1080 Dropped Directly into Coromandel Water Supplies & baits left by DoC on public walkways & seats

This drop of 1080 occurred late in 2015. As those in the video illustrate, they were not warned to cease drawing drinking water from the streams. In addition young kids interviewed saw baits on seats, public walkways and in the water. None of this was cleaned up afterwards by DOC. Locals also cited the known death historically of 8 local dogs. Concerned people who inquired of DOC were told they have nothing to worry about and yet, the poison manufacturer’s warning advises against baits entering any body of water. It is ‘harmful to aquatic organisms’. ‘Department of Conservation’ is really a bit of a misnomer I would say… EnvirowatchRangitikei

TheGrafBoys

Published on Sep 23, 2015

On the 13th and 14th of September, 2015, the Department of Conservation aerially spread 1080 poison across 23,500 hectares of the Coromandel Peninsula. Enough poison was distributed to kill over 340,000 people.

Dairy farmer Bevin Fox tells how he was provided no alternative water supply while his cows drank water sourced from within the drop zone.

Coromandel locals tell how they were drawing water without being notified 1080 poison had been dropped a few hundred metres upstream …


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See the TheGrafBoys YT channel and website for more videos. Educate yourself on 1080 poisoning. See also http://1080science.co.nz/

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EnvirowatchRangitikei

3 thoughts on “1080 Dropped Directly into Coromandel Water Supplies & baits left by DoC on public walkways & seats”

  1. 1080- drops killing kauri conifer trees.
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    Alan Rennie
    Aug 31, 2018, 10:35 AM
    to me, Jim

    Hi JIM , You are the only one I have sent this to, can you give me your take on this, which I suspected for a while now, I have OIA doc for their first 1080 drop on great barrier in 1972 when they found kauri die back.

    .’ The carbon-carbon bond in the sodium mono-fluoroacetate molecule is less stable (weaker) than the carbon-fluorine bond, and so over time and with hydration (adding H2O), sunlight can break the bond down, and the molecule can degrade into sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3-) and methyl fluoride (CH3F). This could happen if the molecules are lying for some time in surface water in sunlight. How likely is this to be the situation in a forest? If the molecules have entered streams or ground water, they are also unlikely to break down via sunlight.

    The chemical equation for this possible break down, if it occurs, is:

    CH2FCOONa + H20 → NaHCO3 + CH3F with all elements and their symbols accounted for.

    KEY WORD HERE IS METHYL FLUORIDE

    Methyl fluoride is a volatile fluoro-hydrocarbon which rots the ozone layer and contributes to the ozone hole!

    SO IN SUMMARY, FLOURIDE/FLOURINE STAYS IN SOIL AND OZONE LAYER .

    Agathis australis, commonly known as the kauri, is a coniferous tree found north of 38°S in the northern districts of New Zealand’s North Island. It is the largest (by volume) but not tallest species of tree in New Zealand, standing up to 50m tall in the emergent layer above the forest’s main canopy.

    In 1972 sick and dying kauri trees were discovered in a forest stand on Great Barrier Island. This phenomenon came to be called “kauri dieback”. Early research concluded that a Phytophthora pathogen
    (a disease-causing agent) was involved. Recent research has identified the Phytophthora as a distinct and previously undescribed species, now commonly known as PTA (Phytophthora taxon Agathis). PTA is a tiny, fungus-like (water-mould), plant pathogen that only affects kauri.

    KEY WORD HERE IS CONIFERS, KAURI ARE CONIFERS

    A wide variety of plants are sensitive to fluoride toxicity (Table 1). Typical indoor foliage plants include Dracaena, Tahitian Bridal Veil (Gibasis pellucida), and the spider plant (Chlorophytum comosum). Both Dracaena deremensis and D. fragrans (corn plant) are very sensitive to fluoride toxicity. Fruits such as apricot, blueberry, grape, peach, and plums are also sensitive. Conifers that are sensitive include Douglas-fir, western larch, most pines, and blue spruce. Sensitive flowering plants include gladiolus, lily, tulip, and yucca. Domestic water that contains chlorine and/or fluoride is usually not harmful to poinsettias.

    SUMMARY .- ARE 1080 drops BY RELEASING FLOURINE/FLOURIDE KILLING OUR CONIFER KAURI TREES

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