Japanese government pays worker who developed cancer from Fukushima radiation

From fukushimawatch.com by by

“It’s no secret that exposure to high levels of radiation increases the risk for cancer. Nevertheless, showing that radiation exposure causes cancer is notoriously difficult. For the first time, the Japanese government has acknowledged that a worker at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant developed cancer from radiation exposure.

Copy of tanks
Workers at the stricken Daichi Nuclear Power Plant

“The man is in his 40s and is suffering from leukemia. He didn’t work full time at Fukushima the weeks following the disaster in March 2011, when radiation levels were at their highest. However, he did install covers on damaged reactors at the power plant from October 2012 to December 2013, and was exposed to a total of 19.8 millisieverts of radiation during that time … he was exposed to nearly four times the annual dose allowed for nuclear workers in Japan, which is less than half the amount US nuclear workers are exposed to each year.(1)”

The man will receive compensation for medical expenses and paid time off for lost income, said government officials.(2)”

girl-163889_1280
High child cancer rates (20-50 x) inside Fukushima Prefecture

“It’s not just workers at Fukushima who are at risk for radiation related illnesses. According to a recent study, thyroid cancer rates are 20 to 50 times higher among children who live inside the Fukushima Prefecture than those who don’t. This number is 25 percent higher than thyroid cancer rates reported last year.(3)”

Read more:

http://www.fukushimawatch.com/2015-11-03-japanese-government-pays-worker-who-developed-cancer-from-fukushima-radiation.html

(Note: the references cited (1-3) are contained in the original article)

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Japanese government pays worker who developed cancer from Fukushima radiation”

Your comments are welcomed

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s