Category Archives: HDC

At least $2.6 million ratepayer funds being spent because Horowhenua DC refuses to determine mana whenua

By Veronica Harrod

18 September, 2020

At least $2.6 million ratepayer funds being spent because Council refuses to determine mana whenua. Horowhenua District Council has committed at least $1.4 million ratepayer funding to Te Rūnanga o Raukawa and $814,500 to Muaūpoko Tribal Authority and the Muaūpoko Lands Trust in two separate agreements over Levin’s Waste Water Treatment Plant called The Pot. The agreements, worth a combined minimum total of $2.6 million, were signed by all parties prior to a decision by Manawatu Whanganui Regional Council hearing commissioners on June 2, 2020 to grant the Council a 25 year resource consent to continue storing and discharging treated waste water to The Pot, situated on ecologically and culturally important sand dunes about 4 kilometres west of Levin. In both agreements the Council says it, “takes no position in relation to who holds mana whenua, customary interests and rights, and/or rights of iwi/hapu over any area.” An Environment Ministry document titled ‘Guidelines for Consulting with Tangata Whenua under the Resource Management Act: An Update on Case Law’ states that although determining who holds mana whenua “can be a controversial issue” that “reasonable steps must be taken to identify the correct tangata whenua group. “It is the third agreement Council’s chief executive David Clapperton has signed with Te Rūnanga o Raukawa without the matter being discussed around the Council table – and the second known agreement signed by Larry Parr who is listed on Council’s webpage as chief executive officer for Te Rūnanga o Raukawa. Mr Clapperton also signed lucrative financial agreements with Te Rūnanga o Raukawa over Foxton’s Waste Water Treatment Plant and the Levin Landfill. The latest agreement was signed on behalf of Ngati Raukawa hapu including, “Ngati Kikopiri (Ngati Huia), Ngati Hikitanga and Ngati Pareraukawa. ”Ngati Raukawa hapu parties to the agreement include Pataka Moore, David Moore, Rachael Selby, Ngatokowaru Marae Committee and Ngati Kikopiri Mori Marae Committee Society in association with the Kikopiri Marae Reservation Trustees. Te Rūnanga o Raukawa, Muaūpoko Tribal Authority and Muaūpoko Lands Trust all agreed to:

1 Inform the regional council within 24 hours of signing the agreement, signed by Te Rūnanga o Raukawa on 5 March and MuaUpoko Tribal Authority on 16 April, “that their position on the Resource Consents have changed and they no longer oppose a 25-year term.”

2 Inform hearing commissioners deciding The Pot application the agreement entered into with the Council responds to, “their concerns, in particular kaitiakitanga, whanaungatanga, manaakitanga and rangatiratanga.”

3 Support the Council in, “any further matters before the hearing commissioners or any appeals” including appeals by the Council if The Pot consent was refused or conditions were imposed which limited or negated the agreement.

4 “Not participate in any way (including supporting any other party) in any process relating to the resource consents being granted, including before the hearing commissioners.”

5 “Not take or be involved in any other proceedings against” the Council or “make complaints against” the Council, “in relation to the discharges at The Pot.”

6 Assist the Council, “to talk with other submitters to try and resolve issues before the hearing commissioners or on any appeal in a manner that achieves the outcomes of this Agreement.”

7 “Work together to identify, assess and, if appropriate, assist consenting potential new areas for irrigation of treated wastewater from the LWWTP on the ‘Tucker Block’ land adjacent to The Pot” owned by the Council.The Council also committed to work with MTA to negotiate and sign a Memorandum of Partnership, “as soon as reasonably practicable, but no later than 3 months from the commencement of this Agreement.”

Horowhenua DC’s apparent conflicts of interest

Horowhenua investigative journalist Veronica Harrod has been looking at apparent conflicts of interest within the Horowhenua District Council. At this link (from the website of the Office of the Auditor General) you will see the clear rules and guidelines around declaring conflicts of interest when representing your local Council. In brief:

“Under the Act, you cannot:

  • enter into contracts with your local authority worth more than $25,000 in a financial year; or
  • discuss or vote on matters before your authority in which you have a direct or indirect pecuniary interest, other than an interest in common with the public.”

READ MORE AT THE LINK.

Read Veronica’s article posted at her Facebook page:

15 January, 2020

New Levin Ward councillor Todd Isaacs already has a conflict of interest

Two councillors have a major financial stake in commercial property earmarked in the Levin Town Centre Strategy for development by Horowhenua District Council.

Fourth term councillor Wayne Bishop and new Levin Ward councillor Todd Isaacs are both directors and shareholders of property investment company Write Properties Ltd.

The 3032 square property, on the corner of Oxford Street and Queen Street West, purchased by Write Properties Ltd on 28 November 2014, is within an area referred to as, “a key east-west movement corridor” and “a new consolidated east-west town core” in the strategy adopted by the previous Council in November 2018.

Purchased for $900,000 five years ago the property now has a rateable value of $2.08 million.

Despite several references in the Levin Town Centre Strategy to developing new activities on the west side of town, where the property is, the Council minutes show that Cr Bishop did not declare a financial conflict of interest or remove himself from discussing or voting in favour of the Levin town strategy.

Office of the Auditor General advice says, “The Local Authorities (Members’ Interest) Act helps protect the integrity of local authority decision-making by ensuring that people are not affected by personal motives when they participate in local authority decision-making.”

New Levin Ward councillor Todd Isaacs said he didn’t tell voters in the October 2019 local body elections he has a financial interest in a major property earmarked for development by the Council because he, “didn’t have to.”

Whether the owners of the Queen Street West property will benefit from, “Opportunities for new activities and businesses to cluster around a transport hub located in the centre of town”, or whether the intention is to develop the Queen Street West site as the Horowhenua Integrated Transport Hub is not known at this stage.

Write Properties Ltd also owns a 1013 m2 property in the industrial sector of Levin at 33 Hokio Beach Road valued at $335,000 in 2016.

The other three shareholders of Write Properties Ltd are Corey Kennett, Justin Rangi and Callum Dunsmore.

New Horowhenua mayor Bernie Wanden also has a financial conflict of interest because he owns a business in Levin’s town centre, with his wife Sharon Wanden, that is built on land the Council sold to mayor Wanden’s wife, mother-in-law and sister-in-law for a firesale price in a controversial sale one month before the local body elections last year.

The land had a rateable value of $295,000 when it was sold to mayor Wanden’s wife and her relations for $230,000.

This represents a 28 percent discount. At the time of the sale the public were told by the Council the discount was only 15 percent.

The Council is contracting the Horowhenua New Zealand Trust to undertake all the extensive – and yet to be funded – land and property development projects included in the Levin Town Centre Strategy and the Horowhenua Growth Strategy 2040.

todd isaacs

Photo of Queen Street West property in Levin Town Centre Strategy

INFO FOR COUNCILORS: https://oag.govt.nz/good-practice/conflicts-of-interest/for-councillors?fbclid=IwAR0uX9hr-YFVUJZ0oAu3vKvlZwwIlS047AzBCz9Vj1R72H49Cfbxba5-A4o

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21 January

New Levin Ward councillor Todd Isaacs is refusing to provide evidence he had election campaign flyers printed by Levin digital printer The Old Foundry.

Cr Isaacs stated on his signed Return of Electoral Donations and Expenses form that he paid $1174.73 to The Old Foundry for flyers and signs.

But when Horowhenua district councillor Isaacs was asked to produce a copy of the flyer he said he didn’t have any because, “I only did 2000 and they were all delivered.”

He did not respond to a request for information about where his flyers were delivered.

The final election results published by the electoral officer Warwick Lampp
on 16 October said Cr Isaacs received 1718 votes.

Local Levin man Ian Tate was appointed deputy electoral officer but the 60 year old, who had worked for the Council in a variety of roles for almost 30 years, died suddenly at home on 28 August.

Despite the Local Electoral Act 2001 stating candidates “must” take all reasonable steps to keep records of all candidate election expenses, Cr Isaacs has remained silent to a request for any evidence he had the campaign material printed.

The Act also says candidates, “must keep invoices and receipts for all election expenses of $50 or more for three years after returns are filed.”

When The Old Foundry owner Rex Vizible was phoned to confirm Cr Isaacs had spent “$1700 odd dollars for flyers and signs for Cr Isaacs” he said, “Yep, I can” even though Cr Isaacs had spent $1174 and not $1700.

Mr Vizible, also known as music producer Brett Stephen Taylor, was convicted and jailed for sexually assaulting a 29 year old male friend in an alcohol fuelled attack on 18 July, 2006.

The victim was quoted in a Stuff news article saying, “People really do need to know who this guy is…for the safety of the community as well.”

Deputy mayor Jo Mason also paid Mr Vizible’s business $1451.42 for campaign material.

Ratepayer funds have also been paid to Mr Vizible’s business by the Council and Foxton Community Board for The Foxton Godwits installation.

The Old Foundry website also includes glowing testimonials from Canvasland Ltd, Crowe Construction and Associates Ltd, the internationally known Swazi Apparel and Cr Piri-Hira Tukapua.

But Cr Piri-Hira Tukapua did not avail herself of Mr Vizible’s services at the last election.

Since enquiries for this news story began The Old Foundry has been busy deleting information from its website on 20 and 21 January including removing the names of other recommendations from real estate agent PGA Wrightson and Repco.

A photo of a large banner advertising The Old Foundry in Levin was also removed.

The advertising banner was erected above the 3032 square property, on the corner of Oxford Street and Queen Street West, owned by Write Properties Ltd.

Cr Isaacs and Cr Wayne Bishop are directors and shareholders of Write Properties Ltd.

 

The Horowhenua DC is seeking a 35 yr resource consent to continue discharging all of Levin’s treated waste water and other contaminants onto ecologically and culturally important coastal sand dunes

Surprized at this headline? It was discovered in 2018 that HDC’s CE David Clapperton had made a secret pay out of close to a million dollars to a local iwi on the proviso they withdrew their objection to another consent to do with discharge of treated waste water. If you check out our LG Watch pages (main menu) and Horowhenua you will read further interesting detail about pollution and the HDC. See this article in particular at this link (info from a former HDC councilor).

The article below here is from investigative journalist Veronica Harrod who has been shining a spotlight on many anomalies in the Horowhenua. EWR

The Pot thickens

3 February 2020

Horowhenua District Council is seeking a 35 year resource consent to continue discharging all of Levin’s treated waste water and other contaminants onto ecologically and culturally important coastal sand dunes four kilometres west of Levin.

In its application to regional council Manawatu Whanganui Regional Council the local council admits it didn’t do any, “direct consultation on the consent (and resulting effects of the activity)” during consultations on the Council’s 2018-2038 Long Term Plan.

The long term plan states, “For the first time, Council has created a 20 year Long Term Plan. We did this because our population is growing faster than it has for nearly a quarter of a century and this growth is expected to continue for the next 20 years.”

To accommodate, “future population and business growth” the Council wants to add another 20 hectares to the 40.5 hectares of The Pot that has been receiving treated waste water and other contaminants for the last 27 years.

The Pot is 110 hectares in total. Treated waste water and other contaminants are contained in a 7 hectare unlined “pond” prior to being sprayed over land.

Although stating, “It is envisaged that other properties can follow a similar procedure to receive wastewater for irrigation” in a discussion on alternative sites the Council admits it is already “a challenge” to obtain resource consents for irrigation to “other properties” during the summer months.

The Council’s applications also states, “The quality of the treated wastewater is well suited to land discharges and the land discharges are not causing more than minor adverse effects, so there is no driver for” upgrades at this stage.

However the Council’s Horowhenua Growth Strategy 2040, “assumes that Levin will be a key focus area of growth in the future”, and over 570 hectares has been identified for housing.

On 17 August 2018 the Council announced in a press release that a Master Plan for 278 hectares was being created for a 2000 house sub-division east of Levin called Gladstone Green.

“Built over 20 years, it will eventually be home to 5000 people,” the Council press release said.

But the 2000 housing sub-division has become a 2500 housing sub-division in less than five months after mayor Bernie Wanden said the Government’s recently announced construction of the Otaki to North Levin expressway provided certainty for, “a proposal for 2500 homes in south east Levin.”

“We can expect more families to move here in search of a fantastic lifestyle,” he said.

Also, changes to the District Plan in September 2018 mean residential properties in Levin between 500 and 900 square metres can now be sub-divided to a minimum size of 250 square metres.

The New Zealand Coastal Policy Statement 2010 policy on discharge of contaminants states: “Do not allow [the] discharge of treated human sewage to water in the coastal environment unless there has been adequate consideration of alternative methods, sites and routes for undertaking the discharge.”

The Council states its application, “relies on two discharge consents to operate which were granted by HRC [the regional council] in 1998.”

Next: What the community says in response to the Council’s resource consent application.

 

 

More revelations on NZ’s corporate LG model that’s controlling the democracy of your local councils … from the stonewalled outgoing Mayor of Horowhenua

After a very unfriendly ‘farewell’ if you could call it that, Horowhenua’s former Mayor, Michael Feyen, speaks out about what is really happening inside your local councils.

RELATED:
THE MAYOR WHO HAS HAD TO RUN HIS OWN MEDIA CAMPAIGN SHARES SOME INSIGHTS INTO THE CURRENT STATE OF LG IN NZ

Stonewalled from the outset, this Mayor, also a former councilor who blew the whistle on among other things pollution, and (now coming out for example, & curiously right after elections the issue of the cracks in the new HDC building that HDC declined to have examined at no cost). Add to that monitored & intercepted emails, a secret $1mill  payout to one of the local Iwi, and exclusion from the pensioner housing sale planning committee.  As many of us are aware democracy is fading into oblivion in NZ & we have the mere illusion only of the former status quo. This is a must listen on the machinations of both LGNZ (& govt?) from an insider. There will be more to come. See our LG Watch pages & search HDC in ‘categories’ for Horowhenua articles. EWR

The outgoing Mayor of Horowhenua was given a surprising ‘farewell’ this week

So Horowhenua’s outgoing Mayor was given a short shift from his office before he even arrived back on Monday, post elections. Bear in mind he would not officially finish employment as Mayor until the following Friday (18th Oct 2019). All of his office contents were packed into boxes & left outside his office door. A continuation merely of the stonewalling treatment he had from day one into his term. In my opinion, a clear message to all whistle blowers. It took 3 weeks for him to be able to enter his office back in 2016 when elected, and just hours to be sent off, as you can hear in the video, with a rude farewell that is quite frankly unbelievably ignorant. These are the people leading your district Horowhenuans. Unelected CEs NZ wide on obscenely high salaries that indicate the power they hold, have a fascist like control of your councils people. They are meeting behind closed doors and enabling the sell of of your (once) publicly owned assets. Things changed back in 2002. Do peruse our LG Watch pages at the main menu for other goings on around the country. For Horowhenua search for ‘HDC’ in ‘categories’ at left of the page. EWR

“SHARE:). Still Mayor to Friday. Went to sort out my office with both personal and HDC documents. Everything had already been boxed and was outside my door. Going through my stuff is disgusting. Looking forward to a place of positivity. Regards”

Just 17 months in and Willis & Bond property developers have raised the rents on the former Horowhenua DC pensioner flats

PLEASE NOTE, THIS POST WAS REMOVED FROM FACEBOOK BECAUSE IT VIOLATES COMMUNITY STANDARDS, I KID YOU NOT. EWR.

Willis & Bond with front company Compassion Housing raised tenants’ rents in July 2019 by $15 per week. These are the flats that were all but gifted to the property developers Willis &Bond, a sale that so many Horowhenua people vigorously opposed. At the time of the sale at a fire sale price the public were told the then current contracts with tenants would remain the same. Those were set to end however within 12 years.

news article wills and bond.png

Other changes introduced since the takeover have been the banning of cats for pensioners. Once pets that tenants currently own die, they are not allowed to obtain another. Since pets for the elderly are known to be very therapeutic. one is left wondering, what ever are Willis & Bond thinking?

Here in NZ we have entered a new era in terms of housing. We currently have 43K+ homeless and climbing, they are building hospices for the aged (hospices used to be for the terminally ill), your corporation that parades as a government is pondering on euthanasia, our state homes continue to disappear from availability as we speak (land banked, simply bulldozed as tenants tell me, or are sold to property developers) & Labour’s promise to replace them has been kicked a bit further down the road. Neo-lib economics. Profits are more important than people. Our forbears who worked hard to ensure all Kiwis were housed & fed would turn in their graves if they could see what is happening now.

Note: this situation in no way reflects on the staff of Compassion Housing or their quality of service as housing providers. They are doing their job as employees of the company they work for. However, when put up for sale by HDC it was promised the flats would go to a housing provider. They did not keep their promise, the flats were all but gifted to a property developer & many of us were not duped by the partnership that ensued.

EWR

 

The Mayor who has had to run his own media campaign shares some insights into the current state of LG in NZ

These videos are from the Mayor of Horowhenua, Michael Feyen. This is a ‘people’s Mayor’ who, like his former deputy Cr Ross Campbell, seems as much at home digging a haangi or drying dishes as he is wearing his mayoral chains. Just into his first term as Mayor however he had most of the councilors go public with a statement saying they supported not him but the CEO. For background to this situation read this article.  His selected Deputy Mayor was unseated just hours into his term for speaking on social media about what looked like insider trading (and that hasn’t gone away, see Ross Campbell’s recent updates). This is all not surprising in light of the fact that these two have blown the whistle on quite a lot of things they saw as ‘not right’ in the course of their work in Council. Council pollution was another issue they highlighted. And so come this campaign the Mayor has had next to no coverage by media. Stone walled & neutered as he puts it himself, he has had a difficult uphill battle with a council that seems more intent on the business of property development than the interests both he & his former deputy would have liked to focus on. A keen supporter of retaining the Horowhenua community housing for instance, Mayor Feyen was removed from the housing committee because he had a conflict of interest! (ie he wanted to retain the housing … he had seen among other things opportunities for employment therein for the young people of the town, the same as his aspirations to pursue trapping of pests in lieu of the use of 1080 poison and of investing in the hemp growing industry). The list goes on, not a list shared largely by his colleagues. The housing sold for a song incidentally, to a property developer who then partnered with an established housing provider with promises to maintain the then status quo, however the contract ends in 2029 or thereabouts & just 18 months in they rents have already been raised.

“Effective growth is a partnership between council, central government and private enterprise….away from the unsettling glare of public commentary…” explains one HDC councilor regarding all of the public excluded meetings by which the assets are being sold. (See this article also). Developers are also exempt from paying development contributions to Council. And nowhere else in the country besides Horowhenua does a District Council have a CE and a Deputy Mayor who are both registered property developers.

Listen further to the Mayor’s latest update, expanding further on LG in NZ:

A highlighted issue with this election has been the difficulty involved in voting (see Veronica Harrod’s info). This was the same last election when many folk did not receive their voting papers and the voting info office was frequently either unmanned or closed. Curious isn’t it?

So amidst the LG so called ‘sustainable’ councils up and down our clean green land (not) we have a raft of property developers busy with their public private partnerships selling up all of the public assets for a song. Then there has been the ongoing escalating debts of Councils. That has been an issue in the Horowhenua as well … it’s ‘good debt’ we’re frequently told. Currently, right on election time, the Horowhenua CE is away on holiday and has been for several weeks. This is the CE who was intercepting the emails of his staff for ‘safety reasons’ it was touted. Who paid a secret payment to a local iwi without the Mayor’s knowledge. Mayor Feyen is himself a staunch supporter of true partnership with Tangata Whenua & honouring the principles of the Treaty. Currently the Council’s real commitment appears to be mainly lipservice. 

 

Please have a listen to his videos anyway & peruse the info on our Local Government Watch Horowhenua page. That has not been updated of late unfortunately, there is much more than is documented there. For more recent & all info see HDC in ‘categories. See also Cr Ross Campbell’s page on FB, the Mayor’s page (Michael Feyen) and Veronica Harrod’s also. Veronica is an investigative journalist who has researched quite extensively the activities of this Council.

EWR

 

 

 

 

The public have seen little accountability from the Horowhenua NZ Trust formed last year

From Veronica Harrod

Last month Horowhenua deputy mayor Wayne Bishop’s land and property development company was sold 2.7 hectares next to land earmarked for transfer to the Horowhenua New Zealand Trust.

On 2 November Wayne Bishop Investment Ltd purchased half a hectare of a former industrial site at 56-62 Cambridge Street South for $480,000 and 2.7 hectares of land behind it for $360,000. It is the first time the 2.7 hectare block has been sold.

The 2.7 hectare of land now owned by Cr Bishop’s company is directly beside 7.6 hectares of public land owned by Horowhenua District Council at 72 Cambridge Street South earmarked for sale in Council’s November 2015 Property Strategy.

Last year Council voted to establish what it referred to as an “economic development trust” called the Horowhenua New Zealand Trust (HNZT) and transfer up to 40 percent of public assets to the trust as “seed capital” which includes the 72 Cambridge Street South site.

The Cambridge Street acquisitions are in close proximity to three other land purchases by Cr Bishop’s land and property development company in Hinemoa and Liverpool Street totalling almost 12 hectares of prime real estate.

Almost one hectare in Hinemoa Street has a rateable value of just $165,000 but a Capital Value of $1.2 million.

The valuation of Cr Bishop’s Speldhurst development, being built in stages on the 48 hectare former Kimberley Hospital site, increased by 430 percent in 2016 from $3.8 million to $20.3 million. The site is still listed as “leasehold land” on Quotable Values database, “meaning someone else has a freehold interest in the property.”

Cr Bishop was deputy chair of the Economic Development Board (EDB) and six former board members are now all trustees of the HNZT.

Since six members of the EDB were named as trustees Council has removed all references to the EDB from its website although there has been no formal announcement the board has been dis-established.

On 18 October 2018, five months after HNZT was registered, a financial services company called The Horowhenua Company was established naming all but one trustee of HNZT as shareholders.

Former EDB chair and trustee of HNZT Cameron Lewis is a director and a shareholder of The Horowhenua Company.

The other shareholders include former EDB members and trustees of HNZT Antony Young, Evan Kroll, Larry Ellison and Ron Turk.

The majority of councillors voted in support of Council’s chief executive officer David Clapperton assisting the trust but voted against Mayor Michael Feyen being involved.

The author further comments:

The public have not been provided with any information since the Horowhenua New Zealand Trust was registered on 31 May. Has land already been sold or transferred to the trust? Council’s chief executive David Clapperton has made conflicting statements. He initially said the public would be consulted. But then he released information that stated the public did not have to be consulted on the sale of $28 million property because it was “non-core” property; not significant or “core” property. Has 72 Cambridge Street South already been transferred to the trust? What other property has been transferred? A Stuff article of 28 June [five months ago] states “the first group of properties are expected to be transferred in the next few months.” The public were assured the trust structure included accountability however the public have seen little of that. Instead it appears the public know little to nothing that is apparently being done on the community’s behalf as a charitable trust.

People must now seek permission to film Horowhenua DC’s PUBLIC meetings – what’s to hide?

You can watch the discussion around this here at the publicly streamed HDC meeting. It will be up for some months but not forever (See other links in the POST SCRIPT at the end of the article). From hereon in anyway, if you wish to film HDC’s public meeting you must seek permission first. It’s about protecting staff, same as the rationale for vetting staff emails. Staff safety. Unless your name is Cr Ross Campbell that is.

Since Mayor Feyen was elected we’ve had live streaming of Council meetings, initially to FB also however with what appears to be a growing trend in censorship & control at the Horowhenua LG level (the intercepted emails, the stonewalling of the people’s mayor, the refusal to open the books, the shut down of a local land owner’s water supply … I could go on) the FB streaming’s been stopped. You can listen to the discussion around that at the HDC website. (Good luck on finding it, it was the meeting prior to 10/10). The available stream at HDC’s site appears to be edited by the simple fact it switches view periodically & frequently what is being said cannot be heard or cuts off midstream.

A local person who spoke in the public speaking time, outlined that he has been filming meetings for 8-9 years with never a problem. Independent filming meant there was always an independent & true record of the proceedings available should any other system fail.

Apparently at the tea break of the said meeting on 10/10/18, he requested permission to film and was denied. No time wasted in putting the said tweaks to operations into action.

This all also takes place around the event of the aforementioned Cr Campbell fearing for his safety & announcing at the last meeting that he had sought Police advice & from thereon in would be carrying a pen size camera to use if any threatening behaviour should recur. That of course went down like a lead balloon. Going by the responses, few were bothered for his safety, rather he was ridiculed for his precautionary measures. If you take time to listen to the meeting you will hear the many comments around that (hopefully).

In case you didn’t know Cr Campbell was assaulted in 2004 so he has every right to be taking precautionary measures. You can read about that event here. (At the link be sure to read the related articles as another assault allegedly relating to Council issues occurred in 2016).

Likewise, former Cr and Mayoral candidate Mrs Anne Hunt who also spoke on 10/10/18, told of how she had received death threats as a Mayoral candidate. You should hear that on the stream (hopefully). She spoke similarly the day Cr Campbell was unseated which media completely ignored. These threats are clearly not something to be ridiculed. And yet your elected councilors (well some of them anyway) seem little bothered about them.

So people, if you want to hear the public meetings & see for yourself the bad schoolboy-like behaviour of some of the councilors, you’ll need to be there in person. Streaming will continue but I personally wouldn’t be too reliant on its being the full uncut version you’ll see somehow. In my opinion anyway.

Finally, it’s not that easy to find & access the public stream on HDC’s website. It’s what folk have been complaining about since it left FB. I’ve just looked & can’t find it so had to return to the link placed on HDC’s FB page. Too bad if you’re not on FB. You could phone HDC for directions.

POST SCRIPT:

Mayor Feyen has just posted this link for the streaming, keep the link for future reference: http://www.ustream.tv/channel/7dRfxBRYt8m

Here also is a link for Part 2 of the HDC Council meeting involving restrictions on filming these public meetings.  http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/117579383

The ongoing censorship of Horowhenua’s Mayor – whatever happened to democracy & free speech in NZ?

“My messages as Mayor … are very very seldom what I write … they’re always doctored to be worded differently. I like to give out some news and I usually go for all of the positive stuff, but this one really irks me… the last one, I didn’t even write any of it in the last Community Connection, and this one here has got the Deputy Mayor’s name & as I said, I wanted … in my one … I wanted to put in the Maori Apellate Court judgement which relates to Lake Horowhenua Trust …”

LISTEN FURTHER:

If you are new to the goings on at Horowhenua District Council go to this link for our coverage. You could also search Veronica Harrod’s articles by using the search box in the right hand column of the News page or go to her public Facebook page. Veronica has provided excellent coverage on topic. (Our LG Govt Watch pages are in need of an update however there is important info there on the history nevertheless).

A small window of insight that mainstream media predictably has never mentioned is the public statement made by a former councilor Mrs Anne Hunt who divulged at the first Council meeting after the last LG elections (when Mayor Feyen’s choice of DM Cr Ross Campbell was unseated)  that when she stood for Mayor in 2010 she was warned if she won ‘they’ would make her life hell. Media as I say, ignored this disturbing revelation, as did all those present that day. Nobody even challenged it as being untrue. You can read about that at this link. You will also see there Mayor Feyen’s revelations at that meeting, which mainstream also ignored:

“.… we simply weren’t accorded any democratic rights in the last three years. We had our access keys taken from us, we were dumped off committees with no explanation, people saw us constantly having derogatory comments  thrown at us by the past mayor, we were always interrupted when we asked questions, when we asked questions in writing we seldom got an answer.

Certainly disturbing how mainstream in my opinion slants their reporting in favour of the majority there. And if you’ve been to any of HDC’s public meetings you will have noted that there is frequently only one other person in favour of the new Mayor’s initiatives. That is the unseated DM Cr Campbell. Subsequently a Mayor with the majority of public votes is not supported by a majority of Councilors. As was stated at the outset, the law is an ass. (In this case LG law if you will).

 

Horowhenua DC does not deem it necessary to consult the public on the sale of Levin’s Focal Point Cinema

From Veronica Harrod

Focal Point Cinema to be sold to Horowhenua New Zealand Trust?

Horowhenua residents were told they would be consulted before public assets were sold or transferred to Horowhenua New Zealand Trust but that now looks unlikely.

The Horowhenua New Zealand Trust (HNZT) – a charitable trust – will take over responsibility for economic development from the Economic Development Board and plans to be involved in a number of projects including land and property development of public assets transferred or sold to the Trust as seed capital.

On 8 November last year chief executive David Clapperton said in a Council press release, “We will soon consult with the community about what property Council should retain. We also need to make sure the community understands that managing this property could include selling it if that is in the best interests of the community.”

Now he says, “The sale or assignment of property assets will not be…requiring community consultation unless the asset in question is deemed a strategic asset, involves an activity that will significantly affect capacity or cost to Council, or is a change to the Long Term Plan.”

“An asset, such as Focal Point Cinema, would not be deemed significant and would therefore not be consulted on should there be a proposal to sell or assign this building,” he said.

However, Council’s significance and engagement policy also states, “Matters…may have a high degree of significance where it is known that the decision will nevertheless generate a high degree of controversy. Council will make judgements on the level of support for those views when determining the significance of a decision.”

Furthermore no consultation will be required for the sale or transfer of 14 public assets in Levin and surrounding area, Foxton, Foxton Beach, Shannon and Depot House on Hokio Beach Road because Council voted to sell them in 2009 at a 5 August Council meeting.

Council’s property strategy states Council assets include 550 properties with a total rateable value, including land and buildings, of approximately $101 million as at 2014 including $28 million of non-core properties.

The strategy also states, “It is also important to understand that a classification of non-core does not automatically mean that the relevant property/facility should or can be disposed of as a range of other factors come into play.”

Non-core property includes commercial buildings and land, endowment property, forestry, motor camps, rental houses, rural leases and a “subdivision” category.

Under the Local Government Act if, “an asset has been unlawfully sold or otherwise disposed of by the local authority; or a liability has been unlawfully incurred by the local authority” the Auditor General may make recommendations to recover the loss or prevent further losses.

Where in the modern world can a local council turn off somebody’s water supply for 660 days? Only in the Horowhenua

This is the stuff of the third world right? Here in ‘yeah right’ clean green NZ (next to one of the worst polluted/trashed lakes in NZ) …  a NZ land owner, mana whenua I believe, is denied access to the town supply water. The council simply turned it off. The lake by the way, trashed by the local council since practically forever. See the other articles here on how the council historically has treated Mr Taueki. Shame. You could be forgiven for thinking the authorities were trying to run him off his own land.

For more info on HDC’s history on pollution see our Local Govt Watch pages … hear from whistle blowers and read Dr Russell Norman’s comment that  … “HDC had a history of resource consent breaches”.

The following video was posted at FB this week by Horowhenua’s Mayor who needless to say is not in agreement with the shutting off of this man’s water supply:

“SHARE …  I totally oppose any system that allows council to disconnect anyone’s water supply to their residence. It is a breach of human rights at the very least. Try going without running water for 640 days and you cannot bathe in the Lake either. I trust the powers that be get onto this asap in the appropriate manner. Regards” [Mayor Feyen]

RELATED

https://envirowatchrangitikei.wordpress.com/2017/12/09/shot-at-assaulted-arrested-thrown-in-jail-drugged-car-destroyed-home-sledgehammered-something-is-very-wrong-with-nzs-justice-system-a-must-read-book-review/

Debt levels at Horowhenua District Council have spiralled to $99million

And they are nit picking over Mayor Feyen helping the local Brass Band pay their insurance among other worthy causes with nary a mention of the Raukawa payout aka bribe to allow them to spray human sewage over all of those pesky wahi tapu paying lip service to their Treaty partnership. And let’s not forget the gift of $1.86 mill to Willis & Bond property developers who purchased the pensioner housing at a fire sale price.

By Veronica Harrod

Debt levels at Horowhenua District Council have spiraled to $99million.

A Quarterly Treasury report by Council’s treasury advisors – Bancorp Treasury Services Limited – said, “As of Thursday 26 July, HDC has now got $99m in debt.”

The quarterly report also said Council’s net debt prediction in the Long Term Plan of $81 million by year end is based on the assumption of property sales of $7 million, new and improved asset purchases of $22 million and cash of $11 million by the end of 2018.

Also included in the Finance, Audit and Risk sub-committee agenda of 1 August was Council’s draft 12 month financial report to June 2018 which shows council spent $827,000 of a projected $956,000 budget on economic development projects that are not publicly detailed.

The draft 12 month report also serves as a stark reminder Council spends almost three times more on ‘economic development’ than ‘community development’ which had a forecasted budget of $361,000 compared with actual budget of $348,000.

SOURCE

Horowhenua’s Mayor Feyen sets the record straight on the Mayoral fund

The Mayoral fund expenditure has been called into question by the Horowhenua District Council. Here, Mayor Feyen sets the record straight on the points in question.

Mayor Feyen unseated former mayor, Brendan Duffy in the last election, campaigning on care, vision & open communication in HDC’s leadership, retaining the pensioner housing (now sold), affordable rates, reducing debt, staying within budget & clean water among other things. Unfortunately his vision is not shared by many of his colleagues. Thereby he has had a tough time of it as anybody who attends Council meetings or watches the live stream will witness to.

Please see our Local Govt Watch pages Horowhenua for info on all of that.

 

The Foxton Memorial Hall is set to be sold by the Horowhenua Council – locals are not happy

As is the growing case in many places now, Councils are selling off via public private partnerships, the public assets of their communities. Folk are not too happy about this one. Cr Campbell from Shannon is in the throes of trying to retain their memorial hall also, see his comments below to this topic:

“I think a Local Peoples Trust to manage the Foxton Hall could well solve the issue as they would be able to apply for grants to remedy the problems which I believe total about $270 000 approximately.
I have been busy securing our hall (Shannon) from sale but I do believe a partition seeking a stay on the sale of this important Building is worth the effort.
I can assure you both the Mayor and myself do not want this Hall sold or transferred to the “Horowhenua Trust” for sale.

If Foxton folk wish to retain theirs they will need to band together & utilize a similar plan.

The sale of your public assets by council … “away from the glare of public commentary”

THIS TELLS THE WHOLE STORY. The Master Plan was the brainchild of the council’s economic development board according to a timeline in the Master Plan document. Former mayor Brendan Duffy and Mr Clapperton confirmed support for the Master Plan one day after the concept was presented to them by the board, and “In a councillor column in a community newspaper last year Councillor Neville Gimblett said the medical centre land deal…

“….reinforced that effective growth is a partnership between council, central government and private enterprise….away from the unsettling glare of public commentary..” …. Cr Gimblett, HDC

AWAY FROM THE GLARE OF PUBLIC COMMENTARY? … REALLY?


New medical centre for Levin first project of Horowhenua NZ Trust

One of the first projects the recently established Horowhenua New Zealand Trust hopes to project lead is a new medical centre on public land Horowhenua District Council sold to BOHR Property Ltd late last year.

Council’s chief executive David Clapperton and council’s economic development manager Shanon Grainger have both publicly stated the medical centre project will be led by the Horowhenua NZ Trust.

At the FCB meeting on 18 September 2017 Mr Clapperton said “the new purpose-built medical centre” was a Master Plan project which he described as, “the product of years of collective effort” …before going on to say, “it can be anticipated that further large scale projects like the medical centre will flow into our district.”

In his council report on supporting the establishment of the Horowhenua NZ Trust Mr Grainger said the Trust’s role up to July 2018 is to roll out Project Lift including, “a series of modern process-designed projects” which are part of the, “Master Plan: Quality Care and Lifestyle for Older People.”

Six former Horowhenua District Council economic development board members have now been named as trustees in a recently filed Trust Deed including Cameron Lewis, Antony Young, Andrew Wynn, Ron Turk, Evan Kroll and Larry Ellison.

Concerns have been raised by residents about whether the community will benefit from an extensive number of land and property development, construction and infrastructure projects the charitable trust intends to initiate throughout the district.

The public were excluded from participating in the council sale of the now demolished 100 year old historic Jack Allen House in Durham Street, Levin to BOHR Property Ltd for a new medical centre.

Due to the secrecy around the sale of the Jack Allen House there is concern about how transparent council will be about an intention to transfer up to 40 percent of public assets to the Trust as “seed” funding.

In a councillor column in a community newspaper last year Councillor Neville Gimblett said the medical centre land deal, “reinforced that effective growth is a partnership between council, central government and private enterprise….away from the unsettling glare of public commentary.”

According to Companies Office information Levin Chartered Accountant Hamid & McHutchon Ltd of Queen Street holds 116 of a total of 120 shares “on behalf” of other un-named shareholders of BOHR Property Ltd and Hamid & McHutchon Ltd is not the “ultimate holding company.”

The two directors of BOHR Property Ltd including Bente Ongkiehong and Johannes Roberti own two shares each worth 1.67 percent.

The Master Plan was the brainchild of the council’s economic development board according to a timeline in the Master Plan document. Former mayor Brendan Duffy and Mr Clapperton confirmed support for the Master Plan one day after the concept was presented to them by the board.

http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/AK1806/S00287/new-levin-medical-centre-first-horowhenua-nz-trust-project.htm

© Scoop Media

 

HDC is about to give millions in council assets to a new trust … to promote the economy we’re told

Last year we posted news that HDC were considering public private partnerships to dispose of council assets. They seem to think we all came down in the last shower. Here we have a CE saying “but it was not yet known how profits would be spent or invested… ” Seriously …  this is the person who we just heard paid local iwi secretly as per quote from Kapiti Independent News:

“Chief executive David Clapperton made the confidential agreement to provide at least $880,500 to Te Runanga o Raukawa on the proviso the Runanga withdraw its objection to council’s resource consent application to make discharges from the Foxton Waste Water Treatment Plant to Matakarapa Island”.

…& we’ve heard nary a whisper of that since it leaked out!… who also all but gifted $1.86 million of council assets (aka pensioner flats) to Willis & Bond property developers. (The auditor General’s fine with that we heard recently so I imagine it’s all go with the current giveaways as well). May as well say haere ra to this lot friends. The millions of dollars of assets I’m talking about, not the generous people who are giving them away. As we speak the community/memorial halls are up for grabs in Foxton & elsewhere. This looks distinctly like a land grab as eloquently described by the late Joan Veon who observed developments in the UN plans for so called ‘sustainable’ development that is clearly everything but sustainable … Public Private Partnerships ‘an arm of the world’s growing corporatocracy, the bottom line is to take control of the assets of government (links below). At the Agenda 21/30 pages (main menu, top of page) you can read NZer Dr Naomi Jacobs’ ebook on topic inspired by the rates hikes & property losses in Mangawhai.

Here is Stuff’s article:

Millions of dollars of council assets will be transferred into independent hands to help boost the Horowhenua economy.

The Horowhenua New Zealand Trust could be operating in the next month, chairman Cam Lewis said. It will own and manage property and assets given to it by the Horowhenua District Council, and promote the district as a place to do business.

The trust would benefit residents by increasing jobs in the district, but it was not yet known how profits would be spent or invested, he said.

Council staff said property to be transferred would only include “non-core properties”. The council owns almost $28 million in non-core property and more than $100m in assets.

READ MORE

https://www.stuff.co.nz/manawatu-standard/news/104864000/millions-in-council-assets-to-be-given-to-new-trust-to-promote-economy

LINKS TO OUR PREVIOUS ARTICLES:

https://envirowatchrangitikei.wordpress.com/2017/06/12/so-horowhenuas-community-housing-did-indeed-sell-for-a-song/

https://envirowatchrangitikei.wordpress.com/2017/05/29/why-did-a-property-developer-register-a-company-called-compassion-horowhenua-a-week-before-horowhenuas-community-housing-sold/

https://envirowatchrangitikei.wordpress.com/2017/12/03/horowhenua-council-considers-selling-off-large-amounts-of-council-property-by-way-of-public-private-partnerships/

http://kapitiindependentnews.net.nz/horowhenua-councils-secret-payout/#comment-718586

https://envirowatchrangitikei.wordpress.com/2017/12/02/public-private-partnerships-are-an-arm-of-the-worlds-growing-corporatocracy-their-bottom-line-is-to-take-control-of-the-assets-of-government-joan-veon/

https://envirowatchrangitikei.wordpress.com/2018/07/06/challenging-the-privatisation-and-divestment-of-public-land-assets-forced-upon-communities-against-their-will-re-takapuna-a-high-court-judicial-review-scheduled-for-august-on-8-grounds-re-the/

https://envirowatchrangitikei.wordpress.com/2016/12/11/the-horowhenua-dcs-economic-development-committee-that-looks-not-unlike-insider-trading/

To look at the wider picture, as per Joan Veon’s video if you watched it, see our Agenda 21/30 pages (NZ in particular) at the main menu. This is a global trend with global governance in mind.

The big taxpayer-funded pay rises: $50,000-plus boost for top public CEOs

Pardon my graphic description but here we have pigs at the trough again. A reminder of the corruption our country now labours under. I was raised in the era when renumeration was more in line with reality. The real workers are squeezed onto minimum minimum wage with loud squeals if they ask for more, taxed one third on second jobs, while these shrewd suited apologies for humanity wallow in obscene wealth. Who needs a million dollars pa to survive? And we have the usual lame lipservice justification … “How much we pay chief executives requires a careful balance between ensuring we can attract and retain highly qualified and skilled leaders while being prudent … when spending public money.”

Bollocks. Spending public money? Why the CE in Horowhenua Council recently gifted public assets to private developers Willis & Bond to the tune of $1.86 million. Prudence? Public money? Pleeeze.
EnvirowatchRangitikei

1509978_745670518844847_403082449805717955_n.jpg
A reminder of how neo lib economics favours the top echelon … we are fed the illusory lie that all can succeed under this system


The big taxpayer-funded pay rises: $50,000-plus boost for top public CEOs

The chief executives of Housing NZ, the Ministry of Education, Tourism NZ and the Accident Compensation Corporation were among those who reaped at least $50,000 more in pay and bonuses over the last year.

Figures released by the State Services Commission show ACC chief executive Scott Pickering was paid $760,000-$770,000, which is $150,000 more than the year before. Housing NZ Corporation CEO Glen Sowry received between $520,000 and $530,000 – at least $50,000 more than the year before. And Education chief executive Peter Hughes got at least $60,000 more than the year before with between $620,000 and $630,000.

READ MORE:

https://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=11551945

Public remain in the dark about plans by Horowhenua District Council to transfer up to 40 percent of public assets to the yet to be legally registered property trust called Horowhenua NZ Trust

More excellent investigative reporting from Veronica Harrod

Is it a bird, is it a plane, is it superman? No, it’s a giant wrecking ball and its coming near you soon.

The public remain in the dark about plans by Horowhenua District Council to transfer up to 40 percent of public assets to the recently established property investment trust called Horowhenua NZ Trust.

The only item on the 6 June agenda to be discussed in a publicly excluded part of the meeting refers to “Legal Matters: Settlement Options – Historic Dispute” which, if this refers to the transfer of public assets, appears to be deliberately worded to hide council’s intention.

Council will discuss and vote on this item in a publicly excluded part of the meeting on the grounds, “The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).”

One of the big problems residents have is how the commercial confidential clauses of the Local Government Act deny the public opportunities to be a part of discussions in the public interest. Also, the public don’t know how councillors vote on publicly excluded matters or whether councillors have undeclared conflicts of interest.

It is the only clause of the Local Government Act available to council’s, who may be motivated by self and vested interest rather than public interest, because it allows council’s to side-step obligations to be transparent and accountable.

But when council’s get into bed with land and property developers to the extent this council has then serious concerns about how the commercial confidentiality clause of the Local Government Act is being used are justified.

The most glaring example of this was the sale of the former council owned pensioner housing portfolio to one of the biggest land and property developers in the country Willis Bond for a firesale price of $5.2 million resulting in a loss of $1.86 million.

The Office of the Auditor General is making a determination on this matter and conflicts of interest but, to put it mildly, residents aren’t holding their breathe that an investigation of any real merit will be pursued.

In a report on supporting the establishment of the Horowhenua NZ Trust economic development manager Shanon Grainger stated, “The Trust operates through a Trust Deed in standard fashion. That Deed holds trustees to account, trustees operate under the standard legislation and case law applying to trustees. This is a high level of accountability with sanctions and remedies.”

But the public don’t know how the Trust will operate because the Trust has not been legally registered, there is no Trust deed to refer to and who the specific directors are still has not been announced.

Mr Grainger also said the Trust model was, “explicitly detached from local government so that local government politicians are not compromised, and investors are not compromised.”

Yet members of council’s in-house economic development board are Trust directors in the first instance and three councillors are on the board including deputy chair of the economic development board councillor Wayne Bishop who is also the deputy mayor.

Compounding concerns is the fact Cr Bishop has three land and property development companies, and an extensive and growing number of Horowhenua land and property development projects, and the Trust is being assisted by the council’s chief executive David Clapperton who established a company classified under the land development/subdivision category in November 2016.

These facts alone appear to contradict Mr Grainger’s comment the Trust is “explicitly detached from local government.”

Not only has the council publicly stated it intends on transferring up to 40 percent of assets to the Trust but an unknown amount of ratepayer funds that council spends on “economic development” will also be funnelled to the Trust.

The only public comment made about how much council spends on “economic development” was a vague statement made by Mr Clapperton the dollar amount was unknown because it is within the Representation and Community Leadership budget of $4.1 million annually!

Plans by the council and the yet-to-be legally registered Horowhenua NZ Trust move relentlessly forward even though the public are being consulted on a myriad of plans and strategies that, if adopted in their present form, will unleash an explosive number of land and development, demolition and construction projects across the district.

Clearly though this trend of council’s getting into bed with land and property developers is undergoing a 21st Century renaissance. Listen to what is happening at New Plymouth District Council: “The council wants to sell part of Peringa Reserve – including half of a public golf course – to housing developers for $35 million. Opponents say it is protected recreational space and should be kept. RNZ Taranaki reporter Robin Martin has more.

The New Plymouth district council has come under fire for describing a proposal to sell part of a coastal reserve as “land recycling”. The council wants to sell part of…
RADIONZ.CO.NZ
 
Note: As the additional link on New Plymouth shows, councils up & down the land are using the tried & true method of relieving you of your public assets your forbears worked to provide for succeeding generations. Public Private Partnerships. Listen to Joan Veon on that topic (see our Agenda 21/30 pages). Buying your assets for a song literally via the back door. This link  will take you to related examples of this in NZ including Joan Veon’s information. Let’s not forget these transfer of assets seem to be happening with no rhyme or reason as to their value, witness the transfer of Horowhenua’s pensioner flats to Willis & Bond property developers with front company Compassion Housing formed a week before the sale, at a loss of $1.86 million (ie sold that much below their true value, a right royal gift for W&B. Enjoy (if you can). EnvirowatchRangitikei

The Levin 1080 fire: Part 2 (Kapiti Independent)

A follow up-article from Kapiti Independent News on the 1080 fire in Levin. Part 1 is here.

We first reported on this event in Levin on Feb 22nd & again on March 8th. At the time it was being discussed on a Facebook 1080 forum, a man reported the health effects he had been experiencing. I did exchange words with him then, inquiring further of his experience however he stopped responding to my messages.   EnvirowatchRangitikei


By Mary Wood and Anne Hunt

Where a substantial amount of hazardous substances are stored, the Health and Safety at Work (Hazardous Substances) Regulations 2017 state that it is the responsibility of the person conducting a business or undertaking (PCBU), to ensure that a full risk assessment is carried out by Fire & Emergency NZ.

Outcomes from these risk assessments include ensuring that

  • crucial signage is erected around the storage areas
  • safe drainage facilities are available to prevent contamination of waterways.

In theory, these formalised procedures are overseen by the local District Health Board’s Chief Medical Officer, who, in the event of a fire or other emergency such as an earthquake, assess the risks to nearby residents and workers from any toxic smoke and fumes and if necessary, instigate the pre-arranged evacuation plan.

READ MORE

https://kapitiindependentnews.net.nz/1080-fire-part-2/

Horowhenua Council’s Secret Payout (Kapiti Independent)

From Kapiti Independent News

The Horowhenua Council’s Chief Executive confidentially agreed to provide nearly a million dollars to Te Runanga o Raukawa provided it did not object to a wastewater scheme.

Chief executive David Clapperton made the confidential agreement to provide at least $880,500 to Te Runanga o Raukawa on the proviso the Runanga withdraw its objection to council’s resource consent application to make discharges from the Foxton Waste Water Treatment Plant to Matakarapa Island.

A leaked copy of the September 2017 draft agreement states that Te Runanga o Raukawa (TRoR), “will withdraw their submissions to Horizons [regional council and] the Environment Court in respect of proceedings within 5 working days of TRoR signing this agreement.”

Obligations for Rununga

The agreement also states TRoR will, “not participate in any way (including supporting any other party) in the Foxton Waste Water Treatment Plant (FWWTP) proceedings before the Environment Court in respect of proceedings..or any other regulatory or statutory proceedings related to the current proposal for the discharge of treated human wastewater from FWWTP to land at Matakarapa…”

The agreement defines Matakarapa Island as approximately, “364.3 hectares of land to the south west of Foxton township comprising several parcels of land in ownership of several entities.”

Councillor Ross Campbell said he attended a breakfast signing event for the agreement at Foxton’s Returned Services Association (RSA) on 29 September 2017 where he was told the agreement had been signed by Larry Parr on behalf of TRoR  and Mr Clapperton behind closed doors.

Never debated by Councillors

“This is a huge sum of money distributed to a collective group for purposes which have not been disclosed to the public or debated by council for consideration,” he said.

Mr Clapperton has delegated authority to spend up to $1 million annually on specified contracts for services and Mr Parr was one of seven hapu who signed a March 6, 2018 letter supporting Mr Clapperton’s reappointment as council chief executive after his first five year term ended earlier this year.

The Office of the Auditor General confirmed the funding will be paid to TRoR under Mr Clapperton’s delegated authority in a letter to former councillor Anne Hunt which stated, “I also understand that the arrangements with Te Runanga o Raukawa were made with delegated authority by Mr Clapperton.”

‘Strict confidentiality’

The agreement has strict confidentiality clauses including, “Affected hapu members must keep confidential, and not disclose to any other person, or use for any other purpose the terms and conditions of the Matakarapa Agreement. The Parties may make public statements that agreement has been reached on a confidential basis.”

Horowhenua Mayor Michael Feyen

Mayor Michael Feyen said he has, “only seen an incomplete draft”, that he took, “no part in negotiations” and “did not sign it, as I would expect I would do as mayor.”

After Cr Ross tried to table a copy of the agreement at the November 22 council meeting last year several councillors, including deputy mayor Wayne Bishop, Crs Victoria Kaye-Simmons, Barry Judd, Neville Gimblett, Jo Mason and Christine Mitchell, walked out which meant the council meeting had to be cancelled due to lack of a quorum.

The minutes of the November 22 council meeting state, “This document has not been furnished to the Chief Executive and does not, therefore, form part of the official record of the meeting.”

The draft agreement also includes a clause that some of the funding can be used, “subject to HDC Councillor approval” with the word Councillor struck out, “to invest in the purchase of 28 Harbour Street, Foxton…if the purchase of 28 Harbour Street, Foxton…is not approved…TRoR (Rununga) may seek to utilise the funding..to invest in another suitable property agreed to by both Parties.”

SOURCE

http://kapitiindependentnews.net.nz/horowhenua-councils-secret-payout/#comment-718586

COUNCILOR ROSS CAMPBELL’S COMMENT AT SOURCE:

Thanks you to the Kapiti Independant News for bringing this Agreement between TE RUNANGA o RAUKAWA & HDC CE out into the Public view. As you seem to be aware I tried to make this “Agreement” Public at a Full Council meeting on the 22nov 2017. This Agreement had been left in an envelope in my Council letter Box by a concerned person I guess.
I was astonished at its contents, so I decided to table it at the Council meeting(22 Nov). When I endeavoured to do this I requested that our CE remove himself from the table as I believed he to be involved and would therefore have a “Conflict of Interest” if he remained. I tabled the Agreement to the Chair as is the normal way to Table a document and then those Councillors you mentioned left the Chambers in an awful hurry. When the recorded minutes came out for this meeting it was recorded incorrectly ( this happens a lot) stating that I had only given the Document to the Mayor and therefore wasn’t Tabled.( THe Mayor was the residing Chair) so I became gagged by incorrect minutes of the 22nov meeting. I believe that the actions of the other Councillors who left the meeting indicated to me that they may have had prior knowledge of the Ageement and therefore endeavoured to stop the proceedings by removing themselves and causing a lack of corum but it was too late I had tabled the Agreement thus making it Public knowledge.
I would like to see any minutes recording or indicating that Council have given their approval for our CE to sign off an Agreement of this Magnitude and if there is one show it to me. This Agreement has not been approved by a full Council and can not be signed without “Delegated Authority” being given by the Governance Group which is the Councillors it did not even go across the Mayors desk for his approval.WHY? These actions by our CE has put us in a position of embarrassment and a big credibility deficit before our Horowhenua Constituents

Questions that must be Answered!
1. Has the CE set a Precedent now that all matters being heard before our Courts be they Enviromental or others be $$$ bought off with Ratepayers money and the TRoR have indicated to all including their own that their Greviences can be settled in this manner “If the Price is Right”
2. Why didn’t TRoR consult with its supporters. (274s) who had at their own cost and supported them and their claims for a long time and believed in their cause around the matter of Waste Water on their Sacred sites suddenly get left holding the can while TRoR sold out for “Thirty Pieces of Silver”. NEVER AGAIN!
3. Why did TRoR negotiate with the HDCs CE and not as is normal “Rangatira to Rangatira” This has caused a lot of concerns within Raukawa. Maori protocols have been overlooked in order to get a monetary outcome and many are not pleased.
4. Why didn’t the HDC COUNCILLORS who knew this was going on not speak up but run for cover
5. Should we be using Ratepayers money to circumvent the Legal process through the RMA etc and Enviromental Court proceedings? This is a very large sum of money over 30 years!
6. Has this Agreement opened the door to a settlement process that we as Ratepayers are not prepared to fund, or are we?
7. How long has this been going on in our Council and what amounts have we paid out over the years and to who there are a number of MOUs that cost us a lot, with who?

These are my concerns personally and I share them with you so that you may understand my frustration when this is going on behind closed doors.

“Lake Horowhenua is on private land – it should not be seen in this century to be the local sewer for everyone else’s rubbish and pollutants”

From Vernonica Harrod

A range of historic firsts have been taking place at Horowhenua Lake Domain Board meetings in Levin since new board chair Jenny Rowan took up the role earlier this year.

A former mayor of Kapiti Coast District Council Ms Rowan, who represents the Board on behalf of the Director General of the Department of Conservation, delivered an historic first when she made a verbal submission in response to Horowhenua District Council’s first 20 year Long Term Plan consultation document last week.

She said the Board, “has responsibilities for the Domain land, buildings, and the surface waters of the lake for recreational purposes, so has an interest in what water (mostly storm water) enters the lake.

She said Lake Horowhenua is, “on private land – it should not be seen in this century to be the local sewer for everyone else’s rubbish and pollutants. The responsibility surely lies with other private land owners to be managing their own properties in a way that protects the lake from their pollutants such as nitrates, heavy metals and sediment run off. We would expect the HDC to invest in educating industry and agricultural operators better on their obligations around runoff and farm management.”

Then there was another first when the Board chair stated an intention, “to have meetings at a venue he [Philip Taueki] can attend” as there is a trespass notice preventing Mr Taueki from entering the council building in Levin. This means he cannot attend Board meetings. Mr Taueki is the great great grandson of paramount chief Taueki who signed the Treaty of Waitangi, and he is an owner of Lake Horowhenua.

Ms Rowan also said the fact that water to Mr Taueki’s residence at Lake Horowhenua has been turned off raised questions about the “human rights and morality of the decision.” In a verbal submission to the Board former councillor Anne Hunt said Mr Taueki has lived in a residence with no water supply for over 500 days. Horowhenua District Council chief executive David Clapperton has refused to turn the water back on.

Horowhenua mayor Michael Feyen said he found the decision to turn the water off, “a breach of human rights…concerned about HDC taking the action it has and what it might lead to further down the track.”

Ms Rowan reiterated, “We need to have more conversations with Phillip. I am very committed to sorting this out. I find it unacceptable. He is down there. The Toby for the water is on Domain Board land. Need to think about this team,” she said to the other board members seated around the table. “We have a responsibility to turn that water on.”

 

 

Why are Horowhenua’s State-owned properties selling to private property developers for well below their Capital Value?

This is actually happening up & down NZ however this article by Veronica Harrod focuses on the Horowhenua. How is this fair given the pensioner housing sold at a loss of $1.86 million and the council wallows in burgeoning debt ($68 mill last time I looked) as are councils up and down the land. The new norm. Next of course will be rates rises to cover this debt & woe betide anybody who complains about that. Never mind the obvious mismanagement of funds on high by very well paid CEs everywhere. Our grandparents who helped accumulate these assets must be turning in their graves… EnvirowatchRangitikei


From Veronica Harrod

 

Land and development company owned by council deputy mayor Wayne Bishop purchased former Horowhenua Hospital site in 2014.

A land and property development company owned by Horowhenua District Council deputy mayor Wayne Bishop paid less than a quarter of the Capital Value for Levin’s former Horowhenua Hospital site in 2014.

According to the Quotable Values database the 4.92 hectare site listed as “Other-Health/Medical” which had a Capital Value of $3.8 million was sold to Wayne Bishop Investments Ltd on August 2014 for $968,000.

Cr Bishop also purchased the 48 hectare former Kimberley Hospital site on leasehold land in 2014 from MidCentral Health where he has been developing a staged “gated” 500 housing lifestyle development called Speldhurst Country Estate. In one year the RV of the former Kimberley Hospital site sky-rocketed from $3.8 million to $11.8 million.

Wayne Bishop Investments Ltd has made three other strategic land purchases adjacent to the former Horowhenua Hospital site including, in one instance, one he paid over six times the Registered Valuation (RV) for.

According to the Quotable Value database on 13 August 2014 Wayne Bishop Investments paid $968,000 for a residential-vacant lot in Hinemoa Street which had a RV of $165,000.

Two years later on September 1, 2016 Wayne Bishop Investments paid $1.2 million, double the RV of $520,000, for 2.33 hectares of land next to the former hospital site which means he owns 10.5 hectares of prime real estate land on Liverpool Street.

His company also purchased another 3.6 hectare block of land behind the former hospital site where Hinemoa Street and Awatea Street joins with Waimarie Park.

Last year the council voted in a publicly excluded council meeting to sell the council owned pensioner housing portfolio for a firesale price of $5.2 million to land and property developer Willis Bond which includes pensioner housing units at Waimarie Park.

An Audit NZ report for the Year ending 30 June 2017 presented to the public for the first time at the February 18 Finance, Audit and Risk committee revealed the council lost $1.86 million on the sale of the pensioner housing and 1.1 hectare of land to Willis Bond.

According to a leaked copy of the terms of sale Willis Bond are only required to retain the pensioner housing portfolio as community housing until 2029 but the public don’t know whether Cr Bishop has a conflict of interest or whether he declared a conflict of interest, because voting was done behind closed doors.

Cr Bishop has three land and development companies including Wayne Bishop Investments Ltd, Wayne Bishop Builder and Wayne Bishop that collectively own extensive land and property interests across New Zealand including Horowhenua.

After he was elected Cr Bishop openly stated in a media interview he would represent the “development community”, a euphemism for land and property developers, and revealed he had four Horowhenua land and property developments on the go.

He is now in an influential council position as deputy mayor and deputy chair of the council’s in-house economic development board, which has multi-million dollar vested interests in land and property development and construction industries.

Since he was elected to council in 2011, after securing 519 of 2189 votes, council has become increasingly involved in pushing a land and development agenda – including rolling out an extensive number of land and development projects – to such an extent the district is now referred to as the construction hub of the lower North Island.


Veronica Harrod is a qualified journalist with a Master of Communications specialising in traditional and new media content. Investigating and reporting on political, economic and legislative trends that negatively impact on the day to day lives of people is one of her main areas of interest. Lifestyle content she is interested in includes celebrating our own especially the tireless work community advocates do as civil citizens participating in democracy to keep those in power on their toes. In a media age dominated by a multi billion dollar communications and public relations industry paid to manipulate information to protect and advance the interests of the few over the many there have to be journalists who are impervious to the all pervasive influencial role they have over local and central government and corporate interests.

For more information about Veronica’s professional qualifications see her Facebook page.


RELATED:
Massive Rates Rises Predicted in Horowhenua that will Subsidize Land Developers Reaping Potential Profits of Over $100 Million
THE ILLUSION OF DEMOCRACY – HOROWHENUA DISTRICT COUNCIL IS ROLLING ITS NEW DEPUTY MAYOR AND WON’T BE OPENING THE BOOKS … WHAT’S TO HIDE?

NOTE: Cr Campbell was originally removed from his new post as DM because he had spoken out about conflicts of interest within council as I recall it at that meeting which was preceded by a public protest and also streamed.

Expressway past Levin is a high stakes game to HDC’s in-house Economic Development Board

From Veronica Harrod

Expressway past Levin a high stakes game

The land and property development agenda of Horowhenua District Council and council’s in-house economic development board would implode if the New Zealand Transport Agency decides not to proceed with the expressway past Levin demonstrating just how high the stakes are.

Otaki electorate MP Nathan Guy, a National Party MP, brought along National Party leader Simon Bridges and new transport minister Jami-Lee Ross to the second Levin public meeting Mr Guy has held in the last six weeks pushing for the expressway to proceed. Mr Bridges was the transport minister under the former National led Government.

The motivations of Mr Guy, in particular, are questionable in light of council’s role in land and property development which is entirely based on a November 2015 New Zealand Institute of Economic Research (NZIER) report commissioned by the council and the board called, “Investment in transport infrastructure: Effects on economic and demographic outlook.”

A July 6, 2016 council agenda states, “The assessment determined that the Wellington National Corridor investment represents a ‘free hit’ to Horowhenua, and creates an opportunity for the district to target population growth, employment, and economic activity levels significantly higher than both otherwise and previously expected.”

Council’s chief executive David Clapperton and economic development manager Shanon Grainger have repeatedly used forcasted growth statistics included in the NZIER report as a justification for rolling out an explosion in the number of land and development projects across the district.

Without the economic justification’s provided for in the NZIER report difficult questions would be asked of council about its close and secretive relationship with the economic development board, whose members have multimillion dollar interests in land and development and construction industries.

Council draft and consultation documents that rely on the expressway proceeding include council’s 20 year Long Term Plan, the Horowhenua growth strategy 2040 and the yet-to-be released Levin Town Centre Plan.

According to the Quotable Values database Mr Guy also has a significant amount of land and property interests in the north east sector of Levin at Koputaroa, one of the preferred expressway routes, which equates to at least $6 million over eight separate lots. The sale date of two further purchases he made in this sector is withheld from the Quotable Value database so have not been included.

If the expressway does proceed this means Mr Guy could potentially financially benefit from the expressway either through the sale of land confiscated under the Public Works Act or land and property development projects on land he owns next to the expressway route.

The decision made by NZTA could be a game changer for Horowhenua with residents facing unsustainable rates rises due to land and property development and associated negative environmental effects from an explosion in new builds connecting to an essential infrastructure council’s LTP states is ageing and end of life.

According to council’s 20 year draft and consultation documents there are no plans by council to consult the community on an economic development strategy moving into the future even though the public were not consulted on the now expired 2014-2017 economic development strategy that continues to be applied by the council.

Image may contain: 3 people, people smiling, suit
Photo, from left, Otaki MP Nathan Guy, former Prime Minister Bill English and former Horowhenua District Council mayor Brendan Duffy at an Electra After 5 event.

Findings and assessments from the NZIER report were presented at an “After 5” event on 24 March 2016.

Does Horowhenua District Council’s first 20 year Long Term Plan walk the talk on community outcomes?

Does Horowhenua District Council’s first 20 year Long Term Plan walk the talk on community outcomes?

The cheerful exterior of the Horowhenua District Council’s first 20 year Long Term Plan (LTP) consultation document contrasts markedly with the content inside.

The community is becoming increasingly distressed about council’s intention to impose skyrocketing annual rates increases of between $500 and $700 in urban areas and at least $2000 for rural residential and farms in the next ten to fifteen years to construct new water and waste water systems in five targeted areas.

Which is why it is questionable the council is committed to walking the talk on “community outcomes” included in the LTP which includes a “sense of place”, a “safe and supportive environment” that is “inclusive, connected [and gives the] opportunity to influence local outcomes and decisions.”

Despite new essential infrastructure being planned due to “new growth” council has stated in the LTP reintroducing Development Contributions, that land and property developers used to pay to help fund essential infrastructure costs, won’t be discussed until 2019-2020. Development Contributions were cancelled by council in 2015.

Council’s apparent refusal to reintroduce development contributions is despite an admission by council in the LTP on Horowhenua’s essential infrastructure that, “many of these assets are now reaching, or have already passed, the end of their expected life.”

The LTP states a preference to “progressively pay for more asset renewals from rates and operating surpluses” which raises the question of why council has also signalled an intention in the LTP to increase debt levels by 20 percent to $171 million. What is the increased debt paying for if not one of the most expensive costs of a council: essential infrastructure?

Also there are no operating surpluses as the LTP states, “Council has a history of budget deficits which, in the last LTP, we hoped to turn around by 2018-2019…we are now working to turn this around….by 2021-2022.”

This means ratepayers will be entirely and solely responsible for new asset renewals in the foreseeable future when an extensive number of land and property development projects, included in the council’s draft Horowhenua Growth Strategy 2040, are due to be rolled out

From November 2017 to March 2018 urban residents connected to council water systems experienced water restrictions for three months but none of these areas are targeted for significant essential infrastructure improvements over the next twenty years.

The council also does not intend to develop new waste management solutions in Levin either despite being a Lake Accord partner committed to restoring heavily polluted waterways and Lake Horowhenua in an area of cultural and environmental significance.

Council has also indicated a preference to dispose of ALL community halls. In the LTP council makes the comment, “if selling them proves unsuccessful in some cases there may be no other option but to demolish derelict buildings.”

Submissions close on March 26 and hearings and deliberations will be carried out in May before the final 20 year LTP is adopted by council in July.


 

Audit NZ report of Horowhenua District Council highlights continuing concerns

Horowhenua District Council lost $1.86 million on the sale of the pensioner housing and 1.1 hectare of bare land to land and property dealer Willis Bond according to a recently released Audit NZ report.
The loss on the sale contradicts statements made by council’s chief executive David Clapperton in an April 5, 2017 Community Connections newsletter that, “There are..important criteria, including a realistic price offer.” A council Community Housing Transfer document also stated the aim was to “receive a fair market value on sale.”
The Audit NZ report for the Year ending 30 June 2017, presented to the February 18 Finance, Audit and Risk committee, noted “some of” Audit NZ’s “recommendations from last year’s reports to the council had been addressed, but there were still improvements required.”
The council was criticised on a number of fronts including presenting an incomplete set of draft accounts in “some areas” and “delays during the audit in receiving follow-up information especially in relation to [council owned land and property] revaluations and some service performance measure support” which impacted on “the timeliness and completion of audit work.”
Other concerns include a lack of controls over council’s expenditure system. “Although management has developed a report that may assist to mitigate the risks of unauthorised expenditure, without the one-up review there is still the risk of fraud and inefficiencies.”
“Recommendations have been made [by Audit NZ] in previous years to enhance the purchase order controls in the expenditure system to specifically require purchase orders to be approved on a one up basis. This would decrease the risk to the district council by providing a mechanism to prevent inappropriate expenditure being incurred.”
The Audit NZ report stated that previously manager’s were required to independently review or approve a purchase order but, “there is now no requirement for manager approval over the subsequent invoice.”
According to an updated council Delegations Register Mr Clapperton is authorised to spend up to $1 million on specified contracts for services.
In a ‘Review of Sensitive Expenditure Internal Audit’ 9 August 2017 report financial audit, tax, and advisory company KPMG said an alternative approach to the “one-up review” was required for the chief executive and the Mayor because “there is no more senior person.”
KPMG recommended, “the customer and community services group manager approve the chief executive’s sensitive expenditure and the chief executive approve the mayor’s sensitive spending and the mayor approve the customer and community service group manager’s sensitive spending.”
Although KPMG and Audit NZ have both expressed concerns about control over council spending the council told Audit NZ, “both last year and again this year, that there is no intention to following a one-up approval approach in the electronic purchase order system.”
“It is Council’s view that sufficient controls currently exist in the procurement process and the implementation of one up approval for purchase orders would neither be operationally efficient nor significantly lessen the risk.”
On conflict of interest matters the Audit NZ report stated, “more detail still needs to be included for handling of issues, breaches and their mitigations…for such areas as secondary employment.”
Audit NZ also found, “not all assets in the land and buildings asset class were revalued and there were assets that were revalued by the valuer that the District Council no longer owned.”
Audit NZ also found that, “Adjustments to the valuation information were difficult to follow and increased the audit time involved in reviewing the valuation work” and that, “The valuations assumed that useful lives of infrastructure assets had remained the same and no review was done against asset condition.”


Veronica Harrod is a qualified journalist with a Master of Communications specialising in traditional and new media content. Investigating and reporting on political, economic and legislative trends that negatively impact on the day to day lives of people is one of her main areas of interest. Lifestyle content she is interested in includes celebrating our own especially the tireless work community advocates do as civil citizens participating in democracy to keep those in power on their toes. In a media age dominated by a multi billion dollar communications and public relations industry paid to manipulate information to protect and advance the interests of the few over the many there have to be journalists who are impervious to the all pervasive influencial role they have over local and central government and corporate interests.

For more information about Veronica’s professional qualifications see her Facebook page.

Will Horowhenua ratepayers be paying for new water systems?… a demand created by land developers whom Council have exempted from Development Contributions

Information on financial impacts of new water and waste water systems still not available: All ratepayers potentially impacted.

Horowhenua District Council has refused to answer a direct question on the expected financial impact on ratepayers if new water and waste water systems are installed in five targeted areas including Waitarere, Hokio, Ohau, Manakau and Levin.

In response to a question asking for the impact “in dollar terms” Mr Clapperton replied, “Page 18 of the Consultation Document [2018-2038 Long Term Plan] explains the annual increase in rates for all households in the district currently connected to water.

“Within the new infrastructure settlements rates would increase by more since they would begin to pay the Water Supply Targeted rate when they start to receive this service.”

The service is forecasted to be delivered between 2027 and 2036. Waitarere has a waste water system but no water system.

As if Mr Clapperton’s answer isn’t confusing enough page 18 of the consultation document contains a table which includes the expected rates increases in each targeted area which gives the impression only the rate where the ratepayer lives will be applied.

However, the consultation document also makes the statement, “This additional service would mean an increase…for ALL [emphasis mine] households in the Horowhenua District who are connected to water [and waste water] services.”

A resident living in one of the targeted areas said in a conversation she had with the council’s asset manager engineer Sarie Van der Walt, the LTP contact on infrastructure included in the consultation document, ratepayers would be charged all the rates increases in the targeted area; not just the rate increase for the area where they lived.

Combined the total amounts to an expected $646.70 annual increase in rates but this is still less than half the amount councillor Christine Mitchell said rates are likely to increase in Waikawa Beach if new water and waste water systems are built.

Cr Mitchell reportedly made the comment at the last Waikawa Beach Ratepayers Association AGM in December 2017 which was included in the WBRA newsletter as a predicted $1500 annual increase. She has not responded to requests for comment.

The council has therefore been asked the same question again to provide dollar figures for the expected rates impact if council’s preferred option of installing new water and waste water systems is adopted by council.

If ALL ratepayers connected to water and waste water systems are affected this could also impact ratepayers in all the other areas including Levin, Foxton, Foxton Beach, Tokomaru and Shannon.

Existing ratepayers are concerned they are having to pay for a demand created by land developers who have not had to pay one cent towards essential infrastructure costs since council cancelled development contributions in 2015.

In answer to this inequity Mr Clapperton said, “Council will be looking at several options to assist with funding growth-related projects, Development Contributions being one of the options available.”

However in the consultation document council says it won’t be considering the reintroduction of development contributions paid by land developers towards essential infrastructure until year 2019-2020.

Submissions on the consultation 20 year Long Term Plan close on March 26. The same day as consultations on the 2040 draft Growth Plan and Earthquake prone buildings also closes.

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Lake Horowhenua epitomises the New Zealand Government’s disdain for its indigenous people – both past and present

Lake Horowhenua epitomises the New Zealand Government’s disdain for its indigenous people – both past and present. Throughout the history of Aotearoa, Mua-Upoko has always been at the mercy of a Crown intent on suppressing the cultural and environmental concerns of the indigenous owners of this lake in order to enhance the recreational and economic pursuits of the Pakeha.
Most recently, it was the crux of a case appealed to the Supreme Court, a court supposedly attuned to the nuances of the Treaty of Waitangi. In effect, the Supreme Court has invalidated itself. And Parliament as well. By ceding sovereignty, the Chiefs of New Zealand were guaranteed by the Queen of England ‘full, exclusive and undisturbed possession’ of lands and other property they and their descendants individually or collectively possess.

The Crown’s jurisdiction, its authority to govern therefore rests upon compliance with the Treaty. Before all nations at the United Nations human rights hearing in Geneva on 30 January 2014, the Minister of Justice affirmed the Treaty of Waitangi to be New Zealand’s founding document. Without compliance, this Treaty disintegrates.

And so does governance by Parliament and jurisdiction from the courts.
In terms of ownership, Lake Horowhenua is unique. It is, and always has been owned by
Mua-Upoko; since 1886 in English title.
But there is more to the legend of the lake than constitutional matters of property rights.
Lake Horowhenua was purchased not in cash. It was bought in blood. Here on the artificial islands Mua-Upoko created for their own refuge, Te Rauparaha and his Ngati Toa
raiders stockaded men, women and children ‘killing some from day to day as required for food’. Concealed in clearings nearby, Taueki and the remnants of Mua-Upoko would hear their kin, across the silence of the lake; unable to rescue them if their tribe was to survive.
READ MORE

https://www.mfe.govt.nz/sites/default/files/media/Fresh%20water/RegulationAndReform/hunt-a–g.pdf

Type ‘Horowhenua’ into the search box for further articles on the damning history of Lake Horowhenua. See also ‘categories’ (left of page) & our Local Govt Watch pages, Horowhenua. A must read also is the author’s book about the Lake called ‘Man of Convictions’.

Photo: Wikipedia

 

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