Category Archives: Gardens

Kiwis everywhere are growing their own food again

Up until the 1950s folks grew their own food as a matter of course. It was what you did. Supermarkets kind of changed that but folks are catching on to the fact that processed foods are frequently devoid of nutrients and our fresh produce is sprayed liberally with toxic chemicals bringing with them a myriad of health risks. The financial squeeze is also a motivating factor and people are getting their fingers in the soil and producing their own food for cheap.

Here are some examples of that in the North Island, one is in the far North, and another in Hawkes Bay, both beautiful warm regions for growing things. A third I noticed recently on Facebook in Palmerston North, closer to home, illustrating the wonderful value of communities getting together and growing food… and sharing. That’s how our forbears used to do it.


North Hokianga Food Co-op aiming for food security

SARAH HARRIS (stuff.co.nz)

Brother and sister Joe Thompson and Jackie Thompson are encouraging people to grow their own food and be self-sufficient.

“Brother and sister Joe Thompson and Jackie Thompson are encouraging people to grow their own food and be self-sufficient.” (Photo courtesy of Stuff.co.nz)

“North Hokianga residents are on the path to making their food pantries and larders entirely self-sufficient.

The North Hokianga Co-op aims to get residents growing their own produce and wants to build a boutique abattoir to process local meat.

Co-op organiser Jackie Thompson says the area wants to make the most of their natural resources and change attitudes towards food and where it comes from.

The Co-op held a “Kai Rangatira” day on October 10 to introduce the community to gardening methods and information. More than100 people turned out to learn about grafting, worm farms, traditional Maori medicine, honey and housing projects.

“Food comes from the supermarket, from over the counter in a package. We’re eating too much sugar and too much processed food. That is basically seen as normal….”

Read more:  http://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/local-news/northland/72995508/north-hokianga-food-coop-aiming-for-food-security


Aunty’s Garden

Published on Oct 9, 2015 (video at Tim Whittaker’s channel on Youtube)

“This is a short clip of Auntys Garden in Hastings. An amazing place to get fresh vegetables. Price = koha ..”

http://www.tim.co.nz
http://www.photodrone.co.nz

Posted on Facebook comments explain that the garden is  at “Waipatu Marae just before Whakatu in Hastings. It is a community garden that any one can get produce from. Payment is in form of a koha. Anyone is also welcome to go and help in the garden..”


Finally the Crewe Community Garden in Palmerston North have as their vision: “… to create a vibrant community hub whereradishes-788554_1280 neighbours are collectively involved in various sustainable living initiatives that provide healthy food, encourage social connections, and reduce family food budgets. A community garden achieves many of the goals that the group have.”

They also have a blog spot with the same name here
(Palmerston North (aka Palmy) is in the lower / central North Island.)
Check them out here on Facebook
There are many more of these ventures around the country, these are just three … really inspiring.

EnvirowatchRangitikei

Community Gardens are Catching On for Kiwis ….

This article is from the local newspaper, the Rangitikei Mail, courtesy of neighbourly.co.nz

Community gardens are indeed catching on. If you missed it a couple of days ago I featured the Todmorden (UK) ‘experiment’ that revolutionized the town. (Pam Warhurst, How we Can Eat our Landscapes). It’s so inspiring and so worth the watch … & at the Garden page there are articles on the topic if you haven’t time to watch the TED video there (13 mins approx).

Anyway, back to this post which is an article on community gardens in NZ and how they are catching on for people wanting to grow their own food but lacking the space to do it.

Read the article HERE

Or HERE, click on it to enlarge …

Rangitikei Mail, April 9th 2015
Rangitikei Mail, April 9th 2015

“The will to live life differently can start in some of the most unusual places….”

“The will to live life differently can start in some of the most unusual places….”

todmorden

From Pam Warhust in Todmorden. Here is one of the most amazing videos (13 mins) you’ll ever see if you have a love for transformation (and gardening). Like those TV programs featuring transformation of your home, your garden … anywhere … this ‘experiment’ can revolutionize the whole way townsfolk view gardening and its purpose in their surroundings. Representatives from the Todmorden project were invited to speak in Christchurch following the big 2011 earthquake to inspire their rebuild. Their system if you like, has spread around the world in fact … the TED video featured will show you just where. She and a group of volunteers … ‘we’re only volunteers and it’s just an experiment’ …  sitting around the kitchen table dreamed up this scheme to grow edibles around their town. Skipping all the usual paperwork and permission seeking they just went ahead and ‘did it’ … they grew edibles all over the place …  in front of the Health Center and the Police Station to name two. Amazingly, it all turned into a whole new tourist trade, inspiring growth in local small scale industries. People come from all over the world to see the Todmorden ‘experiment’ …  ‘even’, says Pam, ‘when nothing much is growing’. I’ll be surprized if you don’t just love this video … it is inspirational and magic… watch on the Gardening page where there are also links to articles you can read on Todmorden, or at its source on YouTube. (Note, on the Gardening page it is halfway down the page and entitled … ‘Pam Warhurst: how we can eat our landscapes’). Enjoy.

Check out Marjie Brickley’s garden

Blues

Hunterville local, Marjie Brickley turned a grassy railside patch into a beautiful wonderland of colour. She and late husband Ralph started 20 years ago by simply planting cuttings from their own garden across the road. This is a real before and after transformation … undertaken primarily by herself … Marjie was widowed soon after they started. She was even chosen as the New Zealand Gardener magazine’s Manawatu-Wanganui Gardener of the Year. Her garden is now a popular attraction for travelers passing through and for locals. View Marjie’s beautiful garden HERE