The Poisoning of Our Children – Why You Should Buy Organic or Grow Your Own

“Children are especially vulnerable to the effects of many chemicals, but industrial chemicals are rarely tested for health and safety before sale ” ecochem.com

 

baby-1636317_1280.jpg

 

“Each day in the United States more than a million children age 5 and under who eat a normal diet ingest doses of organic phosphate pesticides that exceed the Environmental Protection Agency’s adult reference doses, according to a recent analysis of USDA and FDA data.

Twenty million American children age 5 and under eat an average of eight pesticides a day”  

apple-1248483_1280

The average apple has four pesticides on it after it has been washed and cored; some apples have as many as 10″ ecochem.com

“An increasingly vast body of evidence shows that some chronic conditions such as birth defects, cancers, and developmental disorders among children are linked to the poisons that are dumped into the food children eat, the water they drink, and the air they breathe. Children are especially vulnerable to the effects of many chemicals, but industrial chemicals are rarely tested for health and safety before sale”

Environmental Health Perspectives – a commentary on the book Poisoned Profits: The Toxic Assault on Our Children by Philip Shabecoff and Alice Shabecoff.


New Zealand’s Produce … is it Also Sprayed?

background-1239438_1280.jpg

NZ is not exempt from these chemicals. Herald has posted a ‘dirty dozen’ list of foods that have the least to the most chemicals. And organicnz‘s website features a more detailed exposé…

“Celery, a range of fruit, dairy products and bread are all ranked in the top dozen of foods available in New Zealand that are likely to contain more pesticide residues.1 Close contenders behind the ‘dirty dozen’ (see table for the list) were cucumber, nectarines, lettuce, tomatoes, wine and pears”.

bread-1510145_1280.jpg
Bread, unless organic, is ranked in the dirty dozen for pesticides … wheat crops are frequently dessicated with Roundup since the plants have been genetically altered to resist the pesticide

Table from organicnz.org 

Food  % with residues no. of pesticides sample size
Celery  98.2 21 56
Peaches, fresh/canned 96.4 15 56
Apricots, fresh/canned 96.4 14 56
Butter/cream/cheese 100 3 24
Wheat: bread, all products 79.3 23 232
Apples 80.5 20 288
Plums 91.6 8 48
Mandarins 83.3 10 36
Raspberries 85.4 7 48
Oranges 82.1 9 56
Strawberries 71.1 16 92
Grapes/raisins/sultanas 57.1 25 28

11049571_10152883937726235_125572452985920530_n.jpg

Do you really want to continue feeding your family toxic pesticides many of which are known carcinogens? I used to think peeling would take care of things until I learned recently of growers of oranges for export in the Gisborne area sprayed the ground around their orange trees with glyphosate (Roundup) in order for the tree’s roots to absorb it. This means it will be inside the oranges so can’t be removed. And glyphosate is in the middle of huge debate over its carcinogenicity. WHO deemed it a ‘probable carcinogen’ (See links to research and WHO’s report at the bottom of this page).  With a cocktail of up to ten pesticides on the average apple it really is not safe to be eating them. Remember the effect is cumulative which is why they get away with using these with impunity. By the time cancer appears and your chances of that are now one in three, there is little chance in today’s set up, to prove what caused it. It is in fact well known that exposure to environmental hazards are dangerous and predispose us to the development of cancer. Read Dr Samuel Epstein’s book ‘The Politics of Cancer’ examining this in the 1970s. Dr Meriel Watts of Pananz has also written a book about the effect of pesticides on our children: “Poisoning Our Future: Children and Pesticides”

Read OrganicNZ’s full article at this link:  https://www.organicnz.org.nz/node/120

“Poisoning Our Future: Children and Pesticides”

Front-Cover-Poisoning-Our-Future-small-211x300.jpg

According to Pesticide Action Network Aoteoroa New Zealand author, Dr Meriel Watts, “Children are not little adults. The activities they do make them more prone to accumulate pesticides in their bodies; and their developing bodies make them more prone to the negative effects of toxic chemicals such as pesticides. Yet government regulatory processes and tests do not look into these effects,” according to Dr Meriel Watts, author of the book. Tests used to approve use of pesticides do not look into endocrine disruption which can impact the physical, intellectual and behavioural development of the foetus and young child. The effects can include ADHD and autism and even conditions like obesity and breast cancer that can show up later in life in what is now referred to as the “foetal origins of adult disease”. Some childhood cancers like leukaemia have been linked to the exposure of parents to pesticides. Highly hazardous pesticides also damage the developing immune, nervous and reproductive systems.  PANANZ


See also fact sheets on the pesticides at Pananz website in the links below.


FURTHER LINKS:

PANANZ (Pesticide Action Network Aotearoa NZ)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2569128/

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/news/article.cfm?c_id=6&objectid=10819935

https://www.organicnz.org.nz/node/120

http://www.pananz.net/chlorpyrifos/

http://www.ecochem.com/t_organic_fert.html

Please use the share buttons to spread this information. Check out our pages on Chemicals and particularly Glyphosate at the main menu. Glyphosate is very widely used in NZ. Be proactive and protect your family.

EnvirowatchRangitikei

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Your comments are welcomed

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s