900, Yes 900, Studies Prove Statin Dangers

When a Medical Doctor sounds a warning then hadn’t we better investigate for ourselves? Properly. Clearly the medical establishment has been duped by the Big Pharma spin so in my opinion it’s past time we blindly trust them as our forbears once did. Get yourself a computer with a screen so you can read up thoroughly on these issues. A tiny phone isn’t going to do it. Better to research while you are well than wait for the dreaded diagnoses. Research your options early so you can make calm, informed choices about what you allow in the way of treatment. It’s your body. Your family. Your health. There are plenty of bona fide health professionals out there who are speaking out on the information you are not being given. One whistleblower I posted on a while back (an MD and former pharmaceutical executive) warned that MDs were told not to discuss side effects. You can ask for a list of those or google the product and read them that way for yourself. Get proactive.

 

From mercola.com

Doctors are being warned to think more carefully about prescribing cholesterol-lowering drugs by researchers who have found a wide range of “unintended” side effects.

Some doses and types of statins are linked with effects that include liver problems and kidney failure.

BBC News reports:

“Researchers looked at data from more than two million 30-84 year-olds from GP practices in England and Wales over a six-year period. Adverse effects identified in the study, published in the British Medical Journal, include liver problems, acute kidney failure, muscle weakness and cataracts.”

The fact that statin drugs cause side effects is well-established, and this latest study from the UK adds liver problems, acute kidney failure, muscle weakness and cataracts to the already fat list.

So Many People are Using Statins, it Boggles the Mind

In the UK, it won’t be long before one in four adults over the age of 40 are taking a statin drug, and physicians there have access to a computer program designed to analyze everyone within a 35-year age bracket to determine if they need to jump on the statin bandwagon.

Similarly, here in the United States the U.S. government’s National Cholesterol Education Program panel advised those at risk for heart disease to attempt to reduce their LDL (bad) cholesterol to specific, very low, levels back in 2004.

Before 2004, a 130-milligram LDL cholesterol level was considered healthy. The updated guidelines, however, recommended levels of less than 100, or even less than 70 for patients at very high risk, which increased the market for statin drugs exponentially.

Researchers are also urging cholesterol screening for about one-third of teens who are overweight or obese, which will put many of these kids right in the line of fire to be prescribed a dangerous statin drug.

The drug companies even tried to claim that statins should be used to treat the swine flu last year, if you can believe that!

The “experts” like to argue that statins have few downsides, so why not try them, just in case?

Of course, those “few downsides” can include muscle pain and weakness, peripheral neuropathy, and heart failure. Not to mention the 900 studies that show statin drugs are dangerous.

900, Yes 900, Studies Prove Statin Dangers

A paper published in the American Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs cites nearly 900 studies on the adverse effects of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, also called statins.

Muscle problems are the best known of statin drugs’ adverse side effects, but cognitive problems and pain or numbness in the extremities are also widely reported. A spectrum of other problems, ranging from blood glucose elevations to tendon problems, can also occur as side effects.

READ MORE

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2010/06/12/unintended-statin-sideeffect-risks-uncovered.aspx

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