecological and human health risks posed by the neonicotinoids clothianidin, thiamethoxam, and dinotefuran. It is also performing a preliminary ecological risk assessment for the widely-used imidacloprid.

According to the agency’s initial risk assessments, neonics turned out to be lethal to birds that consumed grass, seeds, and dead insects contaminated by the insecticides.

“EPA’s recent assessment confirms what the science has already shown,” remarked Nichelle Harriott of the environmental group Beyond Pesticides. “[That] neonicotinoids are highly toxic not just to bees, but to aquatic species and birds [also]. She stressed the importance of the EPA taking actions against those chemicals to protect U.S. waterways and pollinators.

“Our nation’s beekeepers continue to suffer unacceptable mortality of 40 percent annually and higher,” said Andrew Kimbrell of the Center for Food Safety.

According to him, neonicotinoid contamination of numerous water sources endanger both wild pollinators and wetland birds. Kimbrell urged the EPA to accept the findings of numerous scientific literature and take appropriate actions to reduce the negative effects of these insecticides.

Research efforts showed that even small amounts of neonics can deprive migrating songbirds of their sense of direction when they need it most. And a United States Geological Survey study determined that the pesticide level in the Great Lakes are endangering important aquatic insects.

“By harming pollinators like bees and butterflies, and natural pest control agents like birds and beneficial insects, neonicotinoids are sabotaging the very organisms on which farmers depend,” said Cynthia Palmer of the American Bird Conservancy.

Neonics have already contaminated U.S. food supplies. A joint study by the American Bird Conservancy and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health discovered neonicotinoids in food samples taken from dining halls in the U.S. Capitol building.

As many as five different neonics were found in meals that congressmen, senators, and their staff eat every day.

EPA dragging feet on neonics crisis

Neonicotinoids are banned in Europe, while the Pest Management Regulatory Agency of Canada urges a similar ban on imidacloprid, the most widely-used neonic formula.

“The only thing that is keeping the U.S. from joining other nations in banning the use of these devastating poisons is the immense profit that fuels PR campaigns, intense lobbying efforts, and questionable studies designed to mislead us on the harm these poisons do,” accused Dr. Luke Goembel of the Central Maryland Beekeepers Association.

READ MORE

https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-03-04-conservation-groups-epa-ban-bee-killing-pesticides-scientific-review.html

Pesticides Are Found in 85 Percent of Fresh Produce

By Dr. Mercola

Eating fresh produce is essential to staying healthy and warding off chronic disease, but if you purchase conventional varieties, you’re probably getting some pesticide residues along with many of your bites.

The health effects of these residues are being debated, but considering the many health risks linked to pesticides — from infertility and birth defects to endocrine disruption, neurological disorders and cancer1 — there’s good reason to keep your exposure as low as possible, including opting for organic produce as much as possible.

According to the latest pesticide residue report released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), which used 2015 data and was released in November 2016, about 85 percent of the more than 10,000 samples they tested contained pesticide residues.2 The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) also compiled an annual pesticide residue report using 2015 data, which was released in November 2017.3 It, too, showed the majority of U.S. fruits and vegetables are contaminated with pesticide residues.

Most US Produce Contains Pesticide Residues

The FDA’s sampling of nearly 6,000 foods revealed that fruits and vegetables are most frequently contaminated with pesticide residues. Notably, 82 percent of domestic fruits and 62 percent of domestic vegetables had such residues, including:4

  • 97 percent of apples
  • 83 percent of grapes
  • 60 percent of tomatoes
  • 57 percent of mushrooms
  • 53 percent of plums

Among imported fruits and vegetables, 57 percent and 47 percent contained residues, respectively, and the imported varieties were more likely to contain illegal levels of pesticide residues compared to the domestic samples. Raising red flags is the fact that the neurotoxic pesticide chlorpyrifos was the fourth most-prevalent chemical in the samples out of the more than 200 pesticides detected.5

The chemical, known to disrupt brain development and cause brain damage, neurological abnormalities, reduced IQ and aggressiveness in children, has a half-life on food of several weeks, making nonorganic foods a major source of exposure. The FDA was quick to point out that “over 98 percent of domestic and 90 percent of imported foods were compliant with federal standards,” but this isn’t saying much if the federal standards are too lax to protect public health.

Former EPA senior scientist and director of the Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, Tracey Woodruff, told Environmental Health News, “Risk assessment practices at federal agencies have not been updated for modern scientific principles, including accounting for the fact that people are exposed to multiple chemicals and that certain groups, such as genetically susceptible, the very young and old can be at greater risk of exposure.”6

READ MORE

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2018/01/16/pesticide-residues-in-fresh-produce.aspx

Could DoC’s recent poisoning of the Coromandel have anything to do with Whangamatā’s bee die off this week?

whangamata.png

If you check this map* of DoC’s recent pest treatment of the Coromandel that included 1080 drops, the Otahu block which was part of that, is right below Whangamatā. Whangamatā has this past week been stricken with 1000s of dying bees … washed ashore at Whangamatā’s popular beach, currently also inundated with holiday makers.
*(Note: you will need to scroll to the bottom of the page at the link & click on ‘I agree’ to access the map). 

NZ Herald reports 75 bee stings over the week from the dying insects. The problem began according to Radio NZ on Monday of last week (Christmas Day). Mainstream media has chosen to report it four days later on December 29th, the Friday before New Year when it will likely fly under the radar as folk head off for the long weekend. A time worn tactic with mainstream. NZ Herald reported it on the 30th (Saturday) but only as one paragraph within an article about the large beach crowd, not considered important enough to have a headline of its own. Die offs are becoming almost ho hum these days it seems. Pipi, toheroa, eels, blue bottles more recently and if you google bees this isn’t the first. I saw one item from 2014. There were more. By and large the phenomenon it appears is being downplayed.

It is unclear from DoC’s website maps and info whether 1080 was actually dropped on that block, but it is clear that it was treated with something. Whangamatā is situated on an estuary, also the subject of controversy with conservation concerns regarding a marina built there. As the map indicates waterways (particularly note the Otahu River) flow out of the poisoned zone to the sea. We are not told exactly where the bees were found, or on which beach. There are actually two there and both are safe for swimming.

Amendment 1 Jan 2018: All three pest treatments were aerial 1080 drops. 

What I found interesting researching this, was the lack of ease of locating on Doc’s site the relevant information about the poisoned areas. I note that the map indicates 1080 was applied to the Papakai block in the Coromandel, still the other two areas (marked in red) do not indicate the poison used at all. It was only when I went to the Battle for our Birds page  that I could find dates (Oct/Nov 2017) yet there was still no clear indication of what was dropped. The Hunting page gave a little more information as in where to go to find out the drop areas but one would have thought the Walking and Tramping page would contain this important information given tourists like to walk the scenic routes. There is nothing there, the site in my opinion is not tourist friendly at all.

So there has been a die off of thousands of bees. This is so tragic, given also we have only just had recent concerns raised by bee keepers about the effects of 1080 on the bee population, particularly in the Coromandel, with bees returning it to the hives.

RELATED: A warning from the Greens in 2012,   Don’t wait until the bees are all dead

Will we find out if it was 1080 (or any other poison)? I very much doubt it given the disinclination the authorities charged with protecting our wildlife have to reporting anything bad about this ‘wonderful’ insecticide that kills all oxygen breathing animals and organisms … banned by most countries and manufactured by your government here in Kiwiland.  Neither is it likely we’ll be told if it is any of the other poisons our authorities spread liberally around our environment. Our Kiwi government has a love affair with poisons and seems to be comfortably in bed with the poison industry possibly explaining the ongoing opposition we are seeing to anybody who questions the wisdom of it. Sue Kedgely summed it up quite nicely in 2012:

I am wondering how long it will be before we stop using pesticides that are poisonous to bees. I am not optimistic that it will be quickly, given our record. We were, after all, one of the last countries in the world to ban 245T. And the response of successive governments to calls to stop using lethal pesticides has been to dither and procrastinate in the face of mounting evidence, and accept industry blandishments that they are safe…. Sue Kedgely, Green Party

Let’s hope this is investigated by Whangamatā’s regional authorities. We will only be guessing unless the insects are tested and more information is given. Why do thousands of bees suddenly die off like that? We’ve been hearing for years that once the bees go (die) we humans have only a few years left. Ah but you can rest safe because the clever people running the show are busy cobbling together their new GM varieties which of course are going to save the planet.

Here are the articles from mainstream about the bee die off:

Whangamatā inundated with dying bees

One of the country’s busiest beaches has been inundated with dying bees, creating a hazard for holidaymakers.

Surf Lifesavers at Whangamatā have gone as far as issuing a warning to beachgoers to watch out for the insects.

Deputy Head Guard Max Jones said they had dealt with dozens of first aid requests for bee stings as thousands of the insects began washing up on the beach this week.

He first noticed them washing in with the tide on Monday and said it got worse as the week progressed.

He said that by Wednesday there were thousands of bees all along the high tide mark and they had to help about 20 children who had been stung.

Mr Jones said he had never seen anything like it, and while they were trying to alert people to the problem it was difficult with so many people on the beach.

He said the bees were mainly at the high-tide line, and while the numbers appeared to have decreased people still needed to be vigilant.

SOURCE: https://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national/347165/whangamata-inundated-with-dying-bees

RELATED

But the biggest cause of injury over the week had been bee stings as thousands of dead bees washed ashore. Gibson estimated the crew had tended to 75 bee stings over the week.
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11967770

Many oppose Doc’s 1080 drops on the Coromandel
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11874204

Note: most of the links refer to our own articles, however if you consider this lop sided, I should point out that those articles contain external links. This is about saving time. You can proceed to those links yourself.

For further information on the poisons used in our environment including 1080 and glyphosate, see our main menu. Search categories or use the search box for other articles on topic. EnvirowatchRangitikei

Photo of Whangamata: Wikipedia

 

 

To all the users of Roundup, beware those ‘glyphosate’s safe’ claims – EPA’s biased assessment falls short of the most basic standards of independent research

Kiwis love this product and most I’ve found won’t hear a bar of the voluminous body of independent research. You will see them walking the streets with their backpacks, no protective gear in sight, spraying often in high winds. I’ve seen them & filmed them. They can also be alarmingly aggressive if you cross them. Councils are just as bad, many of them farmers, they refuse to hear anything bad of the manufacturers. With cancer rates now at 1 in 3 surely you would think they would want to err on the safe side and desist from using it but no, we must have our yellow berms, ditches and garden edges mustn’t we? And Monsanto wouldn’t lie to us? Would they? See our glyphosate pages. EnvirowatchRangitikei

“Migratory monarch populations have declined by 80 percent in the past two decades, and their decline has been driven in large part by the surge in glyphosate use ”  Sustainable Pulse

 

RESIZED IMG_4127.JPG
A NZ paddock sprayed with Glyphosate .. the ground is later plowed and stock will later feed on the new grass … right into the food chain

From sustainablepulse.com

A federal advisory panel of independent scientists unanimously found earlier this year that in assessing glyphosate the pesticides office at the EPA failed to follow its own guidelines for determining whether a chemical can cause cancer. In the final draft released today, the EPA stated that the guidelines “… are intended as a guidance only …” and do not necessarily have to be followed.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency released Monday a controversial analyses that rely heavily on industry studies to conclude that glyphosate poses no significant risks to humans.

The EPA review, which ignored the agency’s own guidelines for assessing cancer risks, contradicts a 2015 World Health Organization analysis of published research that determined glyphosate is a probable carcinogen.

Glyphosate is the active ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup and most widely used pesticide in the world; 300 million pounds of it are used in the U.S. each year.

“The only way the EPA could conclude that glyphosate poses no significant risks to human health was to analyze industry studies and ignore its own guidelines when estimating cancer risk,” said Nathan Donley, a senior scientist at the Center for Biological Diversity. “The EPA’s biased assessment falls short of the most basic standards of independent research and fails to give Americans an accurate picture of the risks posed by glyphosate use.”

A federal advisory panel of independent scientists unanimously found earlier this year that in assessing glyphosate the pesticides office at the EPA failed to follow its own guidelines for determining whether a chemical can cause cancer. In the final draft released today, the EPA stated that the guidelines “… are intended as a guidance only …” and do not necessarily have to be followed.

Scientists typically use previously agreed upon guidelines to prevent biases from swaying the analysis in one direction or another.

The chair of the EPA’s Cancer Assessment Review Committee, Jess Rowland, resigned in 2015 amid controversy. Emails obtained in litigation brought against Monsanto by cancer victims and their families uncovered a disturbingly cozy relationship between the EPA and Monsanto on matters involving the glyphosate risk assessment.

READ MORE

https://sustainablepulse.com/2017/12/20/epa-relies-on-industry-studies-to-give-glyphosate-new-green-light/#.WjmsXJdSCdF

The great Southland flax massacre

Photo: John Hawkins Stuff

Thanks to a reader this came to my attention. It had slipped under my radar. I’ve followed the spraying carry on that all of our councils do, fixated on tidy roadsides they spray everything to the hilt, hence the yellow ditches all along the way when you travel. I think they look untidier than long grass quite frankly but spray they must it seems. Small wonder most of our populations now test positive for glyphosate in their bloodstreams. What was sprayed in Southland here in the article was metsulfuron methyl.  Spraying everything with chemical poisonous herbicides is standard practice in NZ even though there are non toxic alternatives. You can read up on glyphosate on our Glyphosate pages. The properties of the chemical used in Southland is referred to in the article. To read more PANANZ is a good site.

Anyway it appears in Southland the roadside harakeke (flax) bushes got sprayed, now they’re a ‘nice’ yellow colour instead of green. Southlanders got up in arms and good on them. Have a read about the Southland massacre:

 

Southlanders protest the great flax massacre

stuff.co.nz
31 Oct 2017

It’s been described as the great flax massacre, and dozens of Southlanders have packed into the Orepuki Tavern to protest against it.

Members of the public filled the tavern for a public meeting on Tuesday, opposed to the long stretches of the Southern Scenic Route which are now lined with browning dead flax bushes.

Attendees expressed concerns about the aesthetic impact on the Southern Scenic Route and tourism, the possibility of the herbicidal spray entering the public water supply, and dangers to animal life and biodiversity.

Resident Louise O’Callaghan said she understood the need to keep drainage channels clear but was concerned about the amount of chemicals being used to kill flax, after driving past the spraying vehicle in April.

“I was flabbergasted, my friend and I stopped, did a U-turn and drove back,” she said.

“The time spent on one flax bush was just incredible, as was the volume of spray.”

She was also worried about chemicals escaping into the water supply, saying manufacturers of herbicidal treatments with metsulfuron methyl warn that it is very toxic to aquatic organisms and to soil.

READ MORE

https://www.stuff.co.nz/southland-times/news/98411648/southlanders-protest-the-great-flax-massacre

 

Clutha-Southland MP Hamish Walker says NZ Transport Agency to act on whacked flax

 

stuff.co.nz
13 Nov 2017

Southern scenic route motorists will once again be able to enjoy the green, green grass of home after the NZ Transport Agency agreed to clean up the aftermath of the great flax massacre.

Clutha-Southland MP Hamish Walker said he had received confirmation that the transport agency would be removing dead flax between Riverton and Clifden.

He was pleased with the decision, saying “It’s been an emotive issue in the community, so this is a great result”.

“I’m thrilled the NZTA has come to the party and agreed to remove the majority of dead flax in their area of responsibility.”

Walker was also pleased the agency would work with local iwi to protect flax on the Southern Scenic Route, saying “The Southern Scenic Route is our shopfront window for tourists”.

“Flax is not a weed, it’s an important part of the cultural and economic history of our country.”

Flax bushes past the Clifden suspension bridge were the responsibility of the Southland District Council.

READ MORE

https://www.stuff.co.nz/southland-times/news/98754674/cluthasouthland-mp-hamish-walker-says-nz-transport-agency-to-act-on-whacked-flax

RELATED:

Letters: After flax poisoners come the frackers