Roundup EXPOSED – The truth about pesticides, disease and scientific fraud

(NaturalHealth365) Roundup is a weed killer that’s showing up in our food supply; contaminating the waterways and the air we breathe. Yet, the biotech industry – with companies like Monsanto and Dow – continue to tell us, ‘we have nothing to worry about’ – in terms of all the agricultural ingredients used today.

So, what’s the truth?

Shocking truths exposed about Roundup and our current food production techniques

Just to be clear: Roundup is the most widely used herbicide in all of human history, and while farmers and homeowners alike use it daily, this highly-toxic product carries a wide range of health hazards – which are being systematically overlooked (and ignored) by government health agencies.

READ MORE PLUS AT THE LINK LISTEN TO THE PODCAST (LINK AT TOP LEFT OF SCREEN)

https://www.naturalhealth365.com/roundup-glyphosate-2465.html

3 thoughts on “Roundup EXPOSED – The truth about pesticides, disease and scientific fraud”

  1. Hi Pam,

    Having been following you write-ups about 1080 and round-up and the likes, it is interesting that the department of Conversation, sorry Conservation (I get this wrong all the time). I compiled a interesting list of the cock-ups the government of new zealand made over the years to combat so-called pests. They are so knowledgeable and so clever it bring tears to your eyes. Can you tell me who these incompetent morons are that make all this possible and want US to pay for their cock-ups?

    New Zealand
    Introduced and Invasive Species
    Mammals
    Common brushtail possum from Australia
    Cat from Europe
    Deer:
    Red deer from Europe
    Elk
    Sika deer from Asia
    Rusa deer from Asia
    White-tailed deer from North America
    Fallow deer
    Sambar deer [160]
    Donkeys: the Ponui donkey from Europe
    Cattle from Europe
    Ferret from Europe
    Goat from Europe
    Sheep
    European hare from Europe
    Mountain hare from Europe
    Horse from Europe
    European hedgehog from Europe
    Himalayan tahr from Himalaya
    Chamois from Europe
    Pig
    Rabbit from Europe
    Rats:
    Brown and black rats from Europe
    Pacific rat (kiore) from Pacific islands
    House mouse
    Least weasel from Europe
    Stoat from Europe
    Wallabies:
    Parma wallaby – population on Kawau Island
    Red-necked wallaby
    Swamp wallaby – population on Kawau Island
    Tammar wallaby
    Birds
    Acanthis flammea (common redpoll) [161]
    Acridotheres tristis (common myna) from India
    Alauda arvensis (Eurasian skylark) [162]
    Alectoris chukar (chuckor)[23]
    Anas platyrhynchos (mallard)
    Anser anser (greylag goose)[24]
    Apteryx australis (southern brown kiwi) onto Kapiti Island from mainland[163][164]
    Apteryx owenii (little spotted kiwi) onto Kapiti Island from mainland[165][166]
    Athene noctua (little owl)
    Branta canadensis (Canada goose)
    Cacatua galerita (sulphur-crested cockatoo) [167]
    Callipepla californica (Californian quail)[24]
    Carduelis carduelis (European goldfinch)
    Chloris chloris (European greenfinch)
    Colinus virginianus (bobwhite quail).[25]
    Columba livia (rock dove)
    Corvus frugilegus (rook)
    Coturnix ypsilophora (brown quail)
    Cygnus olor (mute swan)
    Dacelo novaeguineae (laughing kookaburra)
    Emberiza cirlus (cirl bunting)
    Emberiza citrinella (yellowhammer)
    Fringilla coelebs (chaffinch)
    Gallirallus australis (weka) onto numerous islands from mainland
    Gymnorhina tibicen (magpie) from Australia
    Meleagris gallopavo (wild turkey)
    Passer domesticus (house sparrow) from UK
    Pavo cristatus (Indian peafowl) [168]
    Phasianus colchicus (common pheasant) from Asia
    Philesturnus carunculatus (South Island saddleback) onto numerous islands from mainland
    Philesturnus rufusater (North Island saddleback) onto numerous islands from mainland
    Platycercus elegans (crimson rosella)
    Platycercus eximius (eastern rosella)
    Prunella modularis (dunnock, hedge sparrow or hedge accentor) from Europe
    Spilopelia chinensis (spotted dove)
    Strigops habroptila (kakapo) onto numerous islands from mainland
    Sturnus vulgaris (starling) from Europe
    Turdus merula (common blackbird) from Europe
    Turdus philomelos (song thrush) from Europe
    Reptiles
    Lampropholis delicata (delicate skink)
    Amphibians
    Green and golden bell frog[21]

    Fish
    Brown trout
    Salmon
    Catfish
    Gambusia affinis (western mosquitofish) [169]
    Scardinius erythrophthalmus (common rudd)
    Insects
    Monarch butterfly from US
    Common housefly from Europe
    Honey bee from Europe
    Polistes chinensis (Asian paper wasp)
    Polistes humilis (common paper wasp)
    Vespula germanica (European wasp)
    Vespula vulgaris (common wasp)
    Arachnids
    Varroa destructor (Varroa mite) [170]
    Redback spider (from Australia)
    Other Animals
    Didemnum vexillum (carpet sea squirt)
    Plants
    Up to 26,000 plants have been introduced into New Zealand. This list is a few of the more common and more invasive species.
    Gorse from Scotland
    Common broom – Cytisus scoparius
    Blackberry
    Lupin
    Ragwort
    Scotch thistle
    Californian thistle – Cirsium arvense
    Mistflower – Ageratina riparia
    Kahili ginger – Hedychium gardnerianum
    Japanese honeysuckle
    Old man’s beard – Clematis vitalba
    Invasive Species
    Mammals
    Brown rat or Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus)
    Black rat (Rattus rattus)
    Cat
    Chamois
    Common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula)[7][8]
    European hare
    European hedgehog[9]
    European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus)[10]
    Fallow deer
    Ferret (Mustela putorius furo)[11]
    Goat
    Himalayan tahr
    Horse (Equus ferus caballus)
    House mouse (Mus musculus)[12]
    Stoat (Mustela erminea)[7][13]
    Wallaby
    Reptiles
    Plague skink or rainbow skink (Lampropholis delicata)
    Birds
    Australian magpie
    Canada goose
    Common myna[7]
    Mallard
    Rook
    Greenfinch
    Common redpoll [1]
    Yellowhammer
    Cirl bunting
    European goldfinch
    Common starling
    Dunnock
    House sparrow
    Fish
    Gambusia affinis [2]
    Common rudd [3]
    Catfish
    Brown trout[15]
    Invertebrates
    Asian paper wasp (Polistes chinensis)
    Australian paper wasp (Polistes humilis)
    Common wasp (Vespula vulgaris)
    German wasp (Vespula germanica)
    Carpet sea squirt (Didemnum vexillum)
    Varroa mite (Varroa destructor)

    Plant species
    Acacia species (mostly Australian) especially wattle
    Acanthus – bears britches
    Agapanthus
    Arundo donax – giant reed (or elephant grass)[17]
    Banana passionfruit
    Boxthorn (Lycium ferossimum)
    Darwin’s barberry (Berberis darwnii)
    Cape sundew (Drosera capensis)
    Blackberry[16]
    Boneseed
    Broom (Cytisus scoparius)
    Buckthorn (Rhamnus alaternus)
    Californian thistle
    Cape tulip
    Christmasberry (Schinus terebinthifolius)
    Climbing asparagus (Asparagus scandens)
    Didymosphenia geminata (“didymo” or “rock snot”)
    Field horsetail (Equisetum arvense)
    Japanese honeysuckle
    Jasmine (Jasminum polyanthum)
    Gorse
    Heather
    Kahili ginger (Hedychium gardnerianum)
    Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta)
    Loquat
    Lupin
    Mexican daisy
    Mexican devil (Ageratina adenophora)
    Mistflower
    Morning glory (Convolvulus)[citation needed]
    Moth plant
    Old man’s beard
    Oxygen weed (Egeria)
    Oxygen weed (Lagarosiphon major)
    Pampas grass (Cortaderia selloana)
    Privet
    Tree privet
    Chinese privet
    Purple loosestrife
    Queen of the night (Cestrum nocturnum)
    Ragwort
    Rhododendron ponticum
    Salix fragilis (crack willow)
    Salix cinerea (gray willow)
    Scotch thistle
    Tradescantia fluminensis
    Sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus)
    Yellow flag (Iris pseudacorus)

    From:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Invasive_species_in_New_Zealand

    Liked by 1 person

    1. OMG! That’s some list there Pete. They get more ‘knowledgeable’ by the day even. Sixty years of 1080 & it’s still not working. Lot of lies going on too. We’re in such ‘capable’ hands aren’t we?

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