Category Archives: Mahia Rocket Pad

Rocket Lab’s midnight launch for US Air Force a ‘success’ for whom?

“NASA, SOCOM (Special Operations Command), DARPA (the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) and repeat customer the US Air Force” …. what a line up eh? Who ever would’ve thought? And are you feeling any safer folks? We’ve sure come a long way (downhill) from those days of the ’80s and declining US warships entry to our waters … to this. And a ‘success’ for whom?

We are courted with the employment lollipop … 100 jobs apparently. They think we’ve forgotten that along with the declining of warships we also had full employment here pre Roger Douglas’s treasonous corporate takeover. No homeless, no child poverty, no suicide …. still that’s what comes with giving up your sovereignty isn’t it?

They had fine blue skies for this launch.  Pretty rare these days. Perhaps if the NZ Corporation is planning on following her master’s lead in employing aerosol geoengineering, we could have even more of those. Or, hang on, should that read more cloudy skies?

From the NZ Herald

Rocket Lab staged its eighth successful launch at 12.20am last night from Launch Complex 1 on the Mahia Peninsula.

The “Look Ma No Hands” mission carried the first satellite for a new maritime surveillance constellation for French company Unseenlabs. It will deliver maritime data to help shipping companies monitor their own vessels, as well as threats such as pirates and illegal ships.

The launch also saw satellites deployed for rideshare provider Spaceflight, including the Global-4 satellite for US Earth-observation company BlackSky and two United States Air Force Space Command “technology demonstrators.”

Over the past 12 months, Rocket Lab has launched small satellites into space for four US government clients: NASA, SOCOM (Special Operations Command), DARPA (the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) and repeat customer the US Air Force.

Earlier, founder and chief executive Peter Beck played down Rocket Lab’s military customers, saying defence technologies like GPS where dual-use, and that his company had only launched experimental not operational payloads.

And although Rocket Lab does not make all details of a mission’s manifest public, it does have to disclose all cargo to the NZ Space Agency, with final sign-off by the agency’s minister, David Parker. Both safety and “national interest” tests are applied by the NZSA.

Rocket Lab will announce details of its ninth mission in the coming weeks as it contiunes to build toward its goal of a launch a fortnight.

Beck recently revealed his company is developing reusable rockets.

Rocket Lab has also been putting the final touches on its new launchpad, housed at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia on the US East Coast.

Beck said earlier this month that it could be one of the fastest launchpad builds ever. It had started driving piles at the beginning of the year and would be ready by year’s end.

The customer would be a US government agency.

Beck said some US government clients preferred Rocket Lab to have a US launch site.

However, the Kiwi-American company is also upgrading and expanding its assembly plant in Auckland and its Launch Complex One on the Mahia Peninsula.

Beck said NZ would remain Rocket Lab’s high-frequency launch location because of our skies and sea lanes – which, compared to the US East Coast – are empty.

His company is currently on a drive to hire another 100 staff, which will take its total complement to around 600 – most of whom are employed in NZ.

https://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=12260001

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Spying on Earth: Rocket Lab’s payloads get more and more interesting

from thespinoff

The launch of satellites for private companies that sell data to spy agencies raises fresh concerns about New Zealand’s fledgling space industry, Ollie Neas writes. 

A satellite on board Rocket Lab’s most recent mission will collect data for US spy agencies, among other customers.

The satellite belongs to US private intelligence company BlackSky and raises “residual national interest risks”, the New Zealand Space Agency says. However these risks weren’t considered serious enough to decline approval for the launch.

This mission appears to be the first time the Space Agency has raised national interest concerns about the launch of a rocket payload from New Zealand.

READ MORE

https://thespinoff.co.nz/business/01-08-2019/spying-on-earth-rocket-labs-payloads-get-more-and-more-interesting/?fbclid=IwAR2D7RxwWUvPBvGbDPxFetqnphVra4ZuQBTh9qfb3AE_xiQAaqogGWXFmIM


For other EWR articles & links on Rocket Lab search categories at left of page.

Photo Credit: Pixabay.com

Rocket Lab’s ‘Make it Rain’ launch

“…help monitor and inform decision about global warming”  … the old globalist go to for doing just about anything they want & the gullible trusting public as always fall for it hook line & sinker. And as for the ‘make it rain’ title, well some of us know they’ve been making it rain & weaponizing weather for quite some time now.
Why ever else would DARPA have their fingers in this pie?

“Rocket Lab has already launched satellites for US defence agency Darpa and the US Air Force this year….

Earlier, Beck said most defence technologies were “dual use”. Technologies that had come out of defence spending, including the internet, GPS and imaging systems that can help monitor and inform decision about global warming all gelled with his company’s motto that “We go into space to improve life on Earth.” “

from the NZ Herald

Rocket Lab’s “Make it Rain” launch has successfully liftoff, with its Electron now orbital.

The mission is the company’s seventh Electron launch and third for 2019.

READ MORE

https://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=12245117&fbclid=IwAR1ERHchfvBvDQxc_k7B70xj2Pw6rEYciIdMw-X5H7Asca8ujZpjsaC7mbk

NZ’s Mahia Rocket Lab to launch US military antenna

Space technology company Rocket Lab has confirmed its next launch will carry United States military technology.

Rocket Lab, founded by Kiwi Peter Beck, will launch an experimental antenna for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the US Department of Defense’s experimental technology division.

Beck said the launch would carry an RF Risk Reduction Deployment Demonstration (R3D2) spacecraft in a test that had been approved at the ministerial level in New Zealand.

READ MORE

https://thecontrail.com/forum/topics/rocket-lab-to-launch-us-military-antenna

Rocket Lab has just made NZ a launch pad for US defense satellites … NASA ELaNa-19 mission revealed

NOTE: Periodically & randomly the facebook share option will disappear from posts on the front (this) page. If it is not appearing, click on the heading of the article to go to its own page, usually the share button will show up there. (All else failing copy & paste the url to your facebook page).


Didn’t we just know with a partner like Lockheed Martin (& now ACC as well) that there was more to Mahia’s Rocket Lab than innocent research? Doubtless, Mahia residents will have had nil consultation on this and as to Winston Peters’ ‘disarmament and arms control minister’ label, all I can say to that is, ‘what a crock’. All adds up given the big weapons fest Key hosted before departing for wealthier climes, having wrecked everything here prior …. thanks to thecontrail.com for the alert on this.

From thespinoff.co.nz via thecontrail.com

EDUCATIONAL LAUNCH OF NANOSATELLITES (ELANA)-19 LIFT-OFF, 16 DECEMBER 2018. PHOTO: ROCKET LAB / TREVOR MAHLMANN

Its latest mission may be inadvertently exposing New Zealand to the militarisation of space, writes Ollie Neas.

Rocket Lab made history on Sunday as its first ever mission for NASA made orbit from the Mahia Peninsula. The mission was the first dedicated launch of miniature satellites, or CubeSats, for NASA by a commercial launch provider.

But this was not the only reason the Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNa)-19 was historic. It was also the first time a satellite for a US defence agency was launched from New Zealand.

Although described as an “educational” mission, ELaNa-19 included a satellite that will conduct research for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, the Pentagon agency which develops cutting-edge technology for the US military.

DARPA’s involvement with this satellite, called the SHFT-1, has not been publicly disclosed by Rocket Lab. Nor does it appear to have been disclosed to the minister for economic development, David Parker, who approved the launch.

This launch is set to be followed by another for DARPA in early 2019 as part of a US Department of Defense programme to demonstrate that it can launch satellites rapidly in the increasingly contested space environment.

These developments come after The Spinoff revealed the extent of Rocket Lab’s work for US defence agencies last month, and signal New Zealand’s creeping involvement in US programmes to enhance its military capabilities in space.

A defence and security expert says these launches expose the risk of New Zealand inadvertently militarising space, and could also undermine New Zealand’s national security.

The SHFT-1 is described in Rocket Lab press releases as a NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory satellite. But NASA’s own Orbital Debris Risk Assessment Plan for the mission indicates that the SHFT-1 is in fact a project of the DARPA Strategic Technology Office (STO), though it was designed by NASA.

The STO focuses on “technologies that enable fighting as a network to increase military effectiveness, cost leverage, and adaptability”. DARPA’s mission generally is to “maintain and advance the capabilities and technical superiority of the United States military”.

A DARPA spokesperson told The Spinoff that the SHFT-1 will measure radio frequencies to improve the performance of over-the-horizon radar ( OTHR).

OTHR is a type of radar system that can detect targets over long distances by bouncing radio waves off the ionosphere, which is a layer of the atmosphere. Its military uses include detecting missiles and stealth aircraft.

But there is no mention of DARPA or OTHR in the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment’s briefing to the economic development minister David Parker, who approved the launch, although one paragraph of the briefing is redacted.

Released under the Official Information Act, this briefing simply describes the SHFT-1 as a NASA JPL satellite that will “study high-frequency signals to support research into galactic background emissions”.

MBIE advised the Parker that it had not identified any national interest concerns from the ELaNa-19 satellites and the New Zealand Intelligence Community identified no risks to national security. Parker’s office declined to confirm to The Spinoff whether he was personally aware that the SHFT-1 is part of a DARPA project, but responded that the minister was briefed on the launch.

“The Minister is satisfied that all the payloads, including the SHFT-1, are to be used to advance science and for research and development purposes and that the mission and purpose of the payloads is not contrary to our national interest,” his office said.

The Outer Space and High-Altitude Activities Act allows the minister to veto a satellite if it is not in the national interest. Although it prohibits the launch of weapons of mass destruction, it does not preclude the use of space for military purposes generally.

MBIE was asked to comment on whether it informed the minister about DARPA’s involvement, but said it would be treating The Spinoff’s questions as an Official Information Act request. Rocket Lab, which provided comment for The Spinoff’s last article, did not reply to a request for comment about the SHFT-1.

Little has been revealed publicly about the broader SHFT programme, which stands for the Space-based High Frequency Testbed. But public records show that US federal government contracts for the programme have been awarded to the defence and weapons contractor Raytheon, the scientific research institute SRI International, and Systems & Technology LLC, a company specialising in “advanced research and development for defense, intelligence and homeland security applications”.

The second DARPA satellite to be launched from New Zealand is called the R3D2 and is part of a joint programme between DARPA and the Office of the Secretary of Defense.

Last month The Spinoff revealed that Rocket Lab would be launching this satellite but until now it was not known whether the launch would be from Rocket Lab’s New Zealand launch site on the Mahia Peninsula, its yet-to-be-constructed site in the US, or some other site entirely.

DARPA now confirms that the launch will be from the Mahia Peninsula and likely in February or March 2019. Rocket Lab has not publicised this launch in any way and has declined two invitations from The Spinoff to comment on it.

David Parker’s office says that he has been informed about DARPA’s interest in the launch but has not considered an application for the R3D2 satellite. “Each application for a payload permit is considered on a case-by-case basis against the requirements in the Outer Space and High-altitude Activities Act,” his office said.

DARPA spokesperson Jared Adams says that the R3D2, which stands for RF Risk Reduction Deployment Demonstration, will demonstrate a new type of “membrane reflect-array antenna”.

“The demo seeks to prove a smaller, faster to launch and cheaper capability, providing increased communication coverage typically covered by geo-communications satellites. The R3D2 effort is in partnership with, and sponsored by, the Office of the Secretary of Defense as part of an effort to demonstrate rapid acquisition of small satellite and launch capabilities.”

It is not clear whether other satellites will be included on this launch. But the US Department of Defense will pay Rocket Lab US$6.5 million, which is close to the US$6.95 million for the whole NASA ELaNa-19 mission.

The US Department of Defense has actively pursued rapid launch capabilities in recent years as other nations challenge its dominance in space. Responding to these challenges, the Trump Administration announced plans in August to create a dedicated Space Force as a sixth branch of the US military.

Rocket Lab’s two DARPA launches indicate that New Zealand is to play a role in US space initiatives. Terry Johanson, a lecturer at Massey University’s Centre for Defence and Security Studies, says that this may pose risks to New Zealand’s national security.

“Some of the threats are from our own cooperation with a larger partner who wants to push their own national interest, which may not necessarily align to what our national interests are in maintaining the non-militarisation of space,” he said.

“An opponent of America could see New Zealand as a more vulnerable area in which to target indirectly America’s space programme or defence program. For example, Russia, North Korea or China could potentially undertake operations here to sabotage the American defense programme.”

Johanson also suggests the government may not have full information about what is being launched from New Zealand due to the Technology Safeguards Agreement, the treaty signed to allow for the transfer of US rocket technology to New Zealand.

The agreement requires the US to provide a written statement about spacecraft it proposes to launch from New Zealand, but precludes New Zealand from launching any spacecraft that the US deems contrary to its laws or policies.

Last Thursday Winston Peters, who is the disarmament and arms control minister, announced that New Zealand will chair the Missile Technology Control Regime in 2019.

“New Zealand’s emerging space industry makes it particularly relevant at this time that we contribute to the effective international control of sensitive missile-related technologies,” Peters said.

BE SURE TO READ THE COMMENTS AT THE LINK:

https://thespinoff.co.nz/business/17-12-2018/revealed-rocket-lab-ha…

https://thecontrail.com/forum/topics/revealed-rocket-lab-has-just-made-nz-a-launch-pad-for-us-defence-

There are so many hidden references in the first article.  We are so toast.

RELATED:

China and Russia band together on controversial heating experiments to modify the atmosphere

https://thecontrail.com/forum/topics/china-and-russia-band-together-on-controversial-heating-experimen?xg_source=activity

Rocket Lab now supported by ACC … so what lies inside their secret US military contracts?

Apologies, I had to repost this as the layout turned to custard with no editing option & half the info disappearing …… so

We have posted previously on the Rocket Lab.  (For other articles on topic use the search box). Partnering / funded with / by defense contractor Lockheed Martin, the NZ Govt (which note, is a corporation) and now ACC (also a corporation)? This is something I’m watching. The article below is from thespinoff.co.nz

Ollie Neas | Guest writer
Investigation

Rocket Lab is a celebrated New Zealand success story, with a stated mission to open access to space and improve life on Earth. Yet many of its key contracts are with the US military and their suppliers. Ollie Neas reports on the dark side of a local business hero.

Last Friday Rocket Lab announced that it had secured US$140m (NZ$206m) in new funding from a range of investors, including the publicly-owned ACC.

After a launch the Sunday before, this announcement marked the second time in a week that hundreds of international media outlets took notice of Rocket Lab and, by extension, New Zealand.

At home, though, the issue has been whether New Zealand deserves more of the credit for the billion-dollar company’s success, with Chris Keall in the New Zealand Herald querying descriptions of Rocket Lab as an “American start-up”.

However, there is another side to Rocket Lab, one that raises questions about New Zealand’s – and ACC’s – support for the company.

READ MORE

https://thespinoff.co.nz/business/20-11-2018/what-lies-inside-rocket-labs-secret-us-military-contracts/?fbclid=IwAR2OUz4hGRcVoXiuAlsNOilnCx0Mx89-QHZ-hVIT5n66uxLKRytRCx1qrZk#.W_xjQ1fFQpo.facebook

NZ’s 43K+ homeless can now sleep easy on their park benches as Mahia Rocket lab’s new partnership gears to protect us all from terrorists

Thanks to thecontrail.com for this link.

Rocket Lab to launch satellite with ‘defence’ applications to tackle terrorism from Mahia

A satellite with “security and defence” applications, due to be launched from Mahia, is expected to help security services across the globe intercept secret radio transmissions from terrorists and drug smugglers… NZ Herald

So Rocket Lab, already the recipient of $25million of your tax payer dollars Kiwis, is potentially playing a part in protecting us from the threat of terrorists,  sparked off by the inside job controlled demolition nine eleven. Yes it is set to “geolocate maritime radio to guard borders, protect assets and save lives.”  …geolocating “VHF transmissions from marine vessels to provide global activity-based intelligence data as a service.” The essential intelligence.

I am certain the 43K+ homeless NZers will be pleased that all of this money will be spent ensuring they will sleep easy in their cars and on park benches. 

The NZ Herald is reporting on the latest at the Mahia Rocket Lab on the East Coast of NZ….

“A satellite with “security and defence” applications, due to be launched from Mahia, is expected to help security services across the globe intercept secret radio transmissions from terrorists and drug smugglers.

Orbital launch provider Rocket Lab has signed a contract with Luxembourg-based satellite technology company Kleos Space to launch “scouting mission satellites” that will geolocate maritime radio to “guard borders, protect assets and save lives”.

The Kleos Scouting Mission (KSM) will form the cornerstones of a 20-system constellation that will geolocate VHF transmissions from marine vessels to provide global activity-based intelligence data as a service.

The Kleos Space constellation will detect radio transmissions and pinpoint their origin and timing, enabling governments and organisations to detect activity such as drug and people smuggling, illegal fishing and piracy, and also identify those in need of search and rescue at sea.

Built by GomSpace, the Kleos Space satellites are scheduled to launch on an Electron rocket from Rocket Lab’s Launch Complex-1facility in Mahia, in mid-2019.

“Small satellite technology like that of Kleos Space is increasingly playing a vital role in informing decisions on the ground that protect people and the environment,” Rocket Lab chief executive Peter Beck said.

“We’re thrilled to be partnering with Kleos Space to provide them with the rapid and reliable access to orbit needed to build and replenish small satellite constellations.”

The satellites will be integrated into Rocket Lab’s in-house designed and built Maxwell dispensers and deployed from the Electron kick stage to low Earth orbit.

Rocket Lab’s kick stage, powered by the 3D printed Curie engine, is designed to circularise small satellite orbits and perform complex manoeuvres, including multiple engine burns, to deploy many satellites into different orbits.

This provides unmatched mission flexibility, making it ideal for deploying and replenishing constellations.

https://thecontrail.com/profiles/blogs/aotearoa-enters-the-militarisation-of-space-at-mahia

Photo: Hawke’s Bay Today

Five Eyes military exercise takes place under pretext of ‘Air Show’ as Jacinda Adern welcomes Obama in preparation of US joining TPPA in 2020.

From the Facebook page of Postman Investigates New Current affairs NZ Investigative News  with Ben VidgenGlenn HolmesJohn MintoDave Hoppy and Dai Mitchell.

The United States Air Force has confirmed its intention to have the world-renowned F-16 Fighting Falcon Jet Demonstration Team attend Wanaka from the Misawa Air Force base in Japan. Also displaying at the Airshow will be the C-17 Globemaster Demonstration Team out of Hawaii. Both the F-16s and the C-17 will operate out of Christchurch International Airport for the duration of the Airshow. Christchurch Airport is to host the Americans on the ground as according to the airshow organisers they’re unable to land at Wanaka. The RNZAF will help out with flying members of the US contingent through to the Airshow at various times over the weekend say the show’s organisers.

The timing of the visit which can expect aircraft to fly in ahead of the show coincides with the visit of former President Barack Obama and a month ahead of Hillary Clinton’s visit organized by the US Chamber of Commerce and US Business Council, the organization heavily involved in lobbying for the TPPA and believed to be in discussion regarding the reentry of the US into the treaty following the next American election (thought Trump hinted at the re-entry of USA into TPPA at Davos in Janaury this year). Therefore potentially the aircraft may also be participating in the anticipated visit by Obama to the South Island following the sighting of private jets, used in the advanced Secret Serivce of Bill Clinton during APEC 1999, in Dunedin earlier this month.

The American aircraft will not only ensure the biggest ever line up of modern military aircraft at the Wanaka airshow but the RNZAF intends to have one of the largest turnouts of its aircraft types at the Airshow. This is in addition to other Five Eyes (the defacto military arm of the TPPA) members attending the show including the Australians who are sending a Spartan transport aircraft along with Hawk Jets while the French are coming with the CASA transport jet.

Wanaka is currently also the site of a NASA facility funded by the US military, one of several facilities to pop up or expand using equipment built by known military contractors, these include the expanded Waihopai facility in Blenheim, Rocket lab in Gisborne, a private facility however funded by the US Navy, expanded tracking facilities in Bluff, among other known or suspected sites upgraded or added to in the past few years.
Further the visit by contemporary military aircraft at this year’s air show is not the only time we have seen an influx of Five Eyes military aircraft to New Zealand.

On August 3 2017,” New Zealand Defense Minister Mark Mitchell confirmed that Singapore’s fighter jets would be participating in an upcoming military exercise between the two countries. The news came as the two sides consider options for basing these aircraft in one of the country’s largest airfields for training as part of their broader effort to further their military cooperation in the coming years”. (Ohakea will also be basing a Singapore cyber intelligence unit and comes at the time Five Eyes is using Information Dominance warfare to suppress dissenting voices on social media).

Singapore is believed to have left equipment when their intelligence, cyber intelligence and artillery trained here during Operation Rolling Thunder while the USA left helicopters and other equipment here during Operation Koru in 2015. These exercises mark an escalated presence by Five Eyes security forces since 2011 including several visits by the US marines based in Hawaii. Our sources suggest this includes building barracks for the Marines (at this stage able to house 300 soldiers) in Waiouru for permanent “winter training”.
In January 2017, Singapore and New Zealand officials discussed stepping up cooperation through various ways. One of these opportunities had been for Singapore to set up a pilot training base at Ohakea Air Base, New Zealand’s third largest airfield, recently subject to a $2 billion dollar upgrade, as the land-scarce city state continues to look for other partners that can provide room for it to train its armed forces.

In February 2017 two Singapore F-15s were at the Ohakea Air Base for celebrations commemorating the 80th anniversary of the Royal New Zealand Air Force. And in June, when New Zealand’s air force chief Tony Davies paid a visit to Singapore, he viewed a static display of the F-15 fighter aircraft at Paya Lebar Air Base.

On August 3, Mitchell, the defense minister, announced that a Republic of Singapore Air Force (RSAF) training exercise hosted by the Royal New Zealand Air Force would take place at Ohakea Air Force base from 30 August to 25 September. Jacinda Adern and Winston Peters who have both confirmed their commitment to both the TPPA and the Five Eyes security alliance have yet to suggest this proposal or the 20 billion earmarked under national will be scrapped under their administration.

This month Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said her ministers were working to get an exemption for New Zealand from the US’ imposition of tariffs on steel and aluminium. This supports the Postman’s claims last month that the current trade war and aluminum tariffs would be used by the USA to reinstate it self in the TPPA and have the currently suspended TPPA provision reinstated. The Tiwai smelter employs over 3000* people and is the backbone of Southland economy which generates over 20% pf the country’s gross domestic product.

Adern told reporters New Zealand had a strong case for an exemption because of its “long defense and security relationship with the United States stating New Zealand was clearly not an intended target of the tariffs, given its steel exports to the US were small. Ardern stated New Zealand’s relationship was similar to Australia’s in many ways and Australia had been given the exemption. Both New Zealand and Australia are ‘five eyes’ intelligence partners with the US.

*Tiwai’s website cites 800 employees

Rocket Lab’s “Secret Payload” is a Big Disco Ball. Really. Honestly.

In my humble opinion this is light & superficial info that deflects from the real purpose of the base. The info to which we are not privy. Call me conspiratorial if you wish, but we’ll probably never know unless something goes wrong of course.

Photo: NewsHub

Rocket Lab has angered astronomers across the world after putting a glittering disco ball into orbit.
New Zealand’s first-ever successful orbital launch was hailed last week, but on Thursday the company revealed in addition to two mapping satellites, the Electron rocket was carrying a reflective sphere it called the ‘Humanity Star’.
It holds no practical purpose, except to “get people to go outside and look up”, according to Rocket Lab founder Peter Beck.

But people who look up every day for living are outraged, expressing their displeasure with the company’s space junk on social media.
“Intentionally bright long-term space graffiti. Thanks a lot @RocketLab,” astronomer Mike Brown, of the California Institute of Technology, wrote on Twitter.
“Most of us would not think it cute if I stuck a big flashing strobe-light on a polar bear, or emblazoned my company slogan across the perilous upper reaches of Everest,” Columbia University director of astrobiology Caleb Scharf wrote for science magazine Scientific American.
“Jamming a brilliantly glinting sphere into the heavens feels similarly abusive.”
New York University astrophysicist Benjamin Pope called the Humanity Star “short-lived and kind of cool”, but said it would get in the way of real satellites.
Even Kiwi scientists are tut-tutting Rocket Lab.

http://thecontrail.com/forum/topics/rocket-lab-s-secret-payload-is-a-big-disco-ball-really-honestly?commentId=4744723%3AComment%3A863301

GO HERE FOR A PLETHORA OF OTHER ARTICLES ON TOPIC:

https://www.google.co.nz/search?client=opera&q=ROCKET+LAB+DISCO+BALL+NEWS+HUB&sourceid=opera&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

AND HERE FOR OUR OTHER ARTICLES ON TOPIC:

https://envirowatchrangitikei.wordpress.com/category/mahia-rocket-pad/

NZ has a rocket base that’s received $25 million Govt funding & is financially supported by the world’s largest weapons trader, Lockheed Martin

Time for a reblog of this one, with a launch that’s happened this week. I still fail to see what is celebratory about a ‘partnership’ with one of the largest weapons traders on the planet.  The corporation is so big that it is the equivalent almost, of a private second government. The average household in America has what he calls a ‘Lockheed Martin tax’. The sum of around $260 is taken from all pockets to pay this company basically to spy on Americans through the NSA & CIA, even tracking packages in the US postal. As well as all this of course they make ballistic missiles among other weaponry to sell to foreign governments.  Read more on that here.

Rangitikei Environmental Health Watch

Rocket_Lab_Launch_Complex_1_(Sept_2016) The new rocket launch-pad at Mahia NZ …  Photo Credit: Wikipedia

Rocket Lab is an American aerospace corporation launching out of New Zealand
SOURCE

Did you know that NZ now has a rocket base? This news seems to have flown under the radar for many. I only noticed it myself a month or so ago. The base is actually situated in Mahia on the East Coast of the North Island, however it was originally planned for the South Island at Kaitorete Spit near Christchurch, also near Birdling Flat and the Radar/Haarp Station there (more on NZ Haarp here and here). The length of time obtaining consents appears to have been the deciding factor about a change in tack.  Rocket Lab noted one thing that prevented it from launching close to Christchurch which was the need for a cultural impact assessment from the council. A decision was made to locate…

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