Category Archives: Bees

Politicians join with conservation groups in calling on the EPA to ban bee-killing pesticides until a full scientific review is conducted

(Natural News) State politicians and conservation groups urged the United States Environmental Protection Agency(EPA) to hold off approval of bee-killing neonics in order to conduct a full scientific review of the pesticides involved, reported an EcoWatch article.

Congressmen Earl Blumenauer and Jim McGovern recently reintroduced the Saving America’s Pollinators Act, a bill that blocks new neonicotinoid insecticides while the EPA is investigating the full extent of their effects on bees, humans, other animals, and the environment.

Various conservation groups and environmental organizations have also presented a huge collection of public comments to the EPA. More than 100,000 individuals are pressing the agency to reduce the widespread use of neonicotinoid pesticides.

Neonics have been cited by numerous studies as a major driving factor in the decline of pollinator populations. The insecticides also threaten birds and aquatic invertebrates, according to research by EPA-employed scientists. (Related: EPA, Monsanto face lawsuit over pesticide drift that damaged millions of acres and threatened endangered species.)

Numerous studies say neonics are deadly

The EPA is currently investigating the preliminary ecological and human health risks posed by the neonicotinoids clothianidin, thiamethoxam, and dinotefuran. It is also performing a preliminary ecological risk assessment for the widely-used imidacloprid.

According to the agency’s initial risk assessments, neonics turned out to be lethal to birds that consumed grass, seeds, and dead insects contaminated by the insecticides.

“EPA’s recent assessment confirms what the science has already shown,” remarked Nichelle Harriott of the environmental group Beyond Pesticides. “[That] neonicotinoids are highly toxic not just to bees, but to aquatic species and birds [also]. She stressed the importance of the EPA taking actions against those chemicals to protect U.S. waterways and pollinators.

“Our nation’s beekeepers continue to suffer unacceptable mortality of 40 percent annually and higher,” said Andrew Kimbrell of the Center for Food Safety.

According to him, neonicotinoid contamination of numerous water sources endanger both wild pollinators and wetland birds. Kimbrell urged the EPA to accept the findings of numerous scientific literature and take appropriate actions to reduce the negative effects of these insecticides.

Research efforts showed that even small amounts of neonics can deprive migrating songbirds of their sense of direction when they need it most. And a United States Geological Survey study determined that the pesticide level in the Great Lakes are endangering important aquatic insects.

“By harming pollinators like bees and butterflies, and natural pest control agents like birds and beneficial insects, neonicotinoids are sabotaging the very organisms on which farmers depend,” said Cynthia Palmer of the American Bird Conservancy.

Neonics have already contaminated U.S. food supplies. A joint study by the American Bird Conservancy and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health discovered neonicotinoids in food samples taken from dining halls in the U.S. Capitol building.

As many as five different neonics were found in meals that congressmen, senators, and their staff eat every day.

EPA dragging feet on neonics crisis

Neonicotinoids are banned in Europe, while the Pest Management Regulatory Agency of Canada urges a similar ban on imidacloprid, the most widely-used neonic formula.

“The only thing that is keeping the U.S. from joining other nations in banning the use of these devastating poisons is the immense profit that fuels PR campaigns, intense lobbying efforts, and questionable studies designed to mislead us on the harm these poisons do,” accused Dr. Luke Goembel of the Central Maryland Beekeepers Association.

READ MORE

https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-03-04-conservation-groups-epa-ban-bee-killing-pesticides-scientific-review.html

How are cell towers and radiofrequency radiation impacting birds, bees and bats? Read U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services Reports

We’re seeing so many die offs now, globally & here in NZ. Recently here bees, blue bottle jelly fish, pipi, tuatua & eels. With no really substantial answers from mainstream. Doesn’t take a rocket scientist to notice how polluted our world is now that it’s miraculous anything survives at all in it. This article’s from 2009. Electromagnetic frequency is ramping up now & with 5G, how ever will these our friends, survive? We’re all part of the global food chain & ignoring that will surely be our own demise. The article points to 2035 for the extinction of bees.

From electromagnetichealth.org

18.05.2009

How are cell towers and radiofrequency radiation impacting birds, bees and bats? New reports have been issued recently by Albert M. Manville, II, Ph.D., Senior Wildlife Biologist, Division of Migratory Bird Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Albert_Manville@fws.gov). PDFs of the reports can be downloaded here:

Towers, Turbines, Power Lines, and Buildings – Steps Being Taken by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to Avoid or Minimize Take of Migratory Birds at These Structures PDF iconDownload PDF

Briefing Paper on the Need for Research into the Cumulative Impacts of Communication Towers on Migratory Birds and Other Wildlife in the United States Division of Migratory Bird Management (DMBM), U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service PDF iconDownload PDF

A link to a worthwhile report by Dr. rer. nat. Ulrich Warnke, PhD, “Bees, Birds and Mankind”, is also attached …

READ MORE

http://electromagnetichealth.org/electromagnetic-health-blog/emf-and-warnke-report-on-bees-birds-and-mankind/

Thousands of bees are dying in Murchison. No-one knows why

This is so tragic. We’ve just seen bees dying in the Coromandel. Now Murchison. There have been many die offs of other creatures/insects/marine life for some time now. Small wonder with the state of our planet now. It is so highly polluted it is anybody’s guess what has caused each of them. EnvirowatchRangitikei

From Stuff.co.nz

Hundreds of thousands of bees are dying in Murchison, near Nelson, and beekeepers are at a loss to save them.

Veteran beekeeper Ricki Leahy said he first noticed dead bees in front of his hives in the Mangles Valley last Friday.

Leahy, who is an ApiNZ board member, produces Tutaki Honey through his business Trees and Bees. He said the 40 hives used for queen rearing around his home had been affected, as well as another 186 hives located half a kilometre down the road.

Leahy estimated the number of dead bees to be in the hundreds of thousands.

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Dead bees from eight hives in Mangles Valley Murchison Photo: Ricki Leahy

READ MORE:
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“We had a look at them again this morning to see if we could rescue any and it is just hopeless, there are so many dead bees.”

The hives were fine when Leahy checked them on Thursday, but bees had continued to die since Friday.

“What bees are left are looking very unstable on their feet, they have got the jitters and there is actually nothing we can really do to help the situation. There is nothing we can do. ”

In his 40 years beekeeping, Leahy said he hadn’t experienced a loss of hives on such a scale and that the impact was “absolutely devastating”.

READ MORE

https://www.stuff.co.nz/environment/100789676/thousands-of-bees-dying-in-murchison-from-suspected-poisoning

Pesticides Linked to Declining Bee Populations Also Threaten Birds and Small Mammals

From organicconsumers.org

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has determined that popular pesticides linked to declining bee populations also pose a threat to birds and, in some cases, small mammals and insects.

The EPA released preliminary scientific assessments of four chemicals from the neonicotinoid or “neonic” class of insecticides on Friday as part of an ongoing review that environmentalists and farmers are watching closely. Previous EPA assessments echoed research showing that neonics can harm the bees we rely on to pollinate crops when sprayed on cotton and certain fruits and vegetables.

“The EPA’s assessments confirm neonicotinoid pesticides are extremely harmful to birds and aquatic life at the very center of our ecosystems,” said Lori Ann Burd, director of the Center for Biological Diversity’s environmental health program, in a statement.

Environmentalists blame all four of the neonic pesticides under review at the EPA — clothianidin, thiamethoxam, dinotefuran and imidacloprid — for declining populations of honey bees, butterflies and other pollinators, including several endangered species. Of the four, imidacloprid is probably the most widely used and controversial.

In their most recent assessment, EPA scientists determined that imidacloprid poses an “acute risk” to birds when sprayed on crops. Birds, small mammals and insects could also be harmed if they eat crop seeds treated with the pesticide.

The findings echo a report published earlier this year that found imidacloprid and the controversial organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos can impair songbirds’ ability to find their way while migrating. Environmentalists are also concerned that the chemical may pose health risks to humans, including cancer and increased rates of autism in young children.

In 2016, the EPA also found that imidacloprid “potentially poses risk to [bee] hives when the pesticide comes in contact with certain crops that attract pollinators,” according to a preliminary assessment released at the time.

 

Bees and Glyphosate

Bee Poster

Currently in the Rangitikei, as in many other places, Roundup is the herbicide of choice for cleaning up weeds. Recently however, the World Health Organization (WHO) has taken recognition of the decades of independent research that warns of its health risk. WHO is warning people of the fact that it probably causes cancer. Check out the Glyphosate page on this site for further information on that.

pesticides_roundup_herbicide_735_250
Roundup, the herbicide of choice that contains glyphosate and is toxic to our bees

Personally I approached the Rangitikei District Council (RDC) twelve months ago to warn them of these dangers and make known to them the vast amount of research that exists linking it with not only cancer but many other illnesses including birth defects. Now, add to this another damning factor … its toxicity to bees. Bees are essential for pollinating our plants. As the poster above conveys,experts confirm that if the bees die off, we humans could well follow. Our toxic environments are destroying the very organisms that ensure the continuation of life on planet earth.

That said, the RDC is not convinced by either the extensive research or any announcements by WHO. Currently in fact, going by the last time I heard them discuss this (March 2015) they are of the opinion that I am the only person in the Rangitikei who is concerned about this. We now have a petition that indicates there are in fact another 97 who are. Good news. If you are connected with the Rangitikei, spend any time visiting, live here or intend to, please consider signing the petition.

Watch for further updates and information on the role of bees in our food chain.

~ Envirowatchrangitikei ~

The Glyphosate Presentation to the Rangitikei District Council Pt.1

Following on from the recent update on the chemical spraying presentation made to the Rangitikei District Council forum in November 2014, and featured in the Central District Times recently,  I’ve offered some thoughts on the Council process. This may be informative for some, and  may also dispel some illusions about our so-called democratic processes.

A few weeks ago at the last Council meeting, March 26th, a verdict was given  by RDC about the presentation … chemical sprays in public spaces. (The terms Glyphosate and Roundup are used interchangeably here. The active ingredient in Roundup is Glyphosate). To bring you up to speed with the original presentation, you can read it at this link … https://envirowatchrangitikei.wordpress.com/2014/12/10/a-presentation-to-council-regarding-chemical-herbicide-spraying-in-public-places/  

The Process

When anyone presents an issue of concern at a Council forum the time limit is five minutes which includes question time, so it is really only four. Bear in mind with an issue this large this is not long. I had to condense my case to the quintessential and speak at top speed. Also bear in mind that in attending Council meetings there is little if any space for actual dialogue around issues. Five minutes is it. The process is not that people friendly (one Cr didn’t hide the fact he found the issue humorous) nor conducive to meaningful interaction or problem resolution. The Mayor, Andy Watson, allowed two questions from the Councilors … one centered around other possible alternatives. These I provided as I’d researched them. The other was not a question, rather it was to tell me that Horizons could provide the correct information about spraying parameters / guidelines / exposure etc. That completed I was duly thanked for my presentation and I sat down. I quietly whispered to  a member of the Community Committee who was also there that day, asking her what happens next (quietly because you’re not supposed to be talking in there … and the Community Committee by the way, is a conduit group between community and Council).  It appears that I should have asked specifically for somebody to get back to me on the issue. Since I hadn’t,  that could well have been the very last I’d have heard about the issue.  Now who ever would know that ‘minor’ technicality about being heard? It could have effectively disappeared into the black hole, forgotten forever. As good fortune would have it however, after I’d left and the meeting continued, Cr Sheridan voted for the matter to be put on the Agenda. It was seconded by Cr Ash. The Council was going to research other NZ Council methods of weed treatment and write a report.

The History

Now, bear in mind here, seven or so months prior, I’d emailed Council citing the research on the health risks of using glyphosate sprays (the herbicide of choice by most councils throughout the country). This research had been dismissed as ‘unproven extrapolation’.  Cr Ash, and myself, had then met with the Mayor to discuss the research and the possibility of using non chemical sprays in the urban areas. He had sent us each away to research weed control methods used by other Councils with the prospect of RDC’s possibly considering  a  non-chemical alternative that was cost-effective … should we find one that is. In addition, information was given regarding how to get this issue onto the agenda using Council protocols. By all appearances, to the uninitiated, a very convoluted process. Because of these prior happenings, I already had a great deal of information on other councils, so later, I emailed contact details for an Auckland contractor with a cost effective hot water treatment.

During the interim I endeavoured to email updates to the Mayor and all Councilors about the surrounding facts on this issue since four minutes had clearly not enabled me to do this.  In addition I kept them up to speed with all the latest research that comes in at quite a steady pace these days. Councilors apparently, have a great deal of information to wade through I’m told,  so there are seldom any responses. Not even an ’email received’ message.

The Research

Anyway, regarding the research (and the case against Glyphosate is mounting) the latest is the World Health Organization’s announcement that Glyphosate probably causes cancer (and I see Dr Oz weighing in on this as well). In addition, Canterbury University has said Glyphosate causes resistance to antibiotics. Neither the

The Seralini Rats
The Seralini Rats

Mayor, the CEO nor the Councilors (bar two) are impressed by WHO’s research, or any of the large body of research that is available on Glyphosate. Not surprising since our Government approves it,  end of story.  Note here, many governments have actually banned it though and France’s highest Court ruled that Monsanto (the manufacturer) has lied about Roundup’s biodegradability.  Sadly, with the way Council works, there has been no opportunity for dialogue on this issue. Still, I do not believe it is rocket science.  I would be placing my money on WHO, Professor Seralini’s evidence and France’s highest Court, as opposed to the wisdom of the Rangitikei District Council in Marton or the NZ government (aka corporation) that says it is GE free by the way and is not. Remember, Monsanto initially tested their lab rats for the required ninety days … not long enough for tumours to develop. Professor Seralini’s team tested them for two years… long enough to grow enormous tumours.

Why is Monsanto not now re-testing for two years themselves to prove to the public their product is safe? And why was it so difficult for Prof Seralini to even get a sample of their Glyphosate-laced GM corn to use in his research?

(Watch the Seralini video HERE or read the damning transcript). Would you buy a used car on the car salesman’s word alone? This is historically what the authorities have done with Roundup. It’s all been on Monsanto’s say so.  Read more about the RDC’s decision in my next post.

Pam Vernon

~ Envirowatchrangitikei ~

Wally Richards’ Weekly Article: For your garden plus updates on Glyphosate, the Bees & Smart Meters

Here is Wally’s latest updates from his Weekly Newsletter page. Check out his website for lots of information & advice on local gardening plus recommended products. This week he’s commented on Big Tobacco, Germany, the bees and Bayer, and on the WHO and glyphosate….
WINTER IS COMING

Now that day light savings has finished we realise that winter is coming and in a number of areas light frosts have already occurred.

From my own experience in Palmerston North and talking to gardeners in other areas including Invercargill, the winters now days are very mild to what we experienced when we were young.

Heavy frosty mornings with frost lasting well into midday but nice sunny blue skies except when we had what we called a black frost.

That was when the frost did not disappear because the day would have heavy clouds, which did not allow the sun to warm the ground. Not nice.

These days in Palmerston North at least we do not have too many frosts in winter and usually the ones we have are light and soon disappear. Outside of the city you do not have to go far to find a good frosting when the conditions are right.

What has changed besides ‘climate change’ is the warmth that a city generates from houses, vehicles and street lighting. Pollution in the air also acts the same as cloud cover trapping heat and preventing frosts to settle. We are more likely to see fogs than frosts.

This bodes well for the more tender plants which would be damaged or killed by a good frost.

It does not help with control of pest insects and plant diseases which a good heavy frost will knock them for a six.

For us gardeners we still need to give more tender plants some protection and later in winter use methods to reduce disease and insect pests.

Now is the time to take action to help your plants survive the winter chills.

Apply Fruit & Flower Power to the root zone of plants that could be damaged, your preferred plants and any tender plants. The potash and magnesium in this product hardens up the foliage, strengthens the root system and helps to maintain nice green foliage.

Apply this month and again monthly for the next two months on evergreen plants but only once on deciduous plants and trees.

Wet weather diseases are caused by lots of rain and insufficient drainage.

The root systems need oxygen and if there is too much water then there is insufficient oxygen, the roots can hold their breath (so to speak) for a while but then they will start rotting.

You will see leaves turning yellow, curling and dropping followed by the plant’s death.

You can assist the plants to withstand wet weather diseases by spraying them with Perkfection Supa once a month for the next 3 months on evergreens such as citrus. One spray on your roses and deciduous trees at this time.

If you can; ensure that the drainage around plants that hate wet feet is improved where possible.

One easy way on established plants such as citrus or around the edge of vegetable gardens is to dig a trench one or two spades deep. On citrus and similar just out beyond the drip line.

Excess water will drain into the trench where wind and sun will evaporate it away quicker.

This is only needed where you know that ponding takes place during rainy times, good free draining areas are not so prone to the problems.

For our final protection of tender plants we can use the ‘spray on frost protection’ called Vaporgard.

Mixed at 15mls per litre in warm water and sprayed over the foliage of tender plants it will give them down to minus 3 degrees frost protection for 3 months within 3 days of application.

This works very well on the first frost but if there are several frosts in a row, night after night then additional protection such as frost cloth will be needed.

The reason for this is the damage to the cells does not have a chance to repair before they are frozen again.

Tender plants that are in containers can be moved to places where they are protected such as under the eaves or under evergreen trees. I now can keep impatiens and petunias in containers going year after year by using all the above suggestions and having them in sheltered areas.

Plants such as capsicums and peppers growing in open ground can be sprayed with Vaporgard under and over foliage and a couple of days later carefully lifted and placed into containers.

Then moved to a glasshouse or protected area like a porch where they will continue to produce for you slowly over winter as long as you keep them a little on the dry side.

Now that the soil is cooler and rains have starting to moisten the gardens; means you can plant your spring bulbs in sunny areas. Container grown bulbs are likely planted already.

Let your strawberries run and root in for a fresh lot of plants later in May.


LATEST NEWS:

Monsanto & Bayer

The latest news is very interesting as chemical company giants, Monsanto and Bayer are taking a hammering as reports about the harm some of their main products are doing to our health and the environment.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) recently placed glyphosate on level 4 meaning its a very probable cause of cancer. (Level 5 means it does definitely cause cancer.)

Monsanto’s cause was not helped by the video of pro-GMO Patrick Moore claiming Monsanto’s glyphosate is “safe to drink,” then walking out of an interview when asked to prove it, has been making the cyber-rounds. But perhaps no one has framed it better than Jeffrey Jaxen, a writer for Before It’s News.

Jaxen calls the Moore interview a “Big Tobacco Moment,” comparing it to the publicly televised statement in 1994, by William Campbell, then-CEO of tobacco giant Phillip Morris, who told Congress, “I believe nicotine is not addictive.”

Jaxen wrote: “When paradigms shift, tyrants fall, or corporations lose their market it is often not from some spectacular event, but by a single, humanizing display.”

If you have not seen it go to:  https://www.organicconsumers.org/news/gmos-big-tobacco-moment-shocks-public-awake

Bayer is loosing its battle; saying their toxic neonicotinoids such as Confidor are safe. Study after study show neonicotinoids are a key culprit in bee declines and are harming other organisms, from earthworms to birds.

Bayer filed a lawsuit against Friends of the Earth Germany in an
effort to shut down their campaign to save the bees. Thanks to the work
of concerned people across Europe, Bayer lost and Friends of the Earth
Germany won. This demonstrates the importance and power of organizing and
when the truth is revealed, people can push back against corporate power,
and win.

On the home front it was reported that Lloyds of London are not covering events
of smart meter fires or health risks associated with wireless devices. 

Likely soon most insurance companies will follow suit as they normally do
when Lloyds makes exclusions..

Are Smart Metres causing fires? According to TV3 news yes; within the
last five months there have been 67 call outs in Canterbury to
malfunctions involving power boxes, and 422 throughout the country.

Smart Meters & Power Surges Causing Fires

Your power company installs a smart meter and then when there is a power surge it can blow up appliances and possibly set your home on fire, which has happened in NZ and overseas.

Then you could find your Insurance company has wavered damage cause by Smart Metres.

Not only that but health problems cause by High Intensity Radio Frequencies are not going to be covered either. See:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dF-djNIb5Oc

People and children sensitive to this radiation can have problems of head aches, nose bleeds, emotional problems and sleeplessness. Makes for more interesting times.

Wally Richards